An arbitrator acts in a quasi-judicial capacity, and accordingly he is not liable for lack of skill, lack of due care, and the like, although an agent would be liable under similar circumstances. In England and the United States, it is generally held that an arbitrator incurs no personal liability for a lack of due care or skill,1 or for negligence in performing his functions as arbitrator.2 In the United States it is generally said that the arbitrator's position is so much like that of a judge that he is not liable personally, even in case of fraud or willful misconduct on his part.3

12 Hartford Fire Ins. Co. v. Bonner Mercantile Co., 44 Fed. 151, 11 L. R. A. 623; Brymer v. Clark, 20 O. S. 231; Canfield v. Watertown Fire Ins. Co., 55 Wis. 419, 13 N. W. 252; Contra, Colin v. Wemme, 47 Or. 146, 81 Pac. 981.

13 Turner v. Hartford Fire Ins. Co.,

- Ia. - , 172 N. W. 166.

14 Turner v. Hartford Fire Ins. Co.,

- Ia. - , 172 N. W. 166.

1 See Sec. 2538.

2 See Sec. 2536 et seq.

3 Chicago, R. I. & P. Ry. Co. v. Union

Pac. R. Co., 254 Fed. 235; Ramish v. Marsh, - Cal. - , 172 Pac. 1100.

4 Chicago, R. I. & P. Ry. Co. v. Union Pac. R. Co., 254 Fed. 235.

5 Ramish v. Marsh. - Cal. - , 172 Pac. 1100.

1 Chambers v. Goldthorpe [1901], 1 K. B. 624; Hutchins v. Merrill, 100 Me. 313, 42 L. R. A. (N.S.) 277, 84 Atl. 412.

2 Hutchins v. Merrill, 109 Me. 313, 42 I. R. A. (N.S.) 277, 84 Atl. 412.

3Hoosac Tunnel, Dock & Elevator Co. v. O'Brien, 137 Mass. 424, 60 Am. Rep. 323.