Range. - Whole of North America from Hudson Bay southward, breeding throughout its range.

A small wader about 7.5 inches in length, with brownish gray upper parts, and white underparts thickly spotted with blackish, especially on the breast and flanks. This is the most abundant of all the shore birds, and its "peet-weet" is a familiar sound to every country boy. It has a peculiar habit of continually moving its tail up and down, when at rest on a stone or when running along the shore; from these characteristic actions it has received the very common names of "Teeter-tail" and "Tip-up." They build their nests on the ground near ponds, brooks or marshes, generally concealing it in a tuft of grass or weeds on the shore or in the high grass at the edge of the meadows. The eggs number from three to five and are of a grayish buff color, spotted and blotched with blackish brown. The young, like those of all the shore birds, are hatched covered with down, and run about as soon as born. They are anxiously attended by the parents and at the least sign of danger, conceal themselves beneath a tuft of grass or behind a small stone, where they remain perfectly motionless until called by the old birds. The adults frequently attempt to lead an enemy away from the young by feigning a broken wing, or lameness. Size of eggs 1.35 x .90. Data. - Parker County, Ind., May 22, 1901. Nest about six yards from bank of creek, among weeds on a sand bar; a hollow in the sand lined with weeds. Collector, Winfield S. Catlin.

263 Spotted Sandpiper Actitis Macularia 466

Buff.

Buff breasted Sandpiper. Spotted Sandpiper.

Buff-breasted Sandpiper. Spotted Sandpiper.

263 Spotted Sandpiper Actitis Macularia 467263 Spotted Sandpiper Actitis Macularia 468NEST OF SPOTTED SANDPIPER,

NEST OF SPOTTED SANDPIPER,.

SPOTTED SANDPIPER AND NEST.

C. A. Reed. SPOTTED SANDPIPER AND NEST.