Measures Of Length

Denominations and Values.

Equivalents in Use,

 

10,000 meters

1,000 meters

100 meters

10 meters

1 meter

l-10th of a meter

l-100th of a meter

1-1,000th of a meter

6.2137 miles

 

.62137 miles, or 3,280 feet, 10 inches

 

328 feet and 1 inch

 

393.7 inches

 

39.37 inches

 

3.937 inches

 

.3937 inches

 

.0394 inches

   

Measures Of Surface

Denominations and Values.

Equivalents in Use.

 

10,000 square meters

100 square meters

1 square meter

 
 

119.6 square yards

 
   

Measures Of Volume

Denominations

and Values.

Equivalents in Use.

Names.

No. OF Liters.

Cubic Measures.

Dry Measure.

Wine Measure.

Kiloliter or stere.

1,000 100

10

1

1-10

1-100

1-1,000

1 cubic meter l-10th cubic meter

10 cubic decimeters

1 cubic decimeter

l-10th cubic decimeter

10 cubic centimeters 1 cubic centimeter

1.308 cubic yards

2 bushels and 3.35 pecks

9.08 quarts .908 quarts

6.1023 cubic inches .6102 cubic inches .061 cubic inches

264.17 gallons 26.417 gallons

2.6417 gallons

1.0567 quarts .845 gills .338 fluidounces .27 fluidrachms

Weights

Denominations and Values.

Equivalents in Use.

Names.

Number of Grams.

Weight or Volume of Water at its Maximum Density.

Avoirdupois Weight.

 

1,000,000

100,000

10,000

1,000

100

10

1

1-10

1-100

1-1,000

1 cubic meter

1 hectoliter

10 liters

1 liter

1 deciliter

10 cubic centimeters

1 cubic centimeter

1/10th of a cubic centimeter

10 cubic millimeters

1 cubic millimeter

2,204.6 pounds

220.46 pounds

22.046 pounds

2.2046 pounds.

 
 
 
   
 

15.432 grains

 

1.5432 grains

.1543 grains

 
   

For measuring surfaces, the square dekameter is used under the term of ARE ; the hectare, or 100 ares, is equal to about 2.5 acres. The unit of capacity is the cubic decimeter or LITER, and the series of measures is formed in the same way as in the case of the table of lengths. The cubic meter is the unit of measure for solid bodies, and is termed STERE. The unit of weight is the GRAM, which is the weight of one cubic centimeter of pure water weighed in a vacuum at the temperature of 4° C. or 39.2° F., which is about its temperature of maximum density. In practice, the term cubic centimeter, abbreviated c.c, is generally used instead of milliliter, and cubic meter instead of kiloliter.