Mere omission to act cannot amount to part performance.1 Thus, where a vendor who has reserved the right of taking growing timber off the land sold for a certain time, subsequently makes an oral contract with his vendee for an extension of such time, his omission to take the timber off in the time specified in the original contract, though in reliance on the oral contract is not part performance.2 If, however, omission to act amounts to a release of a property right, as where a widow refrains from claiming any interest in her deceased husband's estate under oral contract with the heirs,3 the contract price of such interest thus waived may be recovered.

12 East Tennessee, etc., Ry. v. Davis, 91 Ala. 615; 8 So. 349.

13 See Sec. 706.

14 Pressley v. Roe, 83 la. 545; 50 N. W. 44.

15Niles v. Welsh, 89 la. 491; 56 N. W. 657; Pressley v. Roe, 83 la. 545; 50 N. W. 44.

16 Devin v. Eagleson, 79 la. 269; 44 N. W. 545.

17Daily v. Minnick, 117 la. 563; 60. L. R. A. 840; 91 N. W. 913.

18 Mitchell v. Colby. 95 la. 202; 35 L. R. A. 379; 63 N. W. 769.

19 Harlan v. Harlan, 102 la. 701; 72 N. W. 286.

20 Oliver v. Powell,. 114 Ga. 592; 40 S. E. 826.

21 Query v. Liston. 92 la. 288; 60 N. W. 524. So where such deposit was made without the knowledge or assent of the vendor. Mathes v. Bell, 121 la. 722: 96 N. W. 1093.

22 Benedict v. Bird, 103 la. 612; 72 N. W. 768.

1 Augusta Southern R. R. v. Smith, etc., Co., 106 Ga. 864; 33 S. E. 28.