ANOTHER National Conven-tion has passed into history and despite the fact that many thought it came at a time when photographers, especially commercial photographers were too busy to leave their studios, the attendance was very good. The entire registration was estimated by the secretary to be about 1350.

Flood conditions also had a bearing on attendance. One caravan of forty automobiles had been planned by Texas photographers but the trip had to be given up because the roads in the flooded section were impassable. There was not a large representation of eastern photographers but the north, south and central states were very well represented. And of course the manufacturers came from everywhere.

The plan of holding all of the meetings, lectures and demonstrations in a theatre in the morning and having the exhibits open only in the afternoon had distinctive advantages and worked out very satisfactorily. When there were lectures and demonstrations at the theatre everyone was there. And in the afternoons the photographer could visit the exhibition hall and feel sure that he was not missing any part of the program.

As an inducement to have everyone at the theatre on time each morning, coupons were handed to all those who entered the theatre before 9:30. A drawing was then held and four prizes were awarded, two to ladies and two to gentlemen. These daily awards for punctuality assured a good attendance at the beginning of each morning session.

Both the meetings and exhibits attracted a good attendance, however, and it is to be hoped that the plan will be continued at future conventions.

The great Kansas City Convention Hall was filled with the manufacturers' exhibits and the over-flow extended into the corridors. The decorative scheme was Japanese, the booths being constructed of bamboo. Japanese lanterns and parasols added the necessary touch of color and the entire scheme harmonized with the decorations of the tea garden where charming girls in bright colored kimonas served tea each afternoon.

The Eastman booth was especially attractive this year and it . held the big attraction for photographers in a wonderful collection of portraiture and commercial work on the new Vitava papers which are described on another page.

The prints were shown in large albums and these were displayed on tall racks which placed the prints on a level with the eye. The albums were illuminated by concealed lights and the arrangement was unusually attractive.

Judging by the interest shown in this one exhibit Vitava was an immediate favorite. The Etching Brown was shown both in contact prints and enlargements and the quality and tone of the prints were very pleasing. The Old Master surface of Vitava Athena added distinction to an excellent exhibit of portraits, and because of its unique surface attracted the most favorable comment among portrait photographers.

An excellent collection of commercial work was shown on the Vitava Athena Glossy and the quality of this paper immediately appealed to those who have always wanted a glossy paper of more than the usual quality.

But interest did not drop off with the exhibit of new papers. The Portrait Film exhibit was the most remarkable collection of negatives and positives that has ever been shown at a convention. There was a positive for every negative shown, and the big film exhibit covered almost every class of photographic work.

There were examples of outdoor and indoor home portraiture, studio portraiture, startling artificial and sunlight effects, fashion studies, interiors and a great variety of commercial subjects which were unusual and attractive. It was an exhibit that gave conclusive evidence of the quality and superiority of film for every class of subject which the photographer might encounter.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Winning Print By Thos. O'connor, R. R. Donnelly & Sons Co., Chicago.

Winning Print By Thos. O'connor, R. R. Donnelly & Sons Co., Chicago.

We heard one photographer say: "It's impossible - negatives were never made with such quality. Yet here they are, so I guess there is only one thing for me to do - use film". And just when one came to the conclusion that all of the finest negatives in the country had been put into that exhibit, it was completely changed and an entirely new lot of negatives and positives was displayed.

There was also an exhibit of studio apparatus, an 8 x 10 Projection Printer in operation, and the improved model of the Eastman Print Washer.

The big picture exhibits were arranged in the corridors at either side of the main hall and were of unusual interest. The work shown had all been passed upon before it was hung, with the possible exception of foreign exhibits, of which there were quite a number.

The Trophy Cup was won for the second time by the Middle Atlantic States Association.

An interesting feature of the commercial exhibit this year was the group of pictures competing for the National Biscuit Co. prize of $250.00, offered for the best advertising picture of Uneeda Biscuits. The prize was awarded to Thos. O'Connor of It. R. Donnelly & Sons Co., Chicago. There were a number of excellent pictures in the competition but Mr. O'Connor's picture was selected because of its simplicity of composition, its photographic quality and the excellent manner in which it pictured crackers with an appeal to one's appetite. Abels cup for the best collection of commercial photographs was won by Manning Bros, of Detroit.

The demonstrations at the Century Theatre by Will Towles, O. C. Conkling, H. W. Keedy, Chas. Aylett, T. T. Higgason, Martin Schweig, and W. M. Wade were all of them interesting and instructive as were also the lectures by Harry Wills, Mrs. Leah Moore, Howard D. Beach and the demonstration of the furnishing of a reception room by Ross Crane of the Art Institute of Chicago.

In the Commercial Section there were demonstrations and lectures by W. E. Dobbs, H. Hesse, Harry Devine, Howard Webster, J. C. Abel, and others. We couldn't be in two places at once and some of the demonstrations or lectures escaped us but they were all of them good.

There was also enough entertainment to liven things up and make everyone have a good time. It began with the reception and dance Monday evening and continued throughout the week.

On Tuesday evening "A Trip Through Filmland" was shown at the theatre followed by an entertainment by the M. V. P. A.

The Ladies' Luncheon Wednesday noon at the Muehlebach was followed by an automobile tour of Kansas City's boulevards. The ladies were the guests of the Manufacturers' Bureau. The Grand Annual Banquet and Dance at the Baltimore Thursday evening was a grand success, and there were a number of little informal dinner parties during the week which were very enjoyable.

The weather was fine, the arrangements good, the Kansas City photographers hospitable, the exhibits large and varied and the program an educational one.

The officers worked hard and deserved the praise they received for a very successful convention. The choice of a convention city for next year as well as the date of the convention has been left to the incoming Board of Officers and will be announced later.

The officers elected for 1923 are, President, A. H. Diehl, Sewickley, Pa., First Vice-President, Clarence Stearns, Rochester, Minn., Second Vice President, W. H. Koehne, Chicago, Third Vice-President, Mabel Cox Surdam, Pittsburg, Pa., Treasurer, Alva Townsend, Lincoln, Nebr., John Garabrant of N. Y. Chairman of the Commercial Section.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.