Motherwort (honurus cardiaca; Gr.Motherwort 1100402 , a lion, and Motherwort 1100403 a tail), a plant belonging to the mint family or laliatm. It is met with around walls, fences, and neglected spots near farms and gardens. The root is perennial, stem 2 to 5 ft. high, branching near the base, and downy; leaves 2 to 4 in. long, lobed and broad, growing narrower toward the top of the stem, the uppermost wedge-shaped at base and three-cleft at the apex, all bending downward. The flowers are borne in many whorls; the calyx has rigid and prickly teeth; the corolla, hairy without, is pale purple; the nutlets containing the seeds are triquetrous and truncate at summit. Another species, L. rnarrubiastrum, has become partially naturalized in some districts of Pennsylvania; it is a tall biennial with oblong-ovate stem leaves and whiter flowers. The common motherwort has a strong, pungent odor, and a bitter taste, and, as its name indicates, has been used as a remedy in diseases of females, and at one time it acquired a reputation in Russia as a preventive of hydrophobia; at most it is an aromatic tonic, and its use is now confined to domestic practice.

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca).

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca).