O each profession beiongs its own language. A full list of the terms in use aboard ship could scarce be printed between the covers of this book; but a few of such as would be used by a yachtsman may be mentioned. When you go a-sailing, you first "ship" (put in place) your rudder, and "step" (put in place) your mast; be sure to get both "pintles" directly over their "gudgeons" before you cast off the " painter" or get " under way." Suppose you wish to "weather" some dangerous rock "under your lee," you will haul aft the "sheet," which last term does not refer to a sail, but to the rope which is fast to the "clew" or lower "after" corner of a "fore-and-aft" sail. After you have made a short "board." let us say, on the "starboard tack" - that is, run a short distance with the wind on the right-hand side of your yacht - you will have to "go about," and perhaps can make a "long board" on the "port tack." You are now clear of the land, and can "gybe the boom," so as to let her "go free;" after "running" out to sea, you put your "helm down "and" luff up," so as to speak one of your companions. If the latter should be a steam yacht, it is the master's duty to "keep out of your way" - that is, so manage his vessel that there shall be no danger to your boat; a very reasonable rule, since with steam he can go in any direction, while you are dependent upon the wind. But if both yachts are under sail, then the one on the "starboard tack" has the "right of way," and the one on the "port tack" must "give way." I will not even guess at the size or the rig of your yacht, but it is safe to presume that the "clew of the mainsail" is hauled out to the end of a boom; this would be true of a schooner, a sloop, a British cutter, or a cat-boat. A very few sailboats now carry "sprit-s'ls" - that is, sails extended to the wind by a light spar, one end of which spreads the head of the sail, while the other is supported by an "eye-splice" in a short length of rope fixed on the mast a few feet from the "gunwale" of the boat. The edge or part of the sail to which the "bolt-rope" is sewed is called the "leech;" "the head, the foot, the after-leech, and the luff," are the four sides or edges, and any rope which hoists anything aloft is called its "halliards." The spar at the head of your mains'l is the "gaff;" and it is sometimes furnished with both "throat halliards," near the mast, and "peak halliards," near to the "after-leech." Your jib, or three-cornered sail forward of the mast, has its "jib halliards; "it also has a "down-haul," while any sail which is set on a boom has an "outhaul." A sail is "furled" when it is taken in and stowed in its place; it is "reefed" when it is reduced in size by gathering in some part of it to the yard or the bolt-rope, tying it there by small ropes fixed in line in the sail itself. These are called "reef-points," while the larger rope which is securely passed in a lashing at the "bolt-rope" is called the "earing." This takes the strain off the "body" (the central cloths of the sail), and is itself restrained from tearing the canvas by being passed through an iron ring worked into the sail. This iron ring is found wherever it is needful for the sail to bear the strain of a rope, and is called a "thimble;" but a piece of rope usually passes around it in a loop, and this entire loop, protected on its inner side by the "thimble," is the "reef cringle." You "carry away" a mast or other spar when it breaks away from its fastening, or when a part of it breaks off. If it simply weakens or becomes unsteady, it is only "sprung."

Rounding the Buoy.

Rounding the Buoy.

Let us suppose that in your cruise you are far enough from land to sight a "square-rigged" vessel inward bound; she has "hove to" for a pilot, while near to her may be seen the pilot-boat, usually a small schooner "lying to." The first-named has simply "braced her main yards aback," so that there is as much sail-power forcing her astern as ahead; while the pilot-boat, being desirous to remain for hours where she now lies, has "shortened sail" - that is, reduced it to just enough to keep her hull balanced on the waves, over which she rides with her bow pointing almost into the wind, and drifting off to "leeward."

But the pilot goes to the "bark" (a three-masted vessel with one mast, the "mizzen," rigged just like your sloop, the two others having "yards," crossing the masts, on which are square sails) in a small boat; he seizes hold of the "man-ropes," one on each side of the "Jacob's ladder" hanging over the "lee" side in the "waist," or about half-way from the bow to the stern of the vessel. These ropes are sharply pointed at one end, and at the other they have a knot made not like the one a landsman would make, but squarely built in the very centre of the strands by passing each one of them around the "standing part." and through the "bights" or loops made with the strands.

There are few mechanics on shore that work as incessantly as merchant seamen when at sea. If not engaged in making or taking in sail, they are at work on the ship's hull, its sails or its ropes; and they do in their way as skilful, even as ornamental, work as that executed in silk or worsted by their sisters and sweethearts at home. Watch a sailor handle a rope, and you will notice that he does just the right thing for each emergency; for example, he will hoist the ensign aloft in a small roll, then with a twitch of the halliards he shakes it out, and it floats in the breeze; he will put a running bowline in the end of a rope which is "rove" through a "block" at the "mast-head," and lower himself safely to the deck, when a landsman could not even trust himself to knot the rope securely. For each purpose he has its appropriate "hitch, bend, splice, seizing, or lashing." Far more of this ornamental and seaman-like work might be done aboard yachts, so that, however small the craft, she might show that she was owned by a sailor. I thought in beginning this article that I might possibly give some directions as to this work, but it is not easily explained without engravings. Mr. R. H. Dana, a Boston boy who went two years before the mast, and wrote a famous book about it, also published a work entitled The Seaman's Friend, in which may be found plates of great use to those who wish to learn how to handle ropes. It is also the most correct and comprehensive manual of seamanship as practised on sea-going vessels that has ever been printed. We should all be proud of the fact that it was the work of a man of education, for many years a celebrated lawyer, who followed the seaman's vocation for the benefit of his health, but perfected himself in every duty of his station. So great is the fascination of the life of a sailor, that Mr. Dana himself said to me, within two years of his death, that he could not go to one of our wharves and see a square-rigged vessel without feeling all the old longing to go to sea.