The beautiful Artura Red Tones which elicited such favorable comment at the recent National Convention may be secured on Artura prints by the following method, with but very little trouble. A few precautions are necessary to secure the best results, but the method is quite simple and the resulting red prints are brilliant in tone, and all the gradation of the original print is retained. The method is as follows:

The black and white print must first be toned to a sepia in the Hypo-Alum toning bath, after which precautions must be taken to eliminate all traces of hypo from the print.

Artura Hypo-Alum Bath

Boiling Water (distilled or rainwater )....

128

ozs.

Hypo........

16

ozs.

Alum...........

4

ozs.

After bath has cooled, mix separately and add:

Water.........

1

oz.

Nitrate of Silver Crystals . . .

60

grs.

Salt...........

60

grs.

Using the bath at a temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit will tone prints in about 30 minutes.

When the prints have been toned and thoroughly washed, put them through a salt bath. The strength of the salt water may be about 1 to 32, but a little more or less salt will not injure the prints. Rinse in clear water and the prints are ready to tone.

Toning Bath

No. 1

Water..........

15

ozs.

Chloride of Gold......

15

grs.

No. 2

Water..........

15

ozs.

Potassium Sulphocyanate . .

90

grs.

Add either one to the other, stirring the solution slowly, so as not to precipitate the gold. This 30 oz. bath will tone about 18 prints, 8 x 10, or their equivalent.

To strengthen this bath it is necessary to use both chemicals. Make a stock solution, No. 1, by dissolving 15 grains of gold in. two ounces of water, and No. 2 by dissolving 90 grains of Potassium Sulphocyanate in two ounces of water. Add equal quantities of Nos. 1 and 2 to the old bath, the number of drams of each depending upon the number of prints to be toned. Using this stock solution avoids adding more water to the bath.

A few prints at a time, say six 8x10 prints in a 30 oz. bath, will tone more quickly than if a greater number are placed in the bath at one time.

Prints should tone to a rich red in about 10 minutes, after which they are immediately placed in an acid fixing bath for 20 minutes and washed in the usual way.

The amount of gold required to tone a print depends upon the amount of silver deposit in the print. A strong, dark print having had long development will require more gold than a light print with a white background. Dark prints should be rubbed with the palm of the hand occasionally to make them tone quickly.

From An Artura Iris Print Home Portrait By C. H. Wiebmer.

From An Artura Iris Print Home Portrait By C. H. Wiebmer. St. Paul, Minn.

Be sure all traces of hypo from the hypo-alum toning bath have been eliminated, as the least trace of hypo in the print will precipitate the gold and stop the toning. This is important.

Prints which have been toned sepia and dried, will tone equally as well as newly made prints.

The School Of Photography At Syracuse University

All those who are interested in the welfare of the photographic profession will be pleased to learn of the rapid strides which are being made by the photographic school of the Syracuse University.

By the end of this year, the school hopes to be housed in a home of its own, plans now being under consideration for a special building, with ground floor lecture room, studio, four dark rooms, plate, lens and shutter-testing rooms, and the usual offices. On the floor above will be built a portrait and motion picture studio, 30 x 60 feet, in which it will be possible to stage any ordinary play.

It may be well, to save applicants trouble, by explaining that the course is of a technical as well as practical nature, and extends over two years of study, comprising the necessary art and chemical training required for anyone to qualify as an expert with the camera, either in the laboratory or in the studio.

Professor E. J. Wall advises us that the Syracuse School, besides its already complete studio and motion picture equipment, is to install in its new building a Hurter & Driffield plate testing machine, with special photometer and a complete optical bench, making the school a reliable testing establishment for lenses, plates and papers. A photo-micrographic department will also be fitted up, and spectro-graphic work will be undertaken.

Our schools of photography are excellent, their purpose having been to turn out practical photographers rather than men who are competent to enter the field of chemical research, the laboratory of the manufacturer or motion picture work.

The field is broad, both classes of schools are a great benefit to the profession and this new department in one of America's greatest universities, deserves hearty support, since its work will be in the interest of every branch of the photographic art.

From An Artura Iris Print Home Portrait By C. H. Wiebmer St. Paul, Minn.

From An Artura Iris Print Home Portrait By C. H. Wiebmer St. Paul, Minn.