The function of a window is essentially, twofold-to admit light and air. Naturally that arrangement of windows will be most reasonable which provides for the best diffusion of light and the best ventilation with the least amount of glass space. For, while it is poor economy to have too few windows, it is also poor economy to have too many.

It has been found that for effective results, a sort of flexible relation exists between the amount of window space to be used and the size of the room to be lighted. Accordingly, the total window area for a kitchen should in general be about 25 per cent of the floor area. For example, a kitchen 11 by 11 feet, having 121 square feet of floor area, should be provided with about 30 square feet of window space, arranged on the two outer walls. This space may be divided into two windows 3 by 5 feet each, or three windows 2 1/2 by 4 feet each, or three windows 2 by 4 1/2 feet each, as the case may require. The necessary window space for any given kitchen may thus be approximated.

Plate X

Plate X

A good kitchen arrangement.

Ordinarily, kitchen windows should be located as far apart as possible. In the case of a corner exposure, they should be placed near the partition walls rather than near the corner of the house. This arrangement insures a strong diagonal sweep of air and an even distribution of light. The tops of the windows should be not more than a foot from the ceiling, so that the rising heat and odors can easily escape. Broad, short windows, built high from the floor, are an excellent type for kitchen use. The distance from the floor to the sill should be from three to four feet, in order to allow for table space beneath the windows. While not so picturesque as casements, double-hung windows are usually the easier type to operate in a kitchen.