CARL H. CLARK

The launch to be described is of a type which has lately become very popular among users of launches. It is 21 ft. long, 5 ft. 8 in. wide, and draws about 2 ft. of water. It is a very comfortable boat for pleasure sailing, as, while sufficiently seaworthy to endure severe weather, it is not bo large as to require a large, heavy and expensive engine with the consequent heavy expense for fuel. The small cabin will shelter five or six people in a shower, or will afford comfortable cruising accommodations for three. The cabin, if not required, could be omitted and the awning and seats run forward instead. The boat is exceptionally roomy for one of her size and is of very easy form, which materially lessens the labor of building and brings it within the scope of amateur builders.

Table Of Off-Sets

Numbers of Moulds.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Stern

Ht. of sheer line above base line

5 '

0 "

4'

7 5/8"

4'

4 1/8"

4'

1 7/8"

4'

Of"

4'

01"

4'

4 "

4'

3 3/8|"

Ht. of rabbet line above base line

1 '

41"

1'

1 "

0'

11 3/8"

0'

101"

0'

101"

1'

11 1/4"

V

41"

2'

6 1/4"

Ht. of keel bottom above base line

1 '

01"

0'

9 "

0'

7 "

0'

6 "

0'

5 "

0'

4 "

0'

3 "

2'

5 "

Half breadth on deck

1 '

8 "

2'

4|"

2'

81"

2'

10 "

2'

10 "

2'

81"

2'

41"

1'

11 3/8"

Half breadth on w. 1. 2a

1 '

2 "

2'

1 3/8"

2'

7 1/4"

2'

9 3/8"

2'

9|"

2'

7 3/8"

2'

31"

1'

6 "

Half breadth w. 1. la

1 '

0|"

2'

0 "

2'

61"

2'

8 5/8"

2'

8*"

2'

6 5/8"

2'

1 5/8"

0'

4 3/4"

Half breadth 1. w. 1.

0 '

11 1/8"

V

10 1/4"

2'

5 "

2'

71"

2'

71"

2'

5 "

1'

81"

Half breadth w. 1. 16

0 '

81"

V

7 3/8"

2'

2 3/4"

2'

51"

2'

51"

2'

2 "

1'

01"

Half breadth w. 1. 26

0 '

51"

V

2f"

V

101"

2'

2 "

2'

2 "

1'

71"

0'

41"

Half breadth w. 1. 36

0'

51"

V

1 1/2"

1'

61"

1'

61"

0'

91"

Taking off table

Water lines are spaced 4" apart.

Moulds are spaced 2' 6" apart.

Base line is 2'3" below 1. w. 1.

While the building of this boat is more complicated than any of the others which have appeared in these columns, there is no reason why any amateur who is used to tools should not be able to build it, especially if he has followed the previous descriptions and, perhaps, built some of the boats outlined therein. It is hoped that even those without previous experience in boat building will find the directions entirely clear.

Plate 1 gives the usual drawing of the " lines " as they are usually given to boat builders. These will be familiar to all from the previous descriptions, and the first work will be to reproduce, in full size, as much of this drawing as is necessary to obtain the shape of the various moulds used in the building.

The first step will be to lay out the outline of the keel and stem and of the moulds full size on a smooth floor. This is accomplished from the dimensions given in the " laying off table ". The space chosen must be at least 22 ft. long and 6 ft. wide. A base line is drawn near one edge, and care must be used to have this line straight, which can be done either by snapping it in with a chalk line or by stretching a thread and marking several points and connecting these with a straight edge. It is very convenient to fasten a straight batten with its edge at the base line, thus enabling measurements to be laid off more easily, as the end of the rule may be placed against the batten, with the certainty that it is always even with the base line. The 1. w. 1. is next laid off 2 ft. 3 in. above the base line and parallel with it, water lines la and 2a are drawn 4 and 8 in. above the 1. w. 1 , and water lines 16, 26 and 36 are drawn 4, 8 and 12 in. below it and parallel with it. The cross sections, or mould lines, are drawn square with the base line and 2 ft. and 6 in. apart, numbering them as in the drawing. This drawing may, if desired, be done on a large sheet of paper one 5 ft. wide being sufficient, with the base line at its extreme edge. For drawing curved lines a batten, of pine or other flexible wood, about 1 in. square will be required; it is held in place by small wire nails driven

Table fob laying out stem.

Rabbet.

Face of stem.

Deck

2 ft.

81 in

3 ft.

0 in

W. I.

2a

2 "

7 1/2 "

2 "

11 1/2 "

W. 1.

la

2 "

5 5/8 "

2 "

9 3/4"

L. w. 1.

2 "

2 1/2 "

1 "

7 3/8"

W. 1.

16

1 '•

9 "

2 "

3 1 /4"

W. 1.

26

1 "

0 "

1 "

9 3/8 "

W. 1

36

0 "

11 1/4 "

through it into the floor. The outline of the keel bottom is first obtained from line 3 of the laying off table, by laying up from the base line on each mould line the distance given under the number at the top; for instance, on mould line No. 1, we should set up 1 ft. 9 1/2 in,; on No. 2, 9 in.; on No. 3, 7 in. and so on. It will be noted that the keel is straight from the after end as far forward as No. 3 when it begins to curve upwards and merges into the curve of the stem.

Table Of Off Sets 69

The outlines of the outside of the stem and the rabbet in the stem are next to be laid off; there are obtained by setting out horizontally from mould station No. 1 on each waterline the distances given above.

The top of the stem is 5 ft. 5 1/2 in. above base line, and this height will first be laid off; then the distance 2 ft. 8 1/2 in. from the table will be measured off horizontally from mould station 1 at this level for the upper end of the rabbet line, and 3 ft. 9 in. for the upper corner of the stem. Coming down now to w. 1. 2a, the distances 2 ft. 7 1/2 in. for the rabbet and 2 ft. 11 1/2 in. for the face of the stem are laid off in the same way along w. 1. 2a, and so on until all are measured off. The two curves are then struck in with a limber batten, the outer one joining that of the keel bottom already drawn.

The rabbet line is next laid off from the dimensions of line 2 in the table, in the same manner as the keel bottom. It crosses the 1. w. 1. 2 ft. 1 1/4 in. back from mould No. 7 and ends on the stern 2 ft. 10 1/8 in. back from No. 7 and, as noted in the table, 2 ft. 6 1/4 in. above base line. The curve can now be drawn in, joining that already drawn at the bow. It remains now to draw in the outlines of the stern post. The end of the stern post is on such an angle that if it were continued to the 1. w. 1. it would cut it 1 ft. 3 1/2 in. back from No. 7. The outline of the under side of the overhang should run along about | in. below the rabbet and curve into the straight of the stern post, as shown in the line drawing. The line giving the angle of the sternboard should also be drawn, the top of it being 4 ft. 3f in. above the base line, and 5 ft. 9 in. back from No. 7.

The shape of each mould is now to be laid out from the table. The base line, water lines and a center line square with them, as laid out; turning to the table and taking mould No. 4 as an example, we find the height at sheer line from line 1 to be 4 ft. l 7/8 in., and the half breadth at the deck height from line 4 to be 2 ft. 10 in. These two locate the upper end. Coming down to w. 1. 2a, we find the half breadth in line 5 to be 2 ft. 9 3/8 in. and on w. 1. la from line 6 to be 2 ft. 6 5/8 in. and so on for the remainder of the water lines.

Since the mould line ends at the rabbet line, the height of the rabbet line 2 will give the lower end of the mould line, and as the keel is 3 in. thick, this lower ending will also be 1 1/2 in. out from the center line. The remainder of the moulds and the stern outlines are laid out in the same manner. As the "lines" are laid out to the outside of the plank, and we desire our moulds to the inside, we must take off the thickness of the plank, in., parallel with the outline just drawn. It is to this outline that the mould is to be made. It will be noticed that Nos. 4and 5 are alike except in the height at the upper end, thus enabling one pattern to serve for both.

A pattern or mould of thin stock is to be made, of the stem, keel and deadwood, to the form laid out on the floor. It should be of the shape enclosed by the keel bottom and the rabbet, one edge representing each. The same is true of the stem mould, the outside edge representing the face of the stem, and the inside representing the rabbet. The stem mould should be joined to the keel mould in the proper position, and well braced so that it may be carried abont without danger of springing out of shape. A short piece also should be fastened at the after end to show the angle of the stern board. A mould must also be made to the shape of each cross-section. They are made of rough stock and are, of course, double for both sides; they must be strong and well braced as they are depended upon to hold the shape of the boat during building.

The next issue will deal with the getting out of the keel and stern and setting up the boat.