The illustrations we give represent an expansion trap by Mr. Hyde, and made by Mr. S. Farron, Ashton-under-Lyne. The general appearance of this arrangement is as in Fig. 1 or Fig. 3, the center view, Fig. 2, showing what is the cardinal feature of the trap, viz., that it contains a collector for silt, sand, or sediment which is not, as in most other traps, carried out through the valve with the efflux of water. The escape valve also is made very large, so that while the trap may be made short, or, in other words, the expansion pipe may not be long, a tolerably large area of outlet is obtained with the short lift due to the small movement of the expansion pipe.

IMPROVED STEAM TRAP.

IMPROVED STEAM TRAP.

The object of a steam trap is for the removal of water of condensation without allowing the escape of steam from drying apparatus and steam pipes used for heating, power, or other purposes. One of the plans employed is by an expansion pipe having a valve fixed to its end, so that when the pipe shortens from being cooler, due to the presence of the water, the valve opens and allows the escape of the water until the steam comes to the trap, which, being hotter, lengthens the pipe and closes the valve. Now with this kind of trap, and, in fact, with any variety of trap, we understand that it has been frequently the experience of the user to find his contrivance inoperative because the silt or sand that may be present in the pipes has been carried to the valve and lodged there by the water, causing it to stick, and with expansion traps not to close properly or to work abnormally some way or other. The putting of these contrivances to rights involves a certain amount of trouble, which is completely obviated by the arrangement shown in the annexed engravings, which is certainly a simple, strong, and substantial article. The foot of the trap is made of cast iron, the seat of the valve being of gun metal, let into the diaphragm, cast inside the hollow cylinder.

The valve, D, is also of gun metal, and passing to outside through a stuffing box is connected to the central expansion pipe by a nut at E. The valve is set by two brass nuts at the top, so as to be just tight when steam hot; if, then, from the presence of water the trap is cooled, the pipe contracts and the water escapes. A mud door is provided, by which the mud can be removed as required. The silt or dirt that may be in the pipes is carried to the trap by the water, and is deposited in the cavity, as shown, the water rises, and when the valve, D, opens escapes at the pipe, F, and may be allowed to run to waste. A pipe is not shown attached to F, but needless to say one may be connected and led anywhere, provided the steam pressure is sufficient. For this purpose the stuffing-box is provided; it is really not required if the water runs to waste, as is represented in the engraving. To give our readers some idea of the dimensions of the valve, we may say that the smallest size of trap has 1 in. expansion pipe and a valve 3 in. diameter, the next size 1¼ in. expansion pipe and a valve 4½ in. diameter, and the largest size has a pipe 1½ in. and a valve 6 in. diameter.

Altogether, the contrivance has some important practical advantages to recommend it. - Mech. World.