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Twenty-Five Cent Dinners For Families Of Six | by Juliet Corson



The food most generally in use among the masses is just that which meets their requirements. No hungry man will spend money for what he knows will not satisfy his appetite, and a natural appetite may always be trusted. For that reason the receipts given in this book treat of the articles in common use, with the exception of lentils and macaroni, which are foods that I earnestly beg all to try.

TitleTwenty-Five Cent Dinners For Families Of Six
AuthorJuliet Corson
PublisherOrange Judd Company
Year1879
Copyright1878, Juliet Corson
AmazonTwenty-Five Cent Dinners

By Juliet Corson, Superintendent Of The New York Cooking School, Author Of "The Cooking Manual," "Our Household Council," "The Bill Of Fare, With Accompanying Receipts And Estimated Cost," "A Text-Book For Cooking Schools," "Fifteen-Cent Dinners For Workingmen's Families," Etc.

Thirteenth Edition, Revised And Enlarged.

-Preface To The Revised And Enlarged Edition
During the time that this little book has been a candidate for public favor, it has attained a success far beyond the expectations of its most sanguine advocates; and in issuing this revised and enlar...
-Preface. To Economical Housewives
The wide publicity which the press in different sections of the country has given to my offer to show workingpeople earning a dollar and a half, or less, per day, how to get a good dinner for fifteen ...
-Chapter I. Marketing
The most perfect meats are taken from well-fed, full-grown animals, that have not been over-worked, under-fed, or hard-driven; the flesh is firm, tender, and well-flavored, and abounds in nutritious e...
-How To Choose Beef
The flesh of the best quality of beef is of a bright red color, intersected with closely laid veins of yellowish fat; the kidney fat, or suet, is abundant, and there is a thick layer upon the back. Th...
-How To Choose Mutton Or Lamb
Mutton Prime mutton is bright red, with plenty of hard, white fat. The flesh of the second quality is dark red and close grained, with very few threads of fat running through it; the fat is rather ...
-How To Choose Veal
-Prime veal is light flesh color, and has abundance of hard, white, semi-transparent fat. The flesh of the second quality is red in contrast to the pinkish-white color of the prime sort; and the fat i...
-How To Choose Pork
The best kind of pork is fresh and pinkish in color, and the fat is firm and white. The second quality has rather hard, red flesh, and yellowish fat. The poorest kind has dark, coarse grained meat, so...
-How To Choose Fish
Fish is richer in flesh-forming elements than game, poultry, lamb or veal, but it contains less fat and gelatin. It is easily digested, and makes strong muscular flesh, but does not greatly increase t...
-How To Choose Vegetables
In order to be healthy we must eat some fresh vegetables; they are cheap and nourishing, especially onions and cabbages. Peas, beans, and lentils, all of which are among the lowest priced of foods, ar...
-How To Choose Fruit
Fresh fruit is a very important food, especially for children, as it keeps the blood pure, and the bowels regular. Next to grains and seeds, it contains the greatest amount of nutriment to a given qua...
-Chapter II. How To Cook, Season, And Measure
Before beginning to give you receipts, I wish to tell you about the effect of cooking food in different ways. We all want it cooked so that we can eat it easily, and get the most strength from it, wit...
-How To Season Food
Many people have the idea that a finely flavored dish must cost a great deal; that is a mistake; if you have untainted meat, or sound vegetables, or even Indian meal, to begin with, you can make it de...
-Measuring
Be careful about measuring. Do not think you can guess just right every time; you cannot doit. One day the dinner will be a great deal better than another, and you will wonder why; it will be because ...
-Chapter III. Beverages
In my little book on Fifteen Cent Dinners, I decidedly advocate the substitution of milk or milk and water as a drink at meal times, for tea and coffee, on the score of economy; because milk is a fo...
-Tea
The physiological action of very strong tea is marked; moderately used it excites the action of the skin, lungs, and nervous system, and soothes any undue action of the heart; used to excess, it cause...
-Cocoa And Chocolate
Both these articles are made from the kernels of a tropical fruit, about the size of a cucumber, the fleshy part of which is sometimes used to produce a vinous liquor; they are produced from the seeds...
-Beer
Very poor families sometimes spend every day for beer enough to buy them a good, wholesome meal, because they think it mafces them strong. Beer, like all other liquors, is of no ra)ue whatever in maki...
-Chapter IV. Bread, Macaroni, And Rice
Homemade-bread is healthier, satisfies hunger better, and is cheaper than baker's bread. Make bread yourself if you possibly can. Use 'middlings if you can possibly get them; they contain the best e...
-Bread, Macaroni, And Rice. Continued
Rice Bread Simmer one pound of rice in three quarts of water until the rice is soft, and the water evaporated or absorbed; let it cool until it is only luke-warm; mix into it nearly four pounds of ...
-Macaroni
This is a paste made from the purest wheat flour and water; it is generally known as a rather luxurious dish among the wealthy; but it should become one of the chief foods of the people, for it contai...
-How To Cook Rice
Rice is largely composed of starch, and for that reason is less nutritious than flour, oatmeal, Indian meal, or macaroni; but it is a wholesome and economical food when used with a little meat broth, ...
-Chapter V. Soup
The value of soup as food cannot be overestimated. In times of scarcity and distress, when the question has arisen of how to feed the largest number of persons upon the least quantity of food, the ...
-Soup. Part 2
Scotch Broth Without Meat Steep four ounces of pearl barley, (cost three cents,) over night in cold water, and wash it well in fresh water; cut in dice half an inch square, six ounces of yellow tur...
-Soup. Part 3
Onion Soup Chop half a quart of onions, (cost three cents,) fry them brown, in a large saucepan, with two ounces of drippings, stirring until they are well browned, but not burned; then stir in hal...
-How To Make Fish Soup
Make this soup from any rich, glutinous fish, such as cod's head, halibut neck, flounders, skate, or any cheap fish which is in season, and which you can buy for five or six cents a pound. Chop one or...
-How To Make Vegetable Soup
The following is the receipt given by the celebrated Francatelli for a cheap vegetable soup: Put six quarts of water to boil in a large pot with quarter of a pound of suet, or two ounces of drippings,...
-How To Make Broth
Mutton Broth Put two pounds of a jointed neck of mutton, (cost twelve cents,) in two and a half quarts of cold water, and let it boil slowly; skim it carefully, season it with a level tablespoonful...
-Chapter VI. Peas, Beans, Lentils, And Maize
Before giving you receipts for cooking peas, beans, and lentils, I want to show you how important they are as foods. I have already spoken of the heat and flesh forming properties of food as the test ...
-How To Cook Beans
Baked Beans Put one pint of dried beans, (cost six cents,) and quarter of a pound of salt pork, (cost four cents,) into two quarts of cold water; bring them to a boil, and boil them slowly for abou...
-How To Cook Lentils
Lentils have been used for food in older countries for a long time, and it is quite necessary that we should become acquainted with their merits if we want to save; I give a lentil soup, and some exce...
-Maize, Or Indian Corn Meal
This native product is a strong and nutritious food, and very economical; in addition to the ordinary hasty-pudding, or mush, it can be cooked with a little pot-liquor, meat, or cheese, so as to be bo...
-Indian Cakes And Puddings
These are prepared in the same way as Johnny Cake, except that the batter is made about as thin as buckwheat cakes, and baked upon a greased griddle over the fire instead of in the oven. The most econ...
-Chapter VII. Cheap Fish And Meat Dinners
I have already spoken of the value of fish as strengthening food, and in support of what I say I need only to remind you now vigorous and healthy the inhabitants of the sea coast usually are, especial...
-Cheap Fish Dishes
Fish And Potato Pie Use any cheap fish which does not cost more than five or six cents a pound, such as cod, haddock, or blue-fish; cut two pounds of fish, (cost twelve cents,) in pieces about an i...
-Cheap Meats And Dishes
Those parts of meat which are called the cheap cuts, such as the head, brains, tongue, tripe, kidneys, haslet or pluck, feet, and tail, are eaten much more frequently in Europe than in this country, a...
-Cheap Meats And Dishes. Part 2
Stewed Sidneys And Potatoes Wash one quart of potatoes, (cost three cents,) pare off one ring from each, and put them to boil in well salted boiling water. Choose a very fresh beefs kidney, (cost f...
-Cheap Meats And Dishes. Part 3
Pork And Onions Three pounds of the neck, or spare ribs, of fresh pork, which you can buy at the packing houses for three cents a pound, can be made into a capital dinner, which will cost only abou...
-Chapter VIII. Sunday Dinners
Sunday is the workingman's festival. It is not only a day of rest from manual labor, a breathing space in his struggle for existence, an interval during which his devotional aspirations may have full ...
-Sunday Dinners. Continued
German Potatoes Carefully wash one quart of potatoes, removing any defective part, cut a slice from the top of the potatoes, take out a little of the inside, chop it fine, mix it with half a pound ...
-A La Mode Beef
This is one of the compound dishes which are mentioned in the beginning of this chapter, and will serve as a basis for at least two good dinners. Unless there is an unusual rise in the price of meat, ...
-How To Cook Fowl
Roast Fowl You can generally buy a fowl for about a shilling a pound; it need not be tender, but it ought to be fleshy in order to furnish the basis for two meals. Choose a fowl which will cost fif...
-How To Cook Chicken
Chicken Gravy Pour one pint of boiling water into the dripping pan in which the fowl was baked; while it is boiling up mix one heaping tablespoonful, or one ounce, of flour with half a cup of cold ...
-How To Cook Rabbits
Rabbit Curry Choose a tender rabbit or hare, which will cost at the market about twenty cents, and which if young will be plump, and have a short neck, thick knees, and fore paws whose joints break...
-How To Cook Pork
Pork Pie Cut in two inch pieces two pounds of pork trimmings, (cost ten cents,) roll them in flour, season them with two teaspoonfuls of salt, quarter of a level teaspoonful of pepper, and one teas...
-How To Cook Mutton Or Lamb
Boiled Mutton The shoulder of mutton can be bought at the market for about six cents a pound. Choose one weighing not over four pounds, (cost twenty-four cents,) wipe it with a clean, damp cloth, p...
-How To Cook Veal
Roast Veal The shoulder of veal can usually be bought at the market for eight cents a pound. Choose a fresh one weighing about seven pounds, and costing about sixty cents; from this we shall make t...
-Chapter IX. Cheap Puddings, Pies, And Cakes
Good puddings are nutritious and wholesome, and an excellent variety can be made at a comparatively small expense. Pies, as they are usually made, with greasy and indigestible pastry, are positively u...
-How To Make Fruit Dumplings
Make a nice suet crust, as directed for Suet Dumplings on page 53, roll it out about quarter of an inch thick, spread it with ten cents' worth of ripe fruit, quarter of a pound of sugar, (cost three c...
-How To Make Rice Croquettes
Boil half a pound of well washed rice, (cost five cents,) in one quart of cold water, with a level tablespoonful of salt, half a pint of milk, (cost two cents,) half the yellow rind of a lemon, or two...
-How To Make Tarts Or Cakes
Fruit Tarts Stew ten cents worth of fruit and four ounces of sugar together; make some pastry according to the directions in the receipt for Baked Apple Dumplings; line deep pie-plates with the pas...
-Chapter X. Dessert Dishes
The previous chapter was devoted to cheap and good sweet dishes of the kind usually called dessert in this country; the dessert proper, however, consists of fruit, creams, ices, small and delicate cak...
-Dessert Dishes. Continued
Melon Compote Make a syrup by boiling one pound of sugar, (cost ten cents,) with half a pint of water. Pare and slice a musk melon, (cost five cents,) and put it into the syrup with a little wine, ...
-How To Make Apple Desserts
Apple Black Caps Pare a quart of nice apples, core them without breaking, set them side by side in a baking dish that will just hold them, fill the centres with sugar, place two cloves in the top o...
-How To Make Currant Salad
Remove the stems from half a pound each of red and white currants, (cost ten cents,) and pile them in regular layers high in the centre of a shallow glass dish, sifting a little powdered sugar between...
-How To Make Cherry Cheese
Put into a stone jar a pound of sound, ripe cherries, with the stones removed, (cost about ten cents;) cover the jar closely, set it in a saucepan half full of boiling water, and simmer it gently unti...
-How To Make Grape Jelly
Dissolve one ounce of gelatine, (cost eight cents,) in half a pint of cold water. Break one pound and a half of grapes, (cost ten cents,) in an earthen bowl with a wooden spoon; strain the juice witho...
-How To Make Orange Salad
Peel six oranges, (cost twelve cents,) slice them, place them in rings in a glass dish, sprinkle them with three ounces of powdered sugar, (cost two cents,) pour over them a little wine and brandy, au...
-Compote Of Gooseberries
Choose a quart of large, sound, ripe, green gooseberries, (cost ten cents,) remove the stems and tops, throw them into boiling water for two minutes; drain them, let them lay three minutes in cold wat...
-How to Make Raspberry Or Strawberry Desserts
Iced Raspberries Beat the white of one egg, (cost one cent,) with two tablespoonfuls of cold water; pick over a quart of fine ripe raspberries, (cost ten cents,) dip them one by one into the eggt a...







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previous page: When Mother Lets Us Cook | by Constance Johnson
  
page up: Cook Books and Recipes
  
next page: Miss Leslie's New Receipts For Cooking | by Miss Eliza Leslie