Much interest is added to the study of vegetables by the examination of a seed catalogue easily obtainable from a firm selling seeds and plants. In this way, one may increase one's knowledge of varieties for planting in the home garden, even if they are not common on the market. City markets offer an increasing variety of vegetables, and the purchaser should not hesitate to buy a vegetable because it is new to her. An inexpensive Italian vegetable, fenucchi, is now sometimes found on sale, and its characteristic flavor is very agreeable.

A. Fowler, Photographer.

A. Fowler, Photographer.

Fig. 36. - 100-Calorie portions of vegetables.

Kind

Weight of Portion, ounces

Asparagus

..........................................................

16

Beets

...........................................................

10

Cabbage

...........................................................

13

Carrots

..........................................................

10

Corn

..........................................................

9

Cucumbers

..........................................................

20

Lettuce

.............................................................

22

Onions

.........................................................

8

Potatoes

..............................................................

5

Spinach

.............................................................

15

Tomatoes

...........................................................

15

The season of vegetables is so extended by canning, by the shipping of vegetables from the South, and by growing under glass that there is always a wide range of choice. There are in winter, however, some tempting delicacies in the way of green vegetables that the buyer with a limited purse should pass by. A cucumber at fifty cents or even at ten cents is not a sensible purchase. Lettuce, grown under glass, at ten cents a head is not an extravagance, if the income allows thirty-five to forty cents per capita per day for food. As a rule, select the less expensive vegetable, provided it is in good condition. The prices are so fluctuating that a definite statement is impossible. (See Chapter XVII (The Cost And Purchasing Of Food).)

Root vegetables should be uniform in size, sound, the skins fair.

Head vegetables should be solid, with but few waste leaves on the outside.

Vegetables with hard rind should be sound and firm.

Asparagus should be even in size, the stalks not bitten by insects.

Cauliflower should be firm and white, not affected by insects or blight.

Celery should be firm and white, free from blemishes, fine in texture.

Peas should have crisp pods well filled, but not too full.

String beans should be crisp and snap easily.

All leaf vegetables should be crisp - not wilted.