Silver solder is cast in the form of ingots, which are hammered or rolled into thin sheets. From these small chips or "links," as they are called, are cut off. The melted solder can also be poured, when slightly cooled, into a dry iron mortar and pulverized while still warm. The solder can also be filed and the filings used for soldering.

Silver solders are used not only for soldering silver objects, but also for soldering metals of which great resistance is expected. A distinction must be drawn between silver solder consisting either of copper and silver alone, and silver solder to which tin has been added.

Very Hard Silver Solder for Fine Silverware

I

Copper.......... 1 part

Silver............ 4 parts

Hard silver solder.

II

Copper.......... 1 part

Silver............ 20 parts

Brass............ 9 parts

III

Copper..........     2 parts

Silver............   28 parts

Brass............   10 parts

Soft silver solder.

IV

Silver............ 2 parts

Brass............ 1 part

V

Silver............ 3 parts

Copper.......... 2 parts

Zinc............. 1 part

VI

Silver............ 10 parts

Brass............ 10 parts

Tin............. 1 part

These solders are preferably to be employed for the completion of work begun with hard silver solders, defective parts alone being treated. For this purpose it is sometimes advisable to use copper-silver alloys mixed with zinc, as for example:

VII

Silver............ 12 parts

Copper.......... 4 parts

Zinc............. 1 part

VIII

Silver............ 5 parts

Brass............ 6 parts

Zinc............. 2 parts

This last formula (VIII) is most commonly used for ordinary silverware.