To Dry Bottles

Pour some dry mustard seed into the bottle and shake well. The seeds soon absorb the moisture and leave the interior of the bottle clean and dry.

Bottle Stoppers

Alkalies attack the glass of bottles as well as stoppers and tend to cement them together. For this reason they should be treated with paraffin wax.

To Loosen Bottle Stoppers

(a) Tip the bottle slightly to one side, yet not sufficiently to have the solution run into the neck. Then quickly heat the neck of the bottle with a lighted match or candle. This causes the neck to expand slightly, which will invariably loosen the glass stopper. The bottle should, of course, be revolved so as to heat all sides of the neck uniformly.

(b) Run a little sweet oil around the stopper and allow it to stand for about an hour.

To Blacken Brass

(a)

Copper Nitrate...................................

100 grs.

Water.................................................

1/2 oz.

(b)

Silver Nitrate......................................

100 grs.

Water.................................................

1/2 oz.

After preparing the two solutions separately, mix. Clean the brass thoroughly, and them place in the solution. Remove and heat considerably.

Breadth

A term, in composition, to denote the proper balance and relative value between the lights and darks of a picture. Breadth is secured by making a principal object predominate, keeping parts of secondary importance in due subordination.

Brilliancy

When a negative is snappy and bright, possessing pleasing contrast between high-lights and shadows, it is said to be brilliant. Brilliancy results from correct exposure and careful development.

Bromide of Barium

(See Barium Bromide.)

Bromide of Cadmium

(See Cadmium Bromide.)

Bromide of Calcium

(See Calcium Bromide.)

Bromide of Potassium

(See Potassium Bromide.)

Bromide of Silver

(See Silver Bromide.)

Bromide of Sodium

(See Sodium Bromide.)

Bromide Paper

Paper coated with sensitive gelatino-bromide of silver, and employed for enlargements or contact printing. Must be handled in deep yellow or ruby light. There are various grades, surfaces, degrees of sensitiveness, etc. (See Gaslight Paper.)

Bromine

Br.

Very dark reddish-brown liquid. Poisonous. Compounded with silver, potassium, ammonium, etc., is vitally useful in photography. Silver bromide, especially, forms the principal sensitive chemical in the dry plate emulsion. Potassium bromide is very useful as a restrainer in developing solutions.