View From The Terrace At Pau.

View From The Terrace At Pau.

The Castle At Pau, From The Park.

The Castle At Pau, From The Park.

These mountains form, however, only a dazzling background to the panorama visible from the promenade at Pau; for in the immediate foreground, fifty feet below the parapet on which we leaned, rushes the impetuous river Gave, the murmur of whose hurrying waters is distinctly heard; and between this and the white peaks themselves, still twenty miles away, are verdant plains and rolling wooded hills, dotted with villas, villages, and farms.

Although considered a health-resort, Pau's list of invalids is not so long as to depress the pleasure-loving tourist. Yet it is thought to have an ideal climate, - a trifle cold in winter, perhaps, but equable, and favored by a southern exposure and a cloudless sky. Those people, too (and there are not a few of them), who think that fierce winds are the emissaries of Satan sent to buffet them, and are driven well - nigh mad by the nervous irritability thus engendered, can find in Pau a place where strong winds are entirely unknown. During "the season," therefore, about four thousand visitors come here annually. Unlike most sanitariums, however, Pau boasts of an eventful history. Its reason for existence does not lie in the exhilarating tonic of its mountain air or the enchanting scenery that it commands. For seven hundred years it was the capital of the old province of Bearn, renowned as one of the last strongholds of mediaeval chivalry, and which became a part of France no longer ago than 1620. So independent was the spirit of its rulers, that one of them, when reproved because he had not taken part in the war between France and England, haughtily replied: "The wars between England and France in no way concern me, for I hold my country of Bearn from God, by my sword, and by inheritance. There is, therefore, no reason why I should enter the service or incur the hatred of either of these kings." The old time-honored castle of the town is admirably preserved and is an object of the greatest veneration, not only as a fine memorial of former grandeur, but, in particular, as the birthplace and residence of the beloved Henry IV.

In The Park At Pau.

In The Park At Pau.

The gallant Henry of Navarre is still the idol of the Bearnese, and everything pertaining to his memory is as carefully cherished here as are souvenirs of Napoleon at the Hotel des Invalides. There are several statues of him in the little town, the finest being the work of the sculptor, Raggi, in the Place Royale. This figure, which is more than life-size and of white marble, represents the "Good King" standing, with his right hand extended as if welcoming a friend, while the left rests easily on the hilt of his. sword. Over his shoulder falls the long scarf that he often wore; and his well-known hat, with the traditional white plumes of Navarre, lies as if carelessly dropped, at his feet. Upon the pedestal are reliefs by Etex portraying scenes from Henry's childhood in these mountains, as well as some of his conspicuous deeds as king and warrior. Within the castle also, we found in almost every room, glowing upon canvas or woven in tapestry, the genial features of this sovereign. In studying his face I could readily believe the statement that he was noted not only for his bravery, but for his graceful manners, fascinating conversation, and sprightly wit. He was, in fact, the incarnation of the happy, reckless, generous, pleasure-loving spirit of that age. Quick at repartee, fond of a jest, at home on horseback or in camp, fearless in fighting, but not vindictive, fond of the ladies, and devoted to his friends, it is not strange that the people of his time adored him, and that his memory is cherished still. Faults he assuredly had, but they were the faults most easily forgiven, - those of the heart. The best-loved sovereigns of the world have always been those whose warm impulses rather than cold calculations have led them into error.

Statue Of Henry IV, Pau.

Statue Of Henry IV, Pau.

The Tortoise Shell Cradle Of Henry IV.

The Tortoise-Shell Cradle Of Henry IV.