The express approval of an account on the part of the debtor amounts to an account stated.1 It is not necessary that the assent of the debtor should be shown by express words however. Any circumstances which show that he assents to the correctness of such account as a valid and subsisting obligation, are sufficient.2 The fact that the debtor gives his notes to the creditor for the balance shown by the account, is sufficient to convert the original account into an account stated.3

6 Tucker v. Barrow, 7 Barn. & C. 623.

7 Tucker v. Barrow, 7 Barn. & C. 623.

8 Chisman v. Count. 2 Man. & G. 307: Wiggins v. Burkham. 77 U. S. (10 Wall.) 129. 10 L. ed. 884.

9Sergeant v. Ewing. 36 Pa. St. 156.

10 Kennedy v. Withers. 3 Barn. & Ad. 767; Weigel v. Hartman Steel Co. 51 N. J. L. 446. 20 Atl. 67.

11 Kennedy v. Withers, 3 Barn. & Ad. 767.

12Kimraerle v. Lowitz, - Mich. - . 169 N. W. 857.

13 Kimmerle v. Lowitz, - Mich. - , 169 N. W. 857.

1 Roy v. King's Estate, 55 Mont. 567, 179 Pac. 821.

2 Wilbur v. Win, 89 N. J. Eq. 278, 103 Atl. 985.

3 Fryer v. Roe, 12 C. B. 437; Evering-ham v. Halsey, 108 Ia. 709. 78 X. W. 220: Hallowell Granite Works v. Orleans. - - La. - , 80 So. 610; Seabury v. Bolles. 5l N. J. L. 103, 11 L. R. A. 136, 16 Atl. 54.