Cromlech, Or Cromleh, a primitive kind of sepulchral monument among the ancient Scandinavian and Celtic nations. It consisted of a large flat stone laid on other stones set upright to sustain it. These monuments are supposed by some antiquaries to have been also used as altars on which sacrifices were offered. One of the best known cromlechs is that called Kit's Coty House, situated on a hill about 1/2 m. N. E. of the village of Aylesbury, in the county of Kent, England. It is composed of three upright stones (two about 8 ft. square and 2 ft. thick, and the third somewhat smaller), which support an irregular roof stone about 11 ft. long, 8 ft. broad, and 2 ft. thick. The stones are of the kind called Kentish rag, and are rough and irregular in shape. Though the cromlech, dolmen, and kistvaen are frequently confounded, they are different, the first being open at the sides and ends, and larger, whereas the dolmen and kistvaen are closed up on every side. The word cromlech is probably derived from the Armoric crom, crooked or bending, and lech, or leli, a stone.

By the inhabitants of Wales and Cornwall cromlechs are called coetne Arthor, or Arthur's quoits.

Kit's Coty House.

Kit's Coty House.