He wants something that will test his horse's capacity and, at the same time, his own nerve. Sometimes he finds it in polo; but unless he is young and ardently athletic, he is apt to find it more to his taste in hunting.

So it is to this desire of men who enjoy many luxuries to add to them one more, that will counteract some of the others, that the recent development of American hunting is largely due. If any hunt is to prosper, it must include among its backers a certain number of men who are prepared to take it seriously. When the hounds go out some one must go with them, - must go rain or shine, whether the spirit moves or not, whether the flesh is willing or otherwise. To keep up a hunt is a laborious business; and there must be in every hunt some members who are willing to take it laboriously when that is necessary, and hold their personal convenience secondary to the demands of sport. Unless the master of the hounds evinces a devotion of this nature, and unless he has one or two colleagues on whom he can rely, the hunt is apt not to prosper. These mainstays of a hunt must be able to command a considerable degree of leisure. If they are forthcoming, and are willing to spend their strength and money in maintaining the hunt, they will usually win to their support a following of less-determined sportsmen, with less time to spare, who will hunt when they can, pay dues when that is necessary, and lend their countenance and a limited amount of personal support to the enterprise.

New York, which, awaiting the further development of Chicago, is more than any other American city the centre of American enterprises, is, in at least one particular, the most important centre of American hunting. There are more men in New York than in any other one town who want to hunt, who can afford to hunt, and who are willing to take a considerable amount of trouble to do it; and though other cities had hunts long before New York did, no other American city has so many as six subsidiary hunt clubs at her doors. The most noted and important of these six New York hunts is the Mea~ dowbrook. Its pedigree is too much involved for the present writer to trace it with much hope of historical accuracy; but it seems to derive, with more or less indirection, from the Queens County Drag Hounds, organized in September, 1877, by Messrs, Robert Center, W. C. Peat, A,

Waiting for the Word. {Meet of the Meadowbrook Hunt at Southampton, L.I., in the Fall of 1891.)

Waiting for the Word. {Meet of the Meadowbrook Hunt at Southampton, L.I., in the Fall of 1891.)

Belmont Purdy, and F. Gray Griswold, at Meadowbrook, Long Island. These gentlemen or their assigns hunted the Meadowbrook country for three years. Then their pack was removed to Westchester County, and stayed two years. Then it went back to Far Rockaway, Long Island. Meanwhile, Hempstead was occupied by a new subscription pack, which held its first meet in September, 1880, and took the name of the Meadowbrook Hunt. The old Queens County pack, after moving back to Far Rockaway, was joined by, or merged into, the Rockaway Hunt Club, and still exists under the latter name, with kennels and a club-house at Cedarhurst. One of its founders, Mr. Griswold, was lately master of the Meadowbrook hounds. One of his predecessors in that office was Mr. Thomas Hitchcock, Jr., who hunts a pack of his own in the winter, at Aiken, S.C. The present master is Mr. Ralph M. Ellis. The Meadowbrook Club-house, near Westbury, is a pleasant but unpretentious house, which answers for a sort of country club for the neighboring district. It has a ball-room and ladies' annex, plenty of bedrooms, where some of the members live in summer, ample stables and kennels, and a golf-links. The club has about seventy members, who pay annual dues of $100. Its pack of some thirty-six couple of English hounds is efficient, and well kept up. It hunts in the spring from March until well into May, and in the fall from Oct. I until the ground freezes. Occasionally it hunts wild foxes; but it finds so many obstacles to that form of sport that the drag is its main reliance, as it is of all the other clubs near New York. Inasmuch as drag-hunting is generally conceded to be an inferior sport to fox-hunting, it is worth while to consider why all the hunt clubs near New York prefer it. The reasons for the Meadowbrook's preference are partly local. The woods in the twenty square miles of country the club hunts over are large, and without roads, and the foxes in them can seldom be persuaded to break covert and run over the open country, as well-regulated foxes should. Another important reason, which applies to the majority of the suburban hunt clubs, is, that at least one-half of the Meadow-brook's members are men of business, who go daily to New York to their work. They get home by an afternoon train, and, by dint of hurrying, gain two or three hours from the working-day, which they can spend on a horse's back. Accordingly, when they get to the meet, at three o'clock or thereabouts, there is not time for an indefinite search after a fox, even if the country were favorable to such a quest. The Meadowbrook men want a sure run whenever they go out. They want it to begin promptly, and to end with certainty in time for dinner. Obviously, therefore, drag-hunting fits their necessities better than fox-hunting. They take the best sport they can get, and make the most of it. What they make of drag-hunting is matter of notoriety on both sides of the salt seas. They ride exceedingly good horses; their hounds are swift, and their pace is fast. The great Hempstead plain, which lies near them, is unfenced, and free from obstacles, an admirable place to gallop or drive over at most seasons of the year. But when they leave that, and strike the neighboring farming-lands, the fences are frequent and strong, of the post and rail variety, and from four to five feet high, with occasional taller ones. Drag-hunting over obstacles of this sort is a very wakeful sport, and only the boldest huntermen on the best nags can hope to find happiness in it. But the Meadowbrook men like it. From twenty to forty riders follow their hounds every hunting-day; and the sport grows more popular, and the club larger, from year to year. Steeplechases are a familiar dissipation of the Meadowbrook men, and occasionally they have them of the point-to-point variety. Like all the hunt clubs, and the suburban clubs especially, they make the most of holidays.