For prints that are light in tone - sketchy effects or white backgrounds, a fairly light mount may be used with a darker underlay to make the print stand out from its background. But the contrast between mount and underlay should never be so great that attention is drawn away from the print. The idea in mounting and framing is to center attention on the picture, and to accomplish this result the mount or frame must enhance the attractiveness of the picture.

A Suggestion StudioLightMagazine1918 198

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Lauritz Bros. Los Angeles, Cal.

A Suggestion StudioLightMagazine1918 200

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Lauritz Bros. Los Angeles, Cal.

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FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Lauritz Bros. Los Angeles, Cal.

It might be added that fairly thin mounts make small enlargements more effective than heavy mounts, and a folder to hold the mount further improves it and gives your samples an attractive appearance.

It is difficult to give more advice on the finishing of enlargements. Your stock house carries an assortment of cover papers, folders and light weight cardboard, and an idea of the most suitable colors, surfaces and weights can only be had by ordering samples and trying them out. The method of embossing which we suggest is simple and needs only to be tried to convince you of the effectiveness of the result. The size and proportion of the enlargement is also an important consideration in making quick sales. Try the proportions we suggest and judge for yourself.

We trust some of these suggestions may be of benefit to those making portrait enlargements.Pictures for our soldiers in France should be made now. Advertise this fact.

The Focusing Screen - There is no part of the portrait photographer's apparatus which is more frequently misused or over-worked than the focusing screen. It is safe to say, indeed, that nineteen portraitists out of twenty ask this much abused accessory to do work for which it is quite unsuited. The inevitable result is that the quality of their work suffers and their business does not flourish as it should.

The focusing screen of a portrait camera is simply intended for focusing the image and placing it in its proper position and for helping to calculate the exposure by the amount of illumination which it shows. That is about as far as it can go towards the making of a portrait and, if it is relied upon to a greater extent, it is more likely to become a hindrance than a help.

The more skilful an operator becomes, the less he relies upon his focusing screen. He learns that the image it shows is deceptive. The finely graded emulsion of a portrait plate will pick up detail which is hardly visible on the comparatively coarse grain of the ground glass. What looks like a mass of impenetrable shadow on the focusing screen may become a pleasing, luminous, low-tone in his picture - provided the proper exposure has been given.

A Suggestion StudioLightMagazine1918 204

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Lauritz Bros. Los Angeles, Col.

Many of the most skilful operators in portrait photography never worry how the picture looks on the focusing screen until they are ready to make the exposure. They have trained their eyes to look direct at their sitter from the level of the lens, to note every little play of light and shade, to measure the depth of a shadow, and to know when to heighten or subdue the highlights. They have learned to settle the composition and lighting of the picture before resorting to the camera at all.

One of the ablest photographers in the country admitted recently that he had not looked through a focusing screen twenty times in as many years. He leaves the focusing to his assistant while he concentrates his own attention upon the posing and the lighting of his sitter. When everything is ready, he gives a signal to his assistant, who brings the camera into position and focuses the image. As soon as this is done, another signal is exchanged, the plate holder is inserted by the assistant and the bulb is pressed by the photographer whose attention has not been diverted, even for a moment, from the artistic side of the task in hand. This method of working undoubtedly goes a long way to account for the sincerity and the spontaneity, the natural posing, the effective lighting, the pure tone rendering and all the other high technical and artistic qualities which distinguish his portraiture.

Needless to say, this man is a photographer of much experience and that may explain in part, at least, his personal indifference to the focusing screen. The inexperienced operator, who is often more timid and bashful than his sitter, would be unable to proceed at all if he could not hide his head at frequent intervals under the convenient black cloth. It is certainly a trying experience for a youth who has just finished his apprenticeship to find himself face to face in the studio with a local celebrity in evening clothes or a great lady in an evening gown. And the operator whose lack of self-confidence first drives him to an excessive use of the focusing screen is only too apt to continue in the same bad practice all his life as a mere matter of habit.

There is another point of view to consider - the point of view of the sitter. Can you guess the feelings of a shy or sensitive sitter who patiently waits for the photographer to look on the focusiug screen, shift the camera about, take another look, reef a curtain, look again, move the reflector, and so on for ten or fifteen minutes? Can't you imagine how disconcerting and irritating it must be to sit there with the muzzle of a lens levelled at you point-blank, at short range, and a man behind it with his head buried under a black pall, issuing instructions about turning the head, raising the chin, closing the lips, and looking a little to the right or to the left?

A Suggestion StudioLightMagazine1918 206

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Lauritz Bros. Los Angeles, Cal.

It wouldn't be very pleasant, would it? If that is your method of working, can you wonder that there are still people who say that they would rather go to the dentist's than have their photograph taken?

Don't be a slave to your ground glass! Learn to pose your sitter, arrange your lighting, and make all your preparations before you bring your camera into play. You will get better negatives, better expression and - better orders!