Fiberlia [Fi-Ber'-Lia]. A recently introduced flax fibre made from the stalk of American flax, which can be combined with cotton or wool, or used alone, in the manufacture of fabrics. This has been a problem with textile manufacturers for over half a century. An English inventor, in 1851, announced he had found a process whereby it could be done, but after practical tests it failed. The trouble was that the long straight fibre of flax which was cut to match both cotton and wool in length, had blunt flat ends, which showed in the manufacture of goods. By the new invention of fiber-lia the flax fibres are free from such defects and match in length either cotton or wool without being cut. The material ready for use is soft and pliable and will take dyes of the finest tints. The cost of production does not exceed 8 cents per pound, and can be furnished by the Northwestern States in practically unlimited quantities. In 1891 it was used in a limited way in the manufacture of blankets, about one-quarter fibrelia and three-quarters wool. It has also been used for toweling, and in the manufacture of cotton and woolen hosiery. In addition to its being used in the making of fabrics, it can be substituted for absorbent cotton in hospitals, as it possesses the same properties of scraped lint or pure linen.

Name Of Fiber

Locality

Remarks

Vegetable Horse-hair.

Central America___}

Upholstery purposes, like animal horsehair.

Screw Pine______.....

Maurituns Yucatan.

Panama hats, strips for matting.

Panama Screw Pine..

Central America_____

Panama hats, strips for matting.

Orin Vegetal..................

Algeria............___

Substitute for horse-hair.

Tucum .................

Brazil.................

Fine twine for hammocks.

Tibisire_________.....

Brazil .

Cordage.

Cabbage Palm_______

Australia..... ______

Used for hat making.

Tolipot................

India___......_______

Matting, baskets.

Kitul.................

Ceylon______.........

Brushes, cordage.

Piassava..........................

Brazil.................

Brushes, cordage.

Gomuti.................

Java..................

Native ship ropes.

Rattan................

East India Islands___

Strips for chair seats; fibers for stuffing.

Coir..................

Ceylon, etc........___

See COIR.

Silk...............}

Italy, France, Asia, } United States .......}

See Silk.

Wool...............}

In every civilized and } semi-civilized conn } try on the globe........ }

See Wool.