The question as to who may be a trustee is thus discussed in the leading work on the subject of Trusts :2

"The question who may be a trustee involves a variety of considerations. Thus, a person to be a trustee must be capable of taking and holding the property in which the trust is declared. Again, the trustee should be competent to deal with the estate as required by the trust, or as directed by the beneficiaries, whereas certain classes are by nature or by the rules of law under disability. Again, the execution of the trust may call for the application of judgment and a knowledge of business. And again, the trustee ought to be amenable to the jurisdiction of the court which administers trusts. In general terms, therefore, a trustee should be a person capable of taking and holding the legal estate, and possessed of natural capacity and legal ability to execute the trust."

1 Lewin on Trusts, Vol. I, Chapter III (Outline Of Proceedings In Equity. Section 7. The Proceedings), Section 1.

2 Id., Vol. I, Chapter III (Outline Of Proceedings In Equity. Section 7. The Proceedings), Section 2.

A trust will never be allowed to fail for want of a trustee, and anyone who can hold the legal title may be a trustee.3

Corporations may act as trustee, if not inconsistent with their purposes or contrary to their charters.4 Municipal corporations may be trustees.5

An infant of any age may be a trustee, at least temporarily. In cases where the infant is too young to perform the necessary duties, the court may remove him and appoint a competent party to the position.