The anvil-stock, which is pyramidal in shape, and the total weight of which amounts to 500 tons, is composed of superposed courses, each formed of one or two blocks of cast iron. Each course and every contact was very carefully planed in order to make sure of a perfect fitting of the parts; and all the different blocks were connected by means of mortises, by hot bandaging, and by joints with key-pieces, in such a way as to effect a perfect solidity of the parts and to make the whole compact and impossible to get out of shape.

The anvil-stock was afterwards surrounded by a filling-in of masonry composed of rag-stones and a mortar made of cement and hydraulic lime. This masonry also forms the foundation for the standards of the hammer, and is capped with dressed stone to receive the bed-plates.

The Power-Hammer (Figs. A and B).--The power-hammer, properly so-called, consists, in addition to the hammer-head, of two standards to whose inner sides are bolted guides upon which slides the moving mass. The bed-plates of cast iron are 28 inches thick, and are independent of the anvil-stock. They are set into the bed of dressed stone capping the foundation, and are connected together by bars of iron and affixed to the masonry by foundation bolts. To these bedplates are affixed the standards by means of bolts and keys. The two standards are connected together by iron plates four inches in thickness, which are set into the metal and bolted to it so as to secure the utmost strength and solidity. The platform which connects the upper extremities of the standards supports the steam cylinder and the apparatus for distributing the steam. The latter consists of a throttle valve, twelve inches in diameter, and an eduction valve eighteen inches in diameter, the maneuvering of which is done by means of rods extending down to a platform upon which the engineman stands. This platform is so situated that all orders can be distinctly heard by the engineman, and so that he shall be protected from the heat radiated by the steel that is being forged. All the maneuvers of the hammers are effected with most wonderful facility and with the greatest precision.

The piston is of cast-steel, and the rod is of iron, 12 inches in diameter. The waste steam is carried out of the mill by a pipe, and, before being allowed to escape into the atmosphere, is directed into an expansion pipe which it penetrates from bottom to top. Here a portion of the water condenses and flows off, and the steam then escapes into the open air with a greatly diminished pressure. The object of this arrangement is to diminish to a considerable extent the shocks and disagreeable noise that would be produced by the direct escape of the steam at quite a high pressure and also to avoid the fall of condensed water.

The following are a few details regarding the construction of the hammer:

 Total height of foundations........... 26 ft.

From the ground to the platform ...... 28 " 
Platform .............................. 3.25 " Height of cylinder.................... 21 " ________
Total height...................... 78.25 ft.
Weight of anvil-stock................ 500 tons. Weight of bed-plates................. 122 " Weight of standards.................. 270 " Weight of platform and cylinder...... 148 " Piston, valves, engineman's platform, hammer, etc........................ 160 " __________
Total weight................... 1,200 tons.
Weight of the hammer.................. 80 tons. Maximum fall.......................... 25.75 ft. Distance apart of the standards....... 21.6 " Width of hammer....................... 6 " Pressure of steam..................... 16 lb. Effective pressure to lift 80 tons.... 7 "
Description of Figures.--A, the 80-ton hammer; B, B1, B2, cranes; C, C1, C2, supports of cranes; D, D1, D2, gas furnaces; A1, the 35-ton hammer; A2, the 28-ton hammer; EE, railways; F, engineman's platform; G, lever for maneuvering the throttle valve; H, an ingot being forged.