"Yes, we had a rattling good business during December couldn't have been better in fact, unless we had been able to make some enlargements, but we didn't have the room nor the time to bother with them."

A man really made that remark, and there are probably others who had the same experience, for this holiday season was surely a hummer. But is there really any excuse for letting this enlarging business get away from you?

Read over the Eastman professional booklet on enlarging and see if you don't think you could have made your own enlargements just as well as not. You know it is profitable work, but possibly you have never made a study of its requirements.

If you have an Aristo Lamp, it is not necessary to use condensers. The reflecting cone of the Graphic Enlarging Camera, used with the Aristo Lamp, gives ample illumination, and a flashed opal glass will give the greatest amount of diffusion with the least obstruction of the light. One sheet of this flashed opal glass has the diffusing power of two or three sheets of ground glass.

But you say you haven't the room to work in.

Let's see how much room it will take. Suppose your darkroom is eight feet long and there is a partition between the darkroom and printing room. You can have your Aristo Lamp in the printing room with the cone between the lamp and the darkroom partition, in which an opening of the proper size has been cut. This leaves the entire length of the dark-room for enlarging. If a lens of ten-inch focus is used and a four times enlargement is wanted, the distance from the negative to the enlarging easel will be slightly over five feet; so even a smaller dark-room could be used, if necessary. The tables in the booklet on enlarging give the exact distance necessary between lenses of different focus and the enlarging easel for the making of enlargements from two to twenty times the size of the original image.

Enlargements may be made in any part of the studio at night by using the F. & S. Aristo Lamp Jacket, a device that fits snugly over the lamp, allowing no light to escape except into the cone of the enlarging camera.

Enlargements, up to any size on Velox. Artura Carbon Black or Bromide, are made without the necessity of fitting up a special room. The jacket is constructed entirely of metal and may be quickly attached to the lamp and as readily removed.

The R. O. C. Enlarging Back is similar in construction to the back of the Graphic Enlarging Camera and may be instantly attached to the back of a view camera, in place of the regular ground glass frame, if it is desired to make an improvised enlarging camera. It may be used with either artificial or day-light, has a negative carrier with full set of nested kits, and grooves for Hashed opal or ground glass diffusing screens.

The flashed opal glass is a decided advantage where it is necessary to have all the illumination possible with the greatest amount of diffusion. This glass may be had from your dealer at the following prices:

7

X

7

• . • •

$0.75

8

X

10

. . . .

.75

10

x

10

• • * •

.90

10

X

12

. . .

$ .90

11

X

14

. . .

1.50

14

X

17

. . .

2.25

Artura Carbon Black is, without question, the best paper on the market for the professional making high-class portrait enlargements. It fully preserves all the delicacy and gradation of the original negative, the enlargement being very difficult to detect from a contact print. With the introduction of Artura Carbon Black Buff Stock, the variety of grades afforded is ample for duplicating the effect of practically any contact print.

Make your own enlargements and your interest in securing orders for this kind of work will be greater and your profits will increase in greater proportion, for enlargements do not entail the original cost of negative making - they are velvet.

The booklet, "Enlarging for the Professional," may be had from your dealer or will be mailed on request.

Your Competition

When a woman has ten dollars saved up to buy photographs and buys a new hat instead, it means that the photographer around the corner is not your only competition. The milliner is getting some of your business.

From An Artura Iris Print By Charles F. Townsend Des Moines, Iowa.

From An Artura Iris Print By Charles F. Townsend Des Moines, Iowa.

From An Artura Iris Print By Charles F. Townsend Des Moines, Iowa.

From An Artura Iris Print By Charles F. Townsend Des Moines, Iowa.

The Camera In Test Work

Not only is the camera a valuable aid in accurately recording the appearance of the finished product, but it is frequently called upon to determine the value of the things that enter into its make-up.

Recently the camera was employed as an aid in choosing fittings for motor cars at the Pierce-Arrow plant at Buffalo. It was necessary to make a choice between several kinds of headlamps, and road tests at night were not considered infallible in result because of the possibility of differing weather conditions. So the camera was called upon. On the night of the camera test a large screen was placed against a blank wall and the car with which the test was made was stationed some little distance away, facing the fixed position. As each set of headlights was fixed to the supports on the car and the lights switched on, two photographs were made - one of the screen alone to show the projection of the lamps' rays, and the other of the ground between the lamp and the screen to illustrate the diffusion. All the exposures were made under exactly the same conditions, the plates were all developed together and the prints made together. In this manner the resulting photographic prints gave an accurate idea of the comparative lighting power of the various lamps tried.

The Camera In Test Work StudioLightMagazine1913 44