Class Of Track.

Single-track mileage.

Per cent of total.

Total.....................................................

*22,589.47

100.0

First main track

16,651.58

73.7

Second main track

5,030.36

22.3

Sidings and turnouts

907.53

4.0

Overhead trolley

21.302.57

94.3

Other electric power

611.44

2.7

Compressed air

6.06

(†)

Animal

529.10

1.1

Cable......................

240.69

1.1

Steam

169.61

.8

Trackage owned

19,038.33

84.3

Trackage leased

3,551.14

15.7

Operated under trackage rights

560.92

2.5

Constructed and opened for operation during the year

1,549.73

6.9

On private right of way owned by company.........................

3,424.96

15.2

On private right of way not owned by company.........................

377.11

1.7

Located within city limits.......................................

‡13,208.24

65.8

Located outside city limits.......................................

‡6.855.58

34.2

Equipped with cast welded joints

1,642.68

7.3

*Includes 12.48 miles of track duplicated in reports of different companies.

† Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent.

‡ Exclusive of the mileage of Massachusetts.

Of the total single-track mileage, 21,914.01 miles, or 97 per cent, were operated by electric power and 416.36 miles, or 1.9 per cent, by other mechanical traction, while only 259.10 miles, or 1.1 per cent, were operated by animal power, as compared with 69.7 per cent in 1890. Of the total trackage in use by all companies, 84.3 per cent was owned by the operating companies and 15.7 per cent leased. The mileage of track constructed and opened for operation during the year covered by this report was 1,549.73 miles, or 6.9 per cent of the total, but this does not cover all of the track under construction. A number of miles of track were in various stages of completion, but it was impracticable to fix upon any stage of the work at which the trackage could be enumerated other than that of actual completion. The statistics concerning track located on private right of way refer particularly to rural electric railways, many of which have bought or have had surrendered to them a separate roadbed, either adjoining or independent of the highway, in the same manner as a steam railroad. It appears from the reports that 3,424.96 miles of single track were on private right of way owned by the company. Occasionally the railway is built on a private right of way not owned by the company, an example of which would be a toll bridge owned by a bridge company, to whom payment for the privilege of using it was made. There were 377.11 miles of single track on right of way of this character.

The inquiries concerning the location of track, whether within or without city limits, were made with the intention of ascertaining the relative length of track operated in urban and rural districts, respectively. In a number of cases it was impossible to determine exactly the trackage that should be assigned to these two subdivisions. In some instances the track was within or passed through thickly settled communities that were not organized as cities or towns, and therefore had no legal limits, and it was difficult to obtain the length that should be considered as within the urban district. In the New England states densely populated communities are legally part of the town government, which includes also rural districts. Many companies in Massachusetts reported that it was impracticable to make the distinction, and accordingly the trackage for that state has not been included in this classification. For the United States, exclusive of Massachusetts, 13,208.24 miles of single trackage, or 65.8 per cent of the total, were reported as within urban limits and 6,855.58 miles, or 34.2 per cent, as outside of such limits.

The increase in the trackage is due net only to the establishment of new companies, but very largely to the extension of the lines of established companies.