Never has there been a time in the history of the British Empire when it has been so difficult to forecast the future of any section of our commerce or industries. No true Briton will admit the possibility of defeat or even of a peace which would leave the enemy in a position to cause injury to the Allied peoples for many a day; but there is one thing that photographers must not look forward to, and that is the maintenance of the boom in portrait work which started with the commencement of hostilities, and has continued up to the present. There is no doubt that the portrait has assumed greater importance in most British homes than it has ever done before, and that for many a day the result of the war will be orders for pictures to commemorate gallant men who have either perished gloriously or have lived to receive the reward of their valour. But this is but one side of the question. We have to look forward to a generally reduced standard of expenditure on the part of private customers after the cessation of hostilities, when the scattering of the nation's saving has ended and the process of rebuilding has commenced. Then must the photographer strive to share in the great effort which will be made to extend British commerce into regions hitherto supplied by the Central Powers, and to furnish our own people with goods for which we have hitherto been dependent on those who are now our enemies and with whom we shall be loth to deal again. One way in which we can participate is by furnishing matter for advertisements, not, of course, literary matter, which the professional "adsmith" provides, but illustrations which will give an accurate and at the same time attractive idea of the goods offered. In all large towns

There are firms which specialize in this class of work, and naturally they will retain their old customers and obtain new ones; but there are many comparatively small towns, which have large works situated near them, where it would be to the mutual advantage of photographer and manufacturer to come together. It is very convenient for the latter to be able to have a machine, a dinner service, or a suite of furniture photographed at an hour's notice, or in the short period available between completion and dispatch, and it is to the photographer's benefit to secure orders that call for no expensive mounts and no risk of resittings; but the work must be done in first-class style and finished ready for the engraver. If this can be done, there will be little difficulty in obtaining a fair price, although it must not be forgotten that all charges must be calculated upon a business basis, and not with any idea of charging a fee for artistic work. The photographer must, in fact, do as the manufacturer does - carefully work out the cost of production, and, after allowing for all establishment charges, add a reasonable margin of profit.

The first thing to be done is to prepare some well-finished sample prints, both mounted for display in the showroom and finished ready for the process engraver. Those who do not know the engraver's requirements should study good catalogues, and they will see that what is wanted is a clear image carefully blocked out, and with all the details clearly outlined, any lettering being very distinctly shown, while shadows are added where necessary with an air-brush. As a rule 12 x 10 is the favorite size for such work, but a smaller sized camera may be used, and enlargements made from the selected negatives. It is, however, better to make the 12 x 10 negatives direct if possible.

In addition to the prints supplied for process work, real photographic prints should be placed before the manufacturer, and every effort made to convince him of their "pulling" powers. Large orders may be obtained in this way, and if the photographer's own printing accommodation be limited, there are several firms who will turn him out from 500 to 500,000 in any size and of uniform quality.

Many other side lines suggest themselves, such as the copying of documents, drawings, etc., advertising pictures on a large scale for house agents, real photographic postcards for advertising purposes, and the like. Nor must it be forgotten that there is a good market for original studies for advertising purposes, such subjects as the "Skipper," the couple snugly ensconced in a Great Northern Railway carriage, and many others serving as examples of what is required in this direction. Special aptitude is required for some of the work we have mentioned, but for the bulk of it manipulative skill and business habits will bring in a satisfactory return, which will go far to reduce the falling off in revenue due to war conditions. Clean, bright work promptly delivered should be the aim of all who wish to have a share in commercial photography, and if this can be provided orders will not be slow in coming.

Business In The Future StudioLightMagazine1916 56

EASTMAN PORTRAIT FILM NEGATIVE, ARTURA PRINT

From Eastman Professional School Demonstration

Business In The Future StudioLightMagazine1916 58

EASTMAN PORTRAIT FILM NEGATIVE, ARTURA PRINT

From Eastman Professional School Demonstration