We illustrate to-day a new application of electricity to railroad crossing signaling which the Pennsylvania Steel Company, of Steelton, Pa., has just perfected. By its operation an isolated highway crossing in the woods or any lonely place can be made perfectly safe, and that, too, without the expense of gates and a man to work them or of a flagman. It is surely a great improvement over the old methods, and it is likely to have a large sale. In addition to considerations of safety, possible saving in salaries to railroad companies by its use will be great. This device is more reliable than a human being, and can make any crossing safe to which it is applied. Its operation is described as follows:

FIG. 2.   MAGNETO ELECTRIC CROSSING SIGNAL

FIG. 2. - MAGNETO-ELECTRIC CROSSING SIGNAL

The illustration shows the device as used on a single track railroad, where it is so arranged as to be operated only by trains approaching the crossing (i.e., in the form illustrated, from the right). A similar box on the other side of the crossing is used for trains approaching in the other direction. Two plates connected by a link, and pivoted, are placed alongside of one rail, close enough to it to be depressed by the treads of the wheels. By another link, one of the plates called the rock plate (the one to the right) is connected to a rock shaft which extends through a strong bearing into the heavy iron case or box shown, at a suitable distance from the rail, within which an electric generator is placed; the whole being mounted and secured upon the ends of two long ties framed to receive it.

The action of this rock plate is peculiar. It is pivoted at the rear end, not to a fixed point, but to a short crank arm, the bearing for which is inclosed in the small box shown. As the first wheel of a train which is approaching in the desired direction (from the right in the engraving) touches it, it will be seen that it must not only depress it, but produce a slight forward motion, causing a corresponding rotary motion in the rock shaft which actuates the apparatus. On the other hand, when a train is approaching from the other direction, or has already passed the crossing, its wheels strike first the curved plate to the left of the illustration, and by means of the peculiar link connections shown, depress the rock plate so as to clear the wheels before the wheels touch it, but the depression is directly vertical, so that it does not give any horizontal motion to it, which would have the effect of actuating the rock shaft. Consequently, trains pass over the apparatus in one direction without having any effect upon it whatever, the different point at which the same force is applied to the rock plate giving the latter an entirely different motion.

FIG. 2.   MAGNETO ELECTRIC CROSSING SIGNAL

FIG. 2. - MAGNETO-ELECTRIC CROSSING SIGNAL

The slight rotary motion which is in this way communicated to the rock shaft, when a train is approaching in the right direction, compresses a spring inside the case. As each wheel passes off the rock plate, the reaction of the spring throws it up again to its former position, giving additional speed to the gearing within, which is set in motion at the passage of the first wheel, and operates the electric "generator." The spring is really the motive power of the alarm. A small but heavy fly-wheel is connected with the apparatus, the top of which is just visible in the engraving, which serves to store up power to run the "generator," which is nothing more than a small dynamo, for the necessary number of seconds after the rear of the train has passed. The dynamo dispenses with all need for batteries, and reduces the work of maintenance to occasionally refilling the oil-cups and noticing if any part has been broken.

A suitable wire circuit is provided, commencing at the generator with insulated and protected wire, and continued with ordinary telegraph wire, which can be strung on telegraph poles or trees leading to the electric gong, Fig. 2, which rings as long as the armature revolves. It is a simple matter so to proportion the mechanism for the required distance and speed that the revolutions of the armature and the ringing of the gong shall continue until the train reaches the crossing; and as each wheel acts upon the apparatus, the more wheels there are in the train the longer the bell will ring, a very convenient property, since the slowest trains have nearly always the most wheels. The practical limits to the ringing of the gong are that it will stop sounding after the head of the train has passed the crossing and before or very soon after the rear has passed. A "wild" engine running very slowly might not actuate the signal as long as was desirable, but even then it is not unreasonably claimed the warning would probably last long enough for all practical requirements, as a team approaching a crossing at eight miles per hour takes 42 seconds to go 500 feet.

All the bearings of any importance are self-lubricated by oil cups, the whole apparatus being designed to require inspection not more than once a month. The iron case when shut is water-tight, and when duly locked cannot be maliciously tampered with without breaking open the case; so that, the manufacturers claim, it will not be essential to examine it more than once a month. The parts outside the case are all strong and heavy, and not likely to get out of order, while easily inspected.

The apparatus can be used for announcing trains as well as sounding alarms, as the gongs can be placed upon any post or building. The gong has a heavy striker, and makes a great deal of noise, so that no one should fail to hear it. - Railway Review.