Elecampane (Fr. enule campane, from Lat. inula campana), the common name of the inula helenium, a handsome herb of the order compositoe, which, introduced into America from Europe, is now common in our gardens, and grows wild in meadows and by the roadsides in the northern states. The root should be dug in autumn and of the second year's growth. It has an agreeable aromatic odor when dried, somewhat like that of camphor, and its taste when chewed is warm and bitter; water and alcohol extract its peculiar properties, the latter most readily. Its extracts afford the vegetable principles alantine or in-uline, resembling starch, and helenine, which forms long white crystals. The powdered root or the decoction in water is used in medicine as a tonic and stimulant. It is prescribed, if at all, in chronic diseases of the lungs. It is known in medicine by the name of inula. The dose of the powder is about a drachm; of the decoction one or two fluid ounces.

Elecampane (Inula helenium).

Elecampane (Inula helenium).