In Fig. 276, let A B C D be the elevation of a portion of cornice, and let G H K be the plan of any angle around which the cornice is to be carried, a pattern being required for an arm of the miter. Complete the plan by drawing the lines E F ami F L, intersecting at F, giving the correct projection of the molding from G H and H K. and then draw the miter line between the points H and F. It will be observed that the arm G H F E has been projected directly from the profile A B, thus placing profile and plan in correct relation to each other. Divide the profile A

B in the usual manner into any convenient number of parts, and from the points thus obtained drop lines vertically on to the miter line in the plan F H, as shown. At right angles to this arm of the cornice, as shown in plan, lay off a stretchout of the profile, as shown by N M, through the points in which draw the usual measuring lines, as indicated. Place the T-square parallel to this line, or, what is the same, at right angles to E F, and, bringing it successively against the points in F H, cut measuring lines of corresponding numbers. Then a line traced through the points thus obtained, as shown by O P, will be the pattern sought. As intimated at the outset of this problem, the angle G H K represents any angle whatever, and the course to be pursued is exactly the same whether it be acute or obtuse. Of course the more acute the angle G H K the longer will the miter line H F become, as may be ascertained by experiment, producing a corresponding increase in the projection of the different parts of the pattern from the line N M.

Fig. 276.   A Return Miter at Other than a Right Angle, as in a Cornice at the Corner of a Building.

Fig. 276. - A Return Miter at Other than a Right Angle, as in a Cornice at the Corner of a Building.