Very often the amateur craftsman comes across a picture which he would like to have framed, but the difficulty and insecurity of the ordinary miter joint for the corners discourage him from trying to make the frame. A very easy way to construct a rigid frame is shown in the illustration. The size of the frame must be determined by the picture to be framed. The width, A, of the pieces depends upon one's own taste.

Four pieces, the desired length and width and 1/2 in. thick, should be dressed out of the material intended for the frame. Four other pieces, % in. thick and 1/2 in.- narrower than the first four pieces, are next made ready and fastened with glue and flat-head screws to the back of the first pieces, as shown. This allows % in. for glass, picture and backing, and 1/2 in. to lap over the front of the picture on all edges.

By arranging the pieces as shown in Fig. 1, a strong corner lap is secured.

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Square and Mitered Lap Joints for Making Rigid Picture Frames in Natural or Stained Woods

Ill: Square and Mitered Lap Joints for Making Rigid Picture Frames in Natural or Stained Woods

A miter lap joint which is not so strong is shown in Fig. 2. The latter gives a mitered-joint effect. This method does away with the use of the rabbeting plane and miter box, both of which are difficult to use with accuracy. Two screws should be used in each joint to reinforce the glue. - Contributed by James Gaffney, Chicago, Ill.