The means usually employed by most beginners to obtain the correct outline of an object, such as tracing or a pantograph, make them dependent on mechanical help rather than train the eye to form and proportion a drawing correctly. The device shown not only greatly assists the beginner, but actually trains him toward a point where he can dispense with any such device and correctly sketch by free hand. It also has the effect of encouraging the beginner, because his first efforts will not be complete failures, as is usually the case.

An Aid in Sketching Profiles 744

The device consists of a rather fine wire bent in the shape of a human profile and supported on a stand or base. The stand may be dispensed with, however, and the wire held in the hand. In use, it is placed near the model or person whose profile is to be drawn; then, after closing one eye, it is set at a position where it will correspond to the features of the model. This enables one to note the variations between the wire and the model's features. For instance, the forehead may recede from the wire at the top, or the nose may have a different slant or shape.

Section On A A Layout for the Casing. Cover and Wheel for the Construction of a Hydraulic Motor That will Drive a Small Dynamo, to Produce Current for Experimental Purposes, to Charge Storage Cells or to Run Electric Toys

Ill: Section On A A Layout for the Casing. Cover and Wheel for the Construction of a Hydraulic Motor That will Drive a Small Dynamo, to Produce Current for Experimental Purposes, to Charge Storage Cells or to Run Electric Toys

The paper on which the drawing is to be made should have a faint outline drawn by laying the wire upon it and marking around it with a soft pencil. Having noted the variations between the wire and the features, proceed to draw the profile, observing the same variations, and when the sketch is completed, erase the faint outlines. Then compare the drawing with the model without using the wire, and make final corrections. The dotted line indicates the outline to be erased.

The drawing may be made larger or smaller than the bent wire, but the outline on the paper must be kept in exactly the same proportion. It is not necessary that the wire be bent so that it represents perfect features. With the use of this device one forms a habit of comparing and proportioning, which applies to the correct sketching of all objects. - Contributed by Will L. Burner, Columbus, Ohio.