It was only in an intermittent and haphazard manner that advantage was taken in the various provinces of Canada of the codification of the law of sale of goods effected in the United Kingdom in 1893. In 1896 the Sale of Goods Act was adopted in Manitoba, in 1897 in British Columbia, in 1898 in the Northwest Territories of Canada (parts of which were in 1905 formed into the Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan), and in 1910 in Nova Scotia.

In 1918, pursuant to recommendations made by the Canadian Bar Association, the governments of some of the provinces of Canada appointed commissioners for the purpose of promoting uniformity of provincial legislation. In the same year these commissioners, together with representatives of most of the other provinces, met in conference for the first time, and brought into existence a permanent asso-sociation under the name of the Conference of Commissioners on Uniformity of Legislation in Canada. This body meets once a year to consider subjects with regard to which it seems desirable and practicable that there should be uniformity of provincial legislation. In the intervals between the meetings of the Conference drafts of model statutes on various subjects are prepared by committees, and these drafts are submitted for revision to the commissioners when they meet in annual conference.

At an early date after its formation the Conference drew attention to the fact that the Sale of Goods Act had been adopted in some of the provinces, but that New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Ontario still enjoyed the doubtful advantages of the uncodified English law relating to the sale of goods. As a result of the action of the Conference the statute was adopted in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island in 1919, and in Ontario in 1920. The Conference's committee on sale of goods and partnership reported in August, 1920, to the third annual meeting of the Conference, in part, as follows:

1. Your committee, consisting of the commissioners from Ontario, is glad to be able to report further substantial progress in the direction of securing uniformity of legislation on the subject of Sale of Goods and Partnership.

2. As mentioned in the report of your committee presented to the conference in 1919, the Sale of Goods Act, 1893, was adopted in New Brunswick and in Prince Edward Island in 1919, at the instance of the commissioners from these provinces respectively. Pursuant to the recommendation of the Conference made in 1919, and at the instance of the Ontario commissioners, the statute was adopted in Ontario in 1920. The result is that the statute is now in force in all the provinces of Canada except Quebec.

3. It is of interest to note that the Sale of Goods Act, 1893, originally enacted to codify the law of the United Kingdom, has been adopted in the following British dominions :

1895. Barbados, Gibraltar, Jamaica, Isle of Man, New .Zealand, South Australia, Trinidad and Tobago, Western Australia.

1896. Ceylon, Hong-Kong, Manitoba, Queensland. Tasmania, Victoria.

1897. British Columbia.

1898. Northwest Territories of Canada (then including Alberta and Saskatchewan) ;

1899. British Honduras, Newfoundland; 1904. Bahamas;

1910. Nova Scotia; 1913. British Guiana;

1919. New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island;

1920. Ontario.

4. As noted in last year's report of this committee, the Factors Act, 1889, enacted by the British Parliament, had been adopted in Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Saskatchewan. Pursuant to the recommendation of the Conference it was also adopted in Prince Edward Island in 1920, at the instance of the commissioners from that province. Your committee is informed that it will probably be adopted in Manitoba in 1921. In Quebec, articles 1735-1754 of the Civil Code of Lower Canada are based upon the former British legislation, superseded in the United Kingdom by the Factors Act of 1889.

(Note: The rest of the report relates to the subject of partnership. As a result of the action of the Conference the Partnership Act, 1890, which codified the general law of partnership in the United Kingdom, was adopted in New Brunswick, Ontario and Prince Edward Island in 1920, and is now in force in all the provinces of Canada except Quebec. In Quebec the subjects of sale of goods and partnership are governed by the Civil Code of Lower Canada. In Newfoundland the Partnership Act was adopted in 1892 and the Sale of Goods Act, as already mentioned, in 1899).