Cone Shells, univalve shells of the genus conus, comprising many species and varieties. The shell is very thick, and appears as if rolled up in conical form. The outer lip is simple and sharp-edged, the inner lip is smooth. The spire is frequently very flat. The mollusk has a distinct head, with gills, a long proboscis, and a pair of tentacula bearing eyes. A horny operculum closes the opening of the shell. The cones are many of them very beautiful both in form and colors, and some specimens bring a high price. They are mostly found in tropical seas, but some are met with in the Mediterranean. They live in fissures and holes in rocks, and especially in the warm pools and on the sandy bottoms inside coral reefs, at depths varying from a few feet to 30 fathoms. They move slowly, and are all predatory; some will bite when handled. Some fossil species occur in the tertiary formation.

1. Conus imperialis. 2. C. zonatus. 3. C. nocturnus. 4. C. marmoreus.

1. Conus imperialis. 2. C. zonatus. 3. C. nocturnus. 4. C. marmoreus.