Range. - Southeastern British Provinces and the adjacent portions of the United States; west to the Rockies.

This is the bird that is well known to hunters of "big game" by various names such as "Whiskey Jack," "Moose Bird," "Camp Robber," etc. During the winter months, owing to the scarcity of food, their thieving propensities are greatly enhanced and they remove everything from the camps, which looks as though it might be edible. Birds of this genus are smoky gray on the back and lighter below, shading to white on the throat; the forehead and part of the crown is white and the nape blackish. Their nests are placed at low elevations in bushes or fir trees, and are usually very different from any of the preceding Jays' nests. They are nearly as high as wide, and are made of small twigs, moss, catkins, weeds and feathers making a soft spongy mass which is placed in an upright crotch. The eggs are a yellowish gray color spotted and blotched with brown and grayish. Size 1.15 x .80. Data. - In-nisfail, Alberta, March 12, 1903. Nest a beautiful structure of twigs, moss and feathers in a willow bush, 6 feet from the ground. The thermometer registered 32 below zero the day the eggs were taken. Collector, W. Blackwood.

Grayish buff

Grayish buff.

Grayish

Grayish.

Canada Jay

Canada Jay.

484 Canada Jay Perisoreus Canadensis Canadensis 964

484a. Rocky Mountain Jay. Perisoreus Canadensis Capitalis

Range. - Rocky Mountains from Montana to Arizona.

This variety has the whole crown white and only a small amount of blackish on the nape. Its nesting habits and eggs are precisely like those of the last.

NEST AND EGGS OF CANADA JAY SHOWING CONSTRUCTION

NEST AND EGGS OF CANADA JAY SHOWING CONSTRUCTION.

484b. Alaska Jay. Perisoreus Canadensis Fumifrons

Range. - Alaska.

A very similar bird to the Canada Jay but with the forehead yellowish or duller; the nests and eggs are like those of the others of the genus.

484c. Labrador Jay. Perisoreus Canadensis Nigricapillus

Ranges. - Labrador.

This is a darker variety of the Canada Jay. Its eggs cannot be distinguished from those of any of the others of the genus.