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Miss Leslie's New Receipts For Cooking | by Miss Eliza Leslie



Comprising all the new and approved methods for preparing all kinds of: soups, meats, cakes, fish, poultry, confectionery, oysters, game, puddings, terrapins, sauces, corn-meal, turtle, pickles, pies, vegetables, sweetmeats, rice, etc. With lists op articles in season suited to go together for breakfasts, dinners, and suppers; and many new receipts, and much useful and valuable in formation on all subjects whatever connected with general housewifery.

TitleMiss Leslie's New Receipts For Cooking
AuthorMiss Eliza Leslie
PublisherT. B. Peterson
Year1852
Copyright1854, T. B. Peterson
AmazonNew Receipts for Cooking

"All the receipts in this book are new, and have been fully tried and tested by the author since the publication of her former book, and none of them whatever are contained in any other work but this. It is the most complete Cook Book published in the world, and also the latest and best, as in addition to Cookery, of all kinds and descriptions, its receipts for making cakes and confectionery are unequalled by any other work extant. In it there will be found One Thousand and Eleven new Receipts - all useful - some ornamental - and all invaluable to every lady, miss, or family in the world. In it will also be found popular and useful suggestions, - of immense value in every household, adding greatly to its convenience, its comfort and economy. No woman ought to be without this book. - Ladies' National Magazine.

-Preface
This volume is entirely different from my former work of Directions for Cookery, though sometimes strangely mistaken for it; an error which no person can commit after seeing both. These new receipts...
-Weights And Measures
Originally Tested and Arranged by Miss Leslie in the Year 1834. Wheat flour ............one pound of 16 ounces . is one quart Indian meal .......... one pound 2 ounces . . is one quart. Butter, whe...
-How To Make Soups
Spring Soup Unless your dinner hour is very late, the stock for this soup should be made the day before it is wanted, and set away in a stone pan, closely covered. To make the stock, take a knuckle...
-How To Make Soups. Continued
Winter Soup The day before you make the soup, get a fore-leg or shin of beef. Have the bone sawed through in several places, and the meat notched or scored down to the bone. This will cause the jui...
-How To Make Rabbit Soup
Begin this soup six hours before dinner. Cut up three large, but young and tender rabbits, or four small ones, (scoring the backs,) and dredge them with flour. Slice six mild onions, and season them w...
-How To Make Chicken Soup
Cut up two large fine fowls, as if carving them for the table, and wash the pieces in cold water. Take half a dozen thin slices of cold ham, and lay them in a soup-pot, mixed among the pieces of chick...
-How To Make Duck Soup
Half roast a pair of fine large tame ducks; keeping them half an hour at the fire, and saving the gravy, the fat of which must be carefully skimmed off. Then cut them up; season them with black pepper...
-How To Make Pigeon Soup
Pigeon Soup may be made as above. It will require one dozen tame pigeons, or two dozen wild ones. Wild pigeons may be made very fat by catching them alive in nets, at the season when they abound; c...
-How To Make Clam Soup
Fine Clam Soup Take half a hundred or more small sand clams, and put them into a pot of hard-boiling water. Boil them about a quarter of an hour, or till all the shells have opened wide. Then take ...
-French White Soup
Boil a knuckle of veal and four calves' feet in five quarts of water, with three onions sliced, a bunch of sweet herbs, four heads of white celery cut small, a table-spoonful of whole pepper, and a sm...
-Cocoa-Nut Soup
Take eight calves' feet (two sets) that have been scalded and scraped,but not skinned; and put them into a soup-kettle with six or seven blades of mace, and the yellow rind of a lemon pared thin. Pour...
-How To Make Meat Soup
To make the soup very good, the meat (of which there should be a large proportion, rather more than a pound to a quart of water) must remain in, till it drops entirely from the bones and is boiled to ...
-How To Cook Salmon
Fresh Salmon Stewed Having cleaned and washed the fish, cut it into round slices or fillets, rather more than an inch in thickness. Lay them in a large dish; sprinkling a very little salt evenly ov...
-How To Cook Turbot Or Sheep's-Head Fish
Boiled Turbot Or Sheep's-Head Fish Having cleaned and washed the fish, soak it an hour or two in salt and water to draw off the slime. Then let it lie half an hour or more in cold water. Afterwards...
-How To Cook Salmon-Trout
Baked Salmon-Trout Having cleaned the fish, and laid it two hours in weak salt and water, dry it in a-cloth, and then rub both the inside and outside with a seasoning of cayenne pepper, powdered ma...
-How To Cook Halibut Or Rock-Fish
Stewed Halibut Cut the fish into pieces about four inches square, of course omitting the bone. Season it very slightly with salt, and let it rest for half an hour. Then take it out of the salt, put...
-How To Cook Oysters
Excellent Stewed Oysters Take fifty fine large fresh oysters, and strain the liquor from them into a saucepan. Season it with equal portions of cayenne, black pepper, and salt, all mixed together i...
-How To Cook Oysters. Continued
Oyster Omelet Having strained the liquor from twenty-five oysters of the largest size, mince them small; omitting the hard part or gristle. If you cannot get large oysters, you should have forty or...
-How To Cook Cod-Fish
Stewed Cod-Fish Take a fine fresh cod, and cut into slices an inch thick, separated from the bones. Lay the pieces of fish in the bottom of a stew-pan: season them with a grated nutmeg; half a doze...
-How To Cook Clam
Clam Pie Take a sufficient number of clams to fill a large pie-dish when opened. Make a nice paste in the proportion of a pound of fresh butter to two quarts of flour. Paste for shell-fish, or meat...
-How To Cook Lobster
Lobster Patties Make some puff-paste, and spread it on very deep patty-pans. Bake it empty. Having boiled well two or three fine lobsters, extract all their meat, and mince it very small, mixing it...
-How To Dress A Turtle
The turtle should be taken out of water, and killed over night in winter, and early in the morning in summer. Hang it up by the hind fins, and before it has had time to draw in its neck, cut off its h...
-How To Cook Vegetables, Etc
An Excellent Way Of Boiling Cab-Bage Having trimmed the cabbage, and washed it well in cold water, (examing the leaves to see that no insects are lurking among them) cut it almost into quarters, bu...
-How To Cook Cauliflower
Cauliflower Omelet Take the white part of a boiled cauliflower after it is cold; chop it very small, and mix with it a sufficient quantity of well-beaten egg, to make a very thick batter. Then fry ...
-How To Cook Broccoli Or Artichokes
Broccoli And Eggs Take several heads of broccoli, and cut the stalks short, paring off from the stalks the tough outside skin. Trim off the small outside shoots or blossoms, and tie them together i...
-Mushroom Omelet
Take some fresh-gathered mushrooms; remove the stalks, and rub the flaps or heads very slightly with a little salt, mixed with cayenne. Then stew the mushrooms in a small sauce-pan, with barely suffic...
-How To Make Scolloped Tomatoes
Take fine large tomatoes, perfectly ripe. Scald them to loosen the skins, and then peel them. Cover the bottom of a deep dish thickly with grated bread-crumbs, adding a few bits of fresh butter. Then ...
-How To Cook Spinach
French Spinach Having picked them from the stalks, wash the leaves carefully in two or three cold waters, till they are quite free from grit. Put the spinach into a sauce-pan of hot water, in which...
-How To Cook Asparagus
Asparagus Loaves Having scraped the stalks of three bundles of fine, large asparagus, (laying it, as you proceed, in a pan of cold water,) tie it up again in bunches, put them into a pot with a gre...
-How To Cook Peas
Stewed Peas Take young, tender green peas, and put into a stew-pan, with sufficient fresh butter to keep them from burning, but no water. Season them with a little black pepper, and a very little s...
-How To Stew Carrots
Half-boil the carrots; then scrape them nicely, and cut them into thick slices. Put them into a stew-pan with as much milk as will barely cover them, a very little salt and pepper, and a sprig or two ...
-Stewed Beans (French Way.)
Take fresh young green beans, and string them. Do not split them; but merely cut them in half. It destroys the flavour of string-beans to divide them into small pieces. If very young, do not even cut ...
-How To Cook Potatoes
How To Stew Cold Potatoes Take cold potatoes, (either white or sweet ones,) and cut them into round or circular slices. Have ready some nice gravy of roast beef, veal, or fresh pork, that has been ...
-Sydney Smith's Salad-Dressing
Have ready two well-boiled potatoes, peeled and rubbed through a sieve; they will give peculiar smoothness to the mixture. Also, a very small portion of raw onion, not more than a quarter of a tea-spo...
-Lettuce Chicken Salad
Having skinned a pair of cold fowls, remove the fat, and carve them as if for eating, cut all the flesh entirely from the bones, and either mince it or divide it into small shreds. Mix with it a littl...
-Italian Chicken Salad
Make a dressing in the proportion of the yolks of three hard-boiled eggs, mashed or pounded fine; a salt-spoon of salt; and the same quantity of mustard, and of cayenne; and a salt-spoon of powdered w...
-How To Make Tarragon Sauce
Take a large handful of tarragon leaves, stripped from the stalks: put them into a small sauce-pan with half a pint of boiling water, and four blades of mace. Cover the sauce-pan, and let it stew slow...
-How To Make Fine Lemon Pickle
Take some fresh ripe lemons, and (having first rolled each one under your hand upon the table) cut them into quarters, and remove all the seeds. Put the pieces of lemon, with all the juice, into a sto...
-How To Make Peach Pickles
Stir two pounds of white sugar into two quarts of the best cider vinegar. Boil it ten minutes, skimming it well. Have ready some large fully-ripe peaches; rub them with a clean flannel to take off the...
-How To Make Cucumber Catchup
For a small quantity, take twelve fine full-grown cucumbers, and lay them an hour in cold water. Then pare them, and grate them down into a deep dish. Grate also six small onions, and mix them with th...
-How To Make Onion Custard
Peel and slice some mild onions, (ten or twelve, in proportion to their size,) and fry them in fresh butter; draining them well when you take them up. Then mince them as fine as possible. Beat four eg...
-How To Cook Lamb
Stewed Lamb Take a fine quarter of lamb, and for a large dish, cut the whole of it into steaks; for a small dish, cut up the loin only; or slice only the leg. Remove the skin, and all the fat. Plac...
-How To Cook Mutton
Fillet Of Mutton Cut a fillet or round from a leg of mutton; remove all the fat from the outside, and take out the bone. Beat it well on all sides with a meat-beetle or a rolling-pin, to make it mo...
-How To Cook Veal
Veal Loaf Take a cold fillet of veal, and (omitting the fat and skin) mince the meat as fine as possible. Mix with it a quarter of a pound of the fattest part of a cold ham, also chopped small. Add...
-How To Cook Veal. Continued
Excellent Minced Veal Take three or four pounds of the lean only of a fillet or loin of veal, and mince it very finely, adding a slice or two of cold ham, minced also. Add three or four small young...
-How To Make Minced Turkey Or Chicken
Take a cold turkey, or one or two cold fowls; remove all the skin,and cut the flesh from the bones. Then mince it fine, with two or three thin slices of cold smoked tongue, and from half a pint to a p...
-How To Cook Sweetbreads
Sweetbread Croquettes Having trimmed some sweetbreads nicely, and removed the gristle, parboil them, and then mince them very fine. Add grated bread, and season with a very little salt and pepper; ...
-How To Cook Sweetbreads. Continued
Stewed Sweetbreads With Oysters Take four fine sweetbreads; cut them open; extract the gristle, and lay them in warm water till all the blood is soaked out. Then transfer them to another vessel, an...
-How To Cook Beef
A Round Of Beef Stewed Brown Take a round of fresh beef; the larger it is the more tender it wm be: a small round is always, comparatively, hard and tough. Remove the fat; with a sharp knife make d...
-How To Cook Beef. Part 2
Beef Steaks With Mushrooms Take four pounds of the best sirloin steaks, cut thin. Season them with black pepper, and a very little salt. Put four table-spoonfuls of butter into a frying-pan, and se...
-How To Cook Beef. Part 3
French Beef Take a circular piece from the round, (having removed the bone,) and trim it nicely from the fat, skin, etc. Then lard it all over with long slips of fat pork or bacon. The place from w...
-Beef's Tongue Stewed
Take a fresh beef's tongue of the largest size. Remove the little bones, skin, etc, from about the root, and trim it nicely. Take a table-spoonful each of salt, pepper, and powdered cloves, and mix th...
-How To Bake Beef's Tongue
Take a large smoked tongue, put it into warm water and soak it all day. Change the water in the evening, and then let it remain in soak all night. Before you cook it, trim the root handsomely. Make a ...
-How To Cook Pork
Fillet Of Pork Cut a fillet or round, handsomely and evenly, from a fine leg of fresh pork. Remove the bone. Make a stuffing or force-meat of grated bread-crumbs; butter; a tea-spoonful of sweet-ma...
-How To Make A Fine Venison Pie
Cut steaks from a loin, or haunch of venison, which should be as freshly killed as you can get it. The strange prejudice in favour of hard, black-looking venison, that has been kept till the juices ar...
-How To Make A Very Plain Venison Pie
Cut from the bone some good pieces of fresh venison; season them a little with salt and pepper, and put them into a pot, with plenty of sliced potatoes, (either white or sweet,) and barely as much wat...
-How To Make A Venison Pudding
Take nice steaks of fresh venison; season them slightly with salt and pepper; put them into a pot, with a piece of fresh butter, and stew them in barely sufficient water to keep them from scorching. W...
-How To Make Venison Chesnut Pudding
Take some steaks of fresh-killed venison; season them slightly with pepper and salt. Have ready a sufficient quantity of large chesnuts, boiled and peeled. Make a crust of flour and suet, in the propo...
-How To Make A French Stew Of Rabbits
Having cut up the rabbits, lay the pieces in cold water, to soak out the blood. Then wash them through another water. Sea-son them with a little pepper, some powdered mace and nutmeg, and the yellow r...
-How To Cook Tounge Or Ham
Tongue Toast Take a cold smoked tongue that has been well boiled; and grate it with a coarse grater, or mince it fine. Mix it with cream, and beaten yolk of egg; and give it a simmer over the fire....
-How To Cook Chicken
Chickens Stewed Whole Having trussed a pair of fine fat young fowls or chickens, (with the liver under one wing, and the gizzard under the other,) fill the inside with large oysters, secured from f...
-How To Cook Chicken. Part 2
Chicken Gumbo Cut up a young fowl as if for a fricassee. Put into a stew-pan a large table-spoonful of fresh butter, mixed with a tea-spoonful of flour, and an onion finely minced. Brown them over ...
-How To Cook Chicken. Part 3
Rice Croquettes Boil half a pound of rice till it become quite soft and dry. Then mix with it two table-spoonfuls of rich (but not strong) grated cheese, a small tea-spoonful of powdered mace, and ...
-How To Cook Ducks
Brown Fricassee Half roast a pair of ducks. Then cut them apart, as for carving. If they are wild-ducks, parboil them with a large carrot (cut to pieces) inside of each, to draw out the fishy or se...
-How To Cook Partridges
Partridges In Pears Cut off the necks of the partridges close to the breast. Truss them very tight and round, and rub over them a little salt and cayenne pepper mixed. Cut off one of the legs, and ...
-How To Cook Game
A Nice Way Of Cooking Game Pheasants, partridges, quails, grouse, plovers, etc, are excellent stuffed with chesnuts: boiled, peeled, and mashed or pounded. Cover the birds with very thin slices of ...
-How To Cook Game. Continued
Rice Pie Pick clean a quart of rice, and wash it well through two or three waters. Tie it in a cloth, put it into a pot of boiling water, and boil it till perfectly soft. Then drain and press it ti...
-How To Cook A Raised French Pie
These pies have standing crust or walls, and may be filled with game or poultry, previously boned, seasoned, and stewed. They are generally made very large, and in winter will keep a week or two if cl...
-How To Cook A Boned Turkey
For this purpose you must have a fine, large, tender turkey; and after it is drawn, and washed, and wiped dry, lay it on a clean table, and take a very sharp knife, with a narrow blade and point. Begi...
-How To Make Columbian Pudding
Tie up closely in a bit of very thin white muslin, a vanilla bean cut into pieces; and a broken-up stick of cinnamon. Put this bag with its contents into half a pint of rich milk, and boil it a long t...
-How To Make A Marietta Pudding
Take a teacup-full of loaf-sugar broken up. On some of the largest lumps rub off the yellow rind of a large lemon. Then put all the sugar into a pint of rich cream; when the sugar is melted, set it ov...
-How To Make An Orleans Pudding
Half fill a deep dish with almond sponge-cake sliced thin, or with sliced lady-cake. Grate the yellow rind of a lemon, and mix it among the cake; adding also the juice of the lemon, and sufficient whi...
-How To Make Hanover Pudding
Cut up half a pound of fresh butter in half a pint of milk. Set them over the fire till the butter is soft enough to mix thoroughly with the milk. Then take it off, and let it stand till lukewarm. Hav...
-How To Make Turkish Rice Pudding
Pick and wash half a pound of rice. Prepare also half a pound of Zante currants, which must be carefully picked clean, washed through two waters, drained well, and then spread out to dry on a flat dis...
-How To Make Cream Cocoa-Nut Pudding
Take two cocoa-nuts of large size. Break them up, and pare off the brown skin from the pieces. Then grate them very fine. Stir together a quarter of a pound of the best fresh butter, and a quarter of ...
-How To Make Pine-Apple Pudding
Take half a pound of grated pine-apple; half a pound of powdered white sugar, and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter. Put the sugar into a deep pan, cut up the butter among it, and stir them togethe...
-How To Make An Almond Rice Pudding
Blanch, in boiling water, three ounces of shelled bitter almonds, afterwards throwing them into cold water. Pound them, one at a time, in a mortar, till they become a , smooth paste; adding frequently...
-How To Make Boiled Almond Pudding
Blanch, in boiling water, a quarter of a pound of shelled sweet almonds, and two ounces of shelled bitter almonds. Throw them into a pan of cold water, as you blanch them. Afterwards pound them, one a...
-How To Make Biscuit Puddings
Grate some stale milk-biscuits, till you have six heaping table-spoonfuls of fine crumbs. Then sift them through a coarse sieve. Beat six eggs very light, and stir them into a pint of cream, or rich, ...
-How To Make An Excellent Corn-Meal Pudding
Boil a quart of rich milk, and pour it scalding hot into a large pan. Stir in, gradually, a quart of sifted Indian meal, and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; adding the grated yellow rind of a le...
-How To Make Peach Indian Pudding
Wash a pint, or more, of dried peaches; then drain them well; spread them on a large dish, and set them in the sun, or near the fire, till all the water that remains about them is entirely exhaled. Bo...
-How To Make A Fine Indian Pudding
Take a pound of raisins, and cut them in half, having first removed the seeds. Then spread them on a large dish, and dredge them thickly with fine wheat flour, turning them about, that both sides may ...
-How To Make Raspberry Pudding
Fill a deep dish with a quart of ripe raspberries, well mixed with four or five large table-spoonfuls of powdered sugar. As you put in the raspberries mash them slightly with the back of a spoon. Beat...
-How To Make Ripe Currant Pudding
Take two quarts of fine ripe currants, strip them from the stalks, and mix with them a quarter of a pound of sugar. Make a paste of a pound and a half of sifted flour, and three-quarters of a pound of...
-How To Make Gooseberry Pudding
Take a quart or more of full-grown green gooseberries. Pick off the tops and tails, and as you do so, lay the gooseberries in a pan. Then pour on sufficient boiling water to scald them thoroughly, cov...
-How To Make A Raisin Pudding
Stone a pound of large fine fresh raisins, and cut them in half. If using the sultana, or seedless raisins, you may leave them whole. Spread the raisins on a large flat dish; and mix with them the yel...
-How To Make Mince Pudding
Take a pound and a half of mince-meat, and sift three-quarters of a pound of flour. Beat six eggs very light, and stir into them, alternately, the mince-meat and the flour, a little at a time of each....
-How To Make A Temperance Plum Pudding
Take a pound of the best raisins, and cut them in half, after removing the seeds. Or use sultana raisins that have no seeds. Pick, and wash clean, a pound of currants, and dry them before the fire, sp...
-How To Make Tapioca Pudding
Put four large table-spoon-fuls of tapioca into a quart of milk, and let it stand all night. In the morning put half a pint of milk into a small sauce-pan, and boil in it a large stick of cinnamon bro...
-How To Make Excellent Ground Rice Pudding
Take half a pint from a quart of rich milk, and boil in it a large handful of bitter almonds or peach kernels, blanched and broken up; also half a dozen blades of mace, keeping the sauce-pan closely c...
-How To Make Excellent Ground Rice Pudding. Part 2
A Charlotte Pudding Have ready a sufficiency of dried peaches that have been stewed very soft, and flavoured, while stewing, with the yellow rind of one or two oranges, pared very thin and cut into...
-How To Make Excellent Ground Rice Pudding. Part 3
Maccaroni Pudding Boil a quarter of a pound of maccaroni in a pint of rich unskimmed milk, with a handful of blanched bitter almonds or peach-kernels, and two sticks of cinnamon broken into pieces....
-How To Make Custard
Green Custard Pound in a marble or white-ware mortar a sufficient quantity of fresh spinach, till you have extracted as much green juice as will half fill a half-pint tumbler, or two common-sized w...
-How To Make Fritters
Altona Fritters Pare some fine pippin or bell-flower apples that are quite ripe, and of the largest size. Then extract the cores with a tin apple-corer, so as to leave the hole in the centre smooth...
-How To Make Fritters. Continued
Sweetmeat Fritters Having boiled a large beet till it is tender all through, and scraped off the outside, cut the beet into pieces, and pound them in a marble mortar till you have extracted the jui...
-How To Make Very Fine Mince-Meat
Boil two beef's tongues, (perfectly fresh,) and, when cold, skin and mince them; including the fat about the roots. Mince, also, one pound of beef-suet, and mix it with the chopped tongues. Add four n...
-How To Make Temperance Mince-Meat
Take three pounds of the lean of a round of fresh beef, that has been boiled the day before. It must be thoroughly boiled, and very tender. Mince it, as finely as possible, with a choppirig-knife; and...
-How To Make Transparent Paste
Take twelve ounces (or a pint and a half) of the best fresh butter. Wash and squeeze it through several cold waters, and press out whatever milk may remain about it. Then set it over the fire to softe...
-How To Make Orange Or Lemon Tarts
Take six or seven fine large-sweet oranges; roll them under your hand on a table to increase the juice, and then squeeze them through a strainer over half a pound or more of powdered loaf-sugar. Mix t...
-How To Make A Very Fine Charlotte Russe
Boil a vanilla bean and a few blades of mace in half a pint of rich milk till it is highly flavoured. Then take out the bean; wipe it; and put it away for another time, and remove the mace also. Mix t...
-How To Make An Italian Or French Charlotte
An Italian Charlotte Take a pint of rich cream; set it on ice, and beat and stir it till it becomes a solid froth. Then boil a vanilla bean in half a pint of rich milk till it is highly flavoured. ...
-How To Make A Sweet Omelet
Break small in an earthen pan six maccaroons made with bitter almonds, and mix with them a dozen orange-blossoms pounded to a paste. If the orange-flowers are not quite blown, the fragrance and flavou...
-How To Make Sunderlands Or Jelly Puffs
Take a broad pan, and put into it a pint of rich milk, and half a pound of the best fresh butter. Cut up the butter in the milk, and, if in cold weather, set it in a warm place, on the stove, or on th...
-How To Make Rhubarb Cups
Take twenty stalks of green rhubarb; cut them, and boil them in a quart of water. When it comes to a hard boil, take it from the fire; strain off the water; drain the rhubarb as dry as possible, and t...
-How To Make Blanc-Mange
Spanish Blanc-Mange Weigh half a pound of broken-up loaf-sugar of the best quality. On one of the pieces rub off the yellow rind of a large lemon Then powder all the sugar, and mix with it a pint o...
-How To Make Blanc-Mange. Continued
Maccaroon Blanc-Mange Chip small an ounce of the best Russia isinglass; put it into a small sauce-pan; pour on it a jill of cold water; and boil it till the isinglass is entirely melted, stirring a...
-How To Make Flummery
Orange Flummery Begin the day before, by boiling four large calves' feet or eight small ones in three quarts of water. The best feet for this purpose are those that are scalded and scraped, but not...
-Meringued Apples
Pare and core (with a tin apple-corer) some fine large pippin apples, but do not quarter or slice them. Wash them separately in cold water, and then with the water still remaining about the surface of...
-How To Make Cream
Chocolate Cream Scrape down a quarter of a pound of the best chocolate, or of Baker's prepared cocoa. Put it into a marble mortar. Pour on by degrees as much boiling water as will dissolve it, and ...
-How To Make Ices
Iced Jelly Make calves' feet jelly in the usual way. Then put it into a freezer, and freeze it as you would ice-cream. Serve it up in a glass bowl or in jeliy-glasses. You cannot mould it this way;...
-How To Make Ice-Cream
Peach Ice-Cream Take fine soft free-stone peaches, perfectly ripe. Pare them, and remove the stones. Crack about half the stones, and extract the kernels, which must be blanched by putting them int...
-Flavoured Curds And Whey
To turn two quarts of milk, take a piece of dried rennet about the size of the palm of your hand; wash it well through several cold waters to get the salt entirely off, and then wipe it dry. Put it in...
-How To Make Rennets
Milk turned into a curd with wine, is by no means so good as that which is done with rennet-water alone. The curd and whey do not separate so completely: the curd is less firm, and the whey less clear...
-Hints On Calves' Foot Jelly
In making calves' foot jelly, if you intend it for moulds, put in two or three pieces of isinglass when you are boiling the ingredients. If you wish it a deep rich colour, put into the bottom of the s...
-How To Make American Citron
Pare a sufficient number of citron-melons, and cut each melon into four thick quarters. Weigh them, and put them over-night into a tureen, or a large white-ware pan or basin. The custom of steeping sw...
-How To Make Preserved Citron-Melons
Take some fine citron-melons; pare, core, and cut them into slices. Then weigh them; and, to every six pounds of melon, allow six pounds of the best double-refined loaf-sugar; and the juice and yellow...
-An Easy Way Of Preserving Pine-Apples
Take pine-apples, as ripe as you can possibly get them; pare them, and cut them into thin, circular slices. Weigh them, and to each pound of pine-apple allow a pound of the best double-refined loaf-su...
-Fine Pine-Apple Marmalade
Take the largest, ripest, and most perfect pine-apples. Pare them, and cut out whatever blemishes you may find. Weigh each pine-apple, balancing the other scale with an equal weight of the best double...
-The Best Way Of Preserving Pineapples
Take six large, fine, ripe pine-apples. Make them very clean, but do not pare off the rind, or cut off the leaves. Put them, whole, into a very large and very clean pot or kettle. Fill it up with cold...
-Quinces
Quinces may be preserved in a similar manner; first boiling them whole, with the skin on; then peeling them, and extracting the cores; then slicing the quinces into round, thin pieces, and letting the...
-Fine Orange Marmalade
Quarter some large, ripe oranges, and remove the rind, the seeds, and the strings, or filaments; taking care, as you do so, to save all the juice. Put the pulp and juice into a porcelain sauce-pan, an...
-Apple Marmalade
Break up four pounds of fine loaf-sugar. Put it into a preserving-kettle, and pour on a quart of clear, cold water. When the sugar has melted, stir it; set the kettle over the fire, and let it boil fo...
-How To Make A Fine Orange Jelly
Take four large calves' feet, that have been singed, but not skinned, Boil them in a gallon of clear, soft water, till the liquid is reduced to one quart, and all the meat has dropped from the bones. ...
-How To Make Excellent Currant-Jelly
The currants should be quite ripe, but not over-ripe. Having picked them from the stems, put the fruit into a large stone jar, or pitcher, and tie closely over the top a very thick paper, (for instanc...
-How To Make Four Fruit Jelly
Take equal quantities of ripe strawberries, raspberries, currants, and red cherries. All should be full) ripe, and the cherries must be stoned, taking care to save the juice that comes from them in s...
-How To Make Jam
Barberry Jam Take barberries that are perfectly ripe. Pick them from the stems; and to each quart of berries, allow three-quarters of a pound of clean rich brown sugar. Mash the barberries, and put...
-An Excellent Way Of Preserving Strawberries
Select the largest and finest strawberries. Having hulled them, or removed the green tops, weigh the strawberries; and allow to each pound a pound of the best double-refined loaf-sugar, finely powdere...
-Very Fine Preserved Peaches
Take fine ripe free-stone peaches; pare them; cut them in half and remove the stones. Have ready a sufficiency of the best double-refined loaf-sugar, finely powdered. Weigh the sugar and the peaches t...
-Common Peach Jam
Take good ripe freestone peaches, pare them, and cut them into small pieces seeing that none are blemished in the least. Cover the bottom of a stone jar with a thick layer of powdered sugar, (very goo...
-How To Preserve Green Gages
Take gages that are perfectly ripe. Weigh them; and to each pound of fruit allow a pound of the best double-refined loaf-sugar, broken- up. Put a layer of grape-leaves in the bottom and round the side...
-How To Make Brandy Peaches
Fine Brandy Peaches Take large ripe free-stone peaches: the white ones are best for this purpose. Having rubbed off the wool with a clean flannel, put the peaches whole into boiling water, just to ...
-How To Make Brandy Green Gapes
Take the largest and finest green gages, quite ripe. Prick every one with a needle in several places. Spread fresh grape-leaves over the bottom, and round the sides of a preserving kettle. Put in a la...
-American Prunes
Take the largest and finest purple plums, (oval or long-shaped if you can get them.) They must be quite ripe. Spread them separately on flat dishes, and set them in a large oven, directly after the br...
-How To Stew Dried Peaches
Dried peaches can be used for no purpose without first being thoroughly stewed. They should be soaked for some hours before cooking. Take a sufficient quantity, and put them over night into a pan, (ha...
-Dried Apples
Dried Apples should be soaked and stewed as above. They will be much improved by stewing with them some thin slips of the yellow rind of lemon or orange; or by the addition of a few cloves. Sugar s...
-How To Make Breakfast And Tea Cakes
Indiana Batter Cakes Sift into a pan three large pints of yellow corn-meal; and add a large table-spoonful of fresh lard; or of nice drippings of roast beef, well cleared from fat. Add a small tea-...
-How To Make Breakfast And Tea Cakes. Continued
Harlem Cakes Sift into a pan three pints of flour. Warm, in a sauce-pan, a pint of milk, and cut up in it half a pound of fresh butter. When the butter is soft enough to mix with the milk, stir the...
-How To Make Rice Bread
To a pint of well-boiled rice, add half a pint of wheat-flour, mixing them well together. Take six eggs, and beat the whites and yolks separately. Having beaten the whites to a stiff froth, mix them, ...
-How To Make Long Rolls
Sift three quarts of flour into a large pan, and mix with it a tea-spoonful of salt. Warm half a pint of water, but do not let it become hot. Mix with it six table-spoonfuls of strong, fresh yeast. Ma...
-How To Beat Eggs
In making cakes it is of the utmost importance that the eggs should be properly and sufficiently beaten; otherwise the cakes will most certainly be deficient in the peculiar lightness characterizing t...
-How To Make Boston Cake
Put a pound of powdered white sugar into a deep pan, and cut up in it a pound of fresh butter. Stir the butter and sugar together till perfectly light. Then add a powdered nutmeg, a table-spoonful of ...
-How To Make Albany Cake
Sift three pounds of flour into a pan. Stir together a pound of fresh butter, and a pound of brown sugar. Mix together a pint of West India molasses, and half a pint of rich milk. Have ready a pound a...
-How To Make Austrian Cake
Take a thick straight-sided pound cake about the circumference of a large dinner plate, and cut it horizontally into slices, the. whole breadth, of the cake, and rather more than half an inch thick. S...
-How To Make Madison Cake
Pick clean two pounds of sultana raisins, (those that have no seeds,) and cut them in half. If you cannot procure the sultana, use the bloom or muscatel raisins, removing all the seeds. When the raisi...
-How To Make Strawberry Cakes
Sift a small quart of flour into a pan, and cut up among it half a pound of the best fresh butter; or mix in a pint of butter if it is soft enough to measure in that manner. Rub with your hands the bu...
-How To Make Cakes
Pick clean and wash a quart of dried peaches, and let them stew all night in as much clear water as will cover them. In the morning, drain off most of the water, leaving only as much of it about the p...
-How To Make Chocolate Cake
Scrape down three ounces of the best and purest chocolate, or prepared cocoa. Cut up, into a deep pan, three-quarters of a pound of fresh butter; add to it a pound of powdered loaf-sugar; and stir the...
-How To Make Lemon Or Orange Puffs
Lemon Puffs Take a pound of the best loaf-sugar, and powder it. Grate upon lumps of the same sugar the yellow rind of four large ripe lemons; having first rolled each lemon under your hand, upon a ...
-How To Make Meringues
Rose Meringues Beat to a stiff froth the whites of six eggs, and then beat in by degrees, a spoonful at a time, a pound or more of finely-powdered loaf-sugar, till it is of the consistence of very ...
-How To Make Cream Tarts
Put into a tea-cup a large table-spoonful of arrow-root flour. Pour on it a very little cold milk, and mix it very smooth with a spoon; seeing that it is entirely free from lumps. Boil, in a sauce-pan...
-How To Make Ice-Cream Cakes
Stir together, till very light, a quarter of a pound of powdered sugar and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter. Beat six eggs very light, and stir into them half a pint of rich milk. Add, gradually, ...
-How To Make Lemon Or Orange Kisses
Take three large, ripe lemons, or oranges, and rub off the yellow rind, upon some pieces belonging to a pound of fine loaf-sugar. Then powder all the pound of sugar, and squeeze among the sugar (throu...
-How To Make Maccaroons
Chocolate Maccaroons Blanch half a pound of shelled sweet almonds, by scalding them with boiling water, till the skin peels off easily. Then throw them into a bowl of cold water, and let them stand...
-How To Make West India Cocoa-Nut Cake
Cut up and peel some pieces of a very ripe cocoa-nut. Lay the pieces for awhile in cold water. Then take them out; wipe them very dry; and grate, very finely, as much as, when grated, will weigh half ...
-How To Make Rice-Flour Pound-Cake
Weigh a pound of broken up loaf-sugar of the best quality. Upon some of the largest lumps rub off the yellow rind of three large ripe lemons that have been previously rolled under your hand, on a tabl...
-How To Make Rice Sponge-Cake
Put twelve eggs into a scale, and balance them in the other scale with their weight in broken loaf-sugar. Take out four of the eggs, remove the sugar, and balance the remaining eight eggs with an equa...
-How To Make Sweet Potatoe Cake
Half-boil some fine sweet potatoes; peel them; and when cold, grate as much as will weigh half a pound. If boiled long enough to become soft, they will render the cake heavy. Stir together in a deep p...
-How To Make Puffs
Chocolate Puffs Beat very stiff the whites of two eggs, and then beat in, gradually, half a pound of powdered loaf-sugar. Scrape down very fine, an ounce and a half of the best chocolate, (prepared...
-How To Make Palmer Cakes
Sift a pound of flour into a pan, and rub into it half a pound of butter, and a quarter of a pound of powdered loaf-sugar. Add a tea-spoonful of mixed spice, powdered cinnamon, nutmeg, and mace. Wet t...
-How To Make Wonders
Cut up half a pound of fresh butter into a pound of sifted flour, and rub them well together with your hands. Mix in three-quarters of a pound of white sugar, and a large tea-spoonful of cinnamon. Add...
-How To Make Soft Crullers
Sift three quarters of a pound of flour, and powder half a pound of loaf-sugar. Heat a pint of water in a round-bottomed sauce-pan, and when quite warm, mix the flour with it gradually. Set half a pou...
-Notions
Put into a sauce-pan a pint of milk, and two table-spoonfuls of fresh butter. Set it over the fire, and when the butter begins to melt, stir it well through the milk. As soon as it comes to a boil, be...
-How To Make Cross-Buns
Pick clean a pound and a half of Zante currants; wash, drain, and dry them; spreading them on a large flat dish, placed in a slanting position near the fire or in the sun. When they are perfectly dry,...
-How To Ice A Large Cake
It requires practice to ice cakes smoothly. It is a good rule to allow a large quarter of a pound of powdered loaf-sugar to the white of every egg. The whites of four eggs and a pound of sugar will ic...
-French Icing For Cakes
Dissolve some fine white gum arabic (finely powdered) in rose-water. The proportion should be, as much of the gum-arabic powder as will lie on a ten-cent piece to a tea-spoonful of Jose-water. Beat so...
-How To Make Apple Cake
Make a nice light paste with the proportion of three quarters of a pound of fresh butter to a pound and a quarter of sifted flour. Roll it out into a large round sheet. Have ready a sufficiency of fin...
-How To Make Cinnamon Cakes
Make a paste as above, and roll it out thin into a square sheet. Have ready a mixture of brown sugar; fresh butter; and a large portion of ground cinnamon; all stirred together till very light. Spread...
-How To Make Gingerbread
Ginger Pound Cake Cut up in a pan three quarters of a pound of butter; mix with it a pint of West India molasses, and a tea-cup of brown sugar. If in winter, set it over the fire till the butter ha...
-How To Make Gingerbread. Continued
Sea-Yoyage Gingerbread Sift two pounds of flour into a pan, and cut up in it a pound and a quarter of fresh butter; rub the butter well into the flour, and then mix in a pint of West India molasses...
-How To Make Pumpkin Mush
Pour into a clean pot, two quarts or more of good milk, and set it over the fire. Have ready some pumpkin stewed very soft and dry; mashed smooth, and pressed in a cullender till all the liquid has dr...
-How To Make Molasses Cake
Cut up a quarter of a pound of fresh butter into a pint of West India molasses. Warm it just sufficiently to soften the butter, and make it mix easily. Stir it well into the molasses, and add a table-...
-How To Freshen Cakes
Cakes when stale may be much improved, if about an hour before they are wanted for tea, you enclose them in a circular wooden box with a tight-fitting lid, and place it on the marble hearth before a g...
-How To Make Domestic Liquors, Etc
Gooseberry Champagne Take large, fine gooseberries, that are full-grown, but not yet beginning to turn red; and pick off their tops and tails. Then weigh the fruit, and allow a gallon of clear, sof...
-How To Make Domestic Liquors, Etc. Part 2
Domestic Frontiniac Put into a targe kettle, twelve pounds of broken-up loaf-sugar; and pour on it six gallons of clear, soft water, and let the sugar dissolve. Take seven pounds of the best raisin...
-How To Make Domestic Liquors, Etc. Part 3
Rosolis Put four pounds of the best loaf-sugar into a large porcelain kettle; and pour on it three quarts of water. When it has melted, set it over the fire, and boil and skim it, till the scum cea...
-How To Make Domestic Liquors, Etc. Part 4
Mint Julep Put into the bottom of a tumbler, about a dozen sprigs of young and tender mint. Upon them place a large tea-spoonful of fine white sugar; and then pour on peach-brandy, so as to reach n...
-How To Make Sweet Syrups
Orange Syrup Take large fine ripe oranges, with smooth thin rinds, and roll each orange under your hand upon the table to increase the juice. Set a very clean sieve upon a large bowl, and cut the o...
-How To Make Fine Raspberry Cordial
Fill a large stone jar with ripe raspberries. Cover the jar closely, and let it stand in a corner of the hearth near the fire, or on the top of a stove, till the fruit is heated so as to break. Then p...
-How To Make Fine Raspberry Vinegar
Put a sufficient quantity of ripe raspberries into a large wooden or stone vessel, and pour on as much of the best genuine white wine vinegar as will cover them well. Cover the vessel, and let it stan...
-How To Make Vinegar
Take five gallons of soft, clear water, two quarts of whisky, two quarts of the best West India molasses, and half a pint of the best fresh yeast. Lay a sheet of white foolscap paper at the bottom of ...
-How To Make Apple Or Toast Water
Apple-Water Take three large, juicy pippin apples; pare, core, and cut them into very thin slices. Put them into a pitcher, (the yellow rind of a lemon, pared thin, will be an improvement,) and pou...
-An Excellent Way Of Making Coffee
For this purpose you should have a percolator, or coffee-pot with strainers inside. The coffee will be much stronger and better, if roasted and ground just before it is put in the pot. There are no co...
-Ways Of Making Cocoa
The cocoa which is put up solid in close packages, and usually sold at a shilling a paper, is far superior to the chocolate that is manufactured into squares or cakes, and which is too frequently adul...
-How To Keep Orange-Juice
The oranges must be large and ripe. To increase the quantity of juice, roll each orange under your hand on a table, or with your foot upon a clean hearth-stone. Then cut them in half, and score each h...
-How To Preserve Lemon-Juice For A Voyage
Select only the best and freshest lemons. One that is in the least tainted will spoil the whole. Roll every lemon under your hand upon a table to increase the juice. Then squeeze them well through a s...
-How To Keep Cider Sweet
When barreling the cider, put into each barrel or keg a jill (eight large table-spoonfuls) of white mustard-seed. This will retard its becoming hard or sour. How To Make Bottled Cider Very Bris...
-How To Preserve Fruits
How To Keep Oranges And Lemons Take a sufficiency of fine sand, and make it very dry by exposing it to the heat of the sun or the fire, stirring- it fre-quentiy. Afterwards let it become quite cold...
-An Easy Way Of Making Butter In Winter
The following will be found an excellent method of making butter in cold weather for family use. We recommend its trial. Take, in the morning, the unskimmed milk of the preceding evening, (after it ha...
-Food And Other Colouring
Cochineal Colouring Take an ounce of cochineal, and pound it to a fine powder. Put it into an earthen or porcelain vessel, that is quite clean, and entirely free from grease. Add a small salt-spoon...
-How To Make Macassar Oil
This popular and pleasant unguent for the hair can (as we know) be prepared at home, so as to equal, in efficacy and appearance, any that is for sale in the shops; and at less than one-third the expen...
-How To Make Antique Oil
This is a fine oil for the hair. Mix together, in a clean glass vessel, half a pint of oil of sweet almonds, and half a pint of the best olive oil. Then scent it with any sort of perfume. To give i...
-How To Make Perfumery, Remedies, Etc
Oil Of Cassia Put into a wide-mouthed glass vessel, an ounce of ground cassia. Heat three ounces of the best oil of cloves; and, while warm, pour it on the cassia. Cover it closely, and let it stan...
-How To Perfume Soap
Take half a pound or more of the best white soap. Shave it down with a knife. Put the shavings into a clean white-ware jar; cover the top closely, and secure the cover by tying down a cloth over it. S...
-Good Tooth-Powder
Procure, at a druggist's, half an ounce of powdered orris-root, half an ounce of prepared chalk finely pulverized, and two or three small lumps of dutch pink. Let them all be mixed in a mortar, and po...
-How To Make Glue
Parchment Glue Take half a pound of clean parchment cuttings, and boil it in three quarts of soft water till reduced to one pint. Then strain it from the dregs, and boil it again, till of the consi...
-Milk Of Roses
Mix together a pint of rose-water, and an ounce of oil of sweet almonds. Then add ten drops of oil of tartar. Bottle it, and shake it well. It is good for the hands. Excellent Pomatum Mel...
-An Excellent Way Of Improving The Hair
Once in three days take some rich unskimmed milk that has been made sour by standing in the sun. Stir it up, so as to mix all through it the cream that has collected on the surface. Wash the hair with...
-Salt Of Lemon Or Stain Powder
This powder, which is erroneously called salt of lemon, is in reality composed simply of equal portions of finely pulverized salt of sorrel and cream of tartar, (for instance an ounce of each,) mixed ...
-How To Make Grease Balls
Shave down half a pound of white -soap, and mix it with three ounces of fuller's earth, powdered. Then mix together three ounces of ox-gall, and two ounces of spirits of turpentine. With this, moisten...
-How To Extract Grease With Camphine Oil
Grease of the very worst sort (for instance whale oil) may be extracted successfully even from silks, ribbons, and other delicate articles, by means of camphine oil, which can always be procured at th...
-How To Make Colouring For Walls
Fine Yellow Colouring For Walls Procure from a paint-shop one pound of chrome yellow, and three pounds of whiting. Mix and grind them, thoroughly together; and then add a quart of boiling water, an...
-How To Clean Whitewash Brushes
Wash off; with cold water, the lime from the bristles of the brush; and scrub well with a hard scrubbing-brush the part where the bristles are fixed into the wood. This should be done at once, as soon...
-An Easy Way To Make Ink
Take two ounces of the best and most perfect nut-galls, and bruise them to pieces with a hammer. Put them into a large mug, with half an ounce of copperas, and a quarter of an ounce of powdered gum-ar...
-How To Soften Sponges
A sponge, when first purchased, is frequently hard, stiff, and gritty. To soften it, and dislodge the particles of sea-sand from its crevices, (having first soaked and squeezed it through several cold...
-How To Remove The Odour From A Vial
The odour of its last contents may be removed from a vial by filling it with cold water, and letting it stand in any airy place uncorked for three days; changing the water every day. ...
-How To Loosen A Glass Stopper
The manner which apothecaries loosen glass stoppers when there is difficulty in getting them out, is to press the thumb of the right hand very hard against the lower part of the stopper, and then give...
-How To Get A Broken Cork Out Of A Bottle
If in drawing a cork it breaks, and the lower part falls down into the liquid, tie a long loop in a bit of twine, or small cord, and put it in; holding the bottle so as to bring the piece of cork near...
-How To Purify The Atmosphere Of A Room
Mix, in a cup, some brown sugar, with sufficient water to make it a thick liquid. Put a hot coal on a shovel; pour on the coal a tea-spoonful, or more, of the sugar, and carry it carefully about the r...
-How To Clean Jars
There is frequently much trouble in cleaning the inside of jars that have contained sweet-meats, pickles, mince-meat, etc, so as entirely to remove all the odour of their former contents, before they ...
-How To Clean Looking-Glasses
Take a newspaper, or a part of one, according to the size of the glass. Fold it small, and dip it into a basin of clean, cold water. When thoroughly wetted, squeeze it out in your hand, as you would a...
-How To Remove Dark Stains From Silver
There are many substances that communicate a dark, inky stain to silver spoons, forks, etc.; a stain sometimes so inveterate as to resist all common applications. A certain remedy is, to pour a little...
-How To Clean Rings, Brooches, And Other Jewelry
Put a little hartshorn into a saucer; dip into it a clean, soft rag, from an old cambric handkerchief. With the rag, go carefully over the jewelry, on both sides. Then dry and polish, with another bit...
-How To Keep Silver Always Bright
Silver, in constant use, should be washed every day in a pan of suds made of good white soap and warm water; drying it with old soft linen cloths. Twice a week, (after this washing,) give it a thoroug...
-How To Keep Britannia-Metal Bright
Dip a clean woollen cloth into the best and cleanest lamp oil, and rub it, hard, all over the outside of your Britannia-ware. Then wash it well in strong soap-suds, and afterwards polish with finely-p...
-How To Clean Silver Expeditiously
Put some powdered magnesia into a saucer. Have ready a few bits of new canton flannel. It is well, in cutting out canton flannel, to save the small shavings, or clippings, for this purpose. Dip a bit ...
-Paste For Cleaning Knives
Make a mixture, one part emery, and three parts crocus martis, in very fine powder. Mix them to a thick paste, with a little lard or sweet oil. Have your knife-board covered with a thick buff-leather....
-A Good Way Of Cleaning Silver
Mix in a cup or saucer a paste of powdered magnesia, and the best and clearest lamp oil, (whale oil,) and cover with this paste the silver that is to be cleaned. Let it rest a quarter of an hour or mo...
-How To Take White Marks From Mahogany
If a white mark has been left on a mahogany table by carelessly setting down on it a vessel of hot water, rub the place hard with a rag dipped in lamp oil; and afterwards pour on a little cologne wate...
-How To Clean A Hearth Or Floor
How To Take Spermaceti Out Of A Hearth Or Floor First scrape off the drops of spermaceti with a knife. Then take a live coal in the tongs and hold it carefully and closely over the place. Afterward...
-How To Make Shoes Or Boots Water-Proof
Melt together, in a pipkin, equal quantities of bees-wax and mutton suet. While liquid, rub it over the leather, including the soles. ...
-How To Take Off Wall Paper
To clear a wall from paper previous to painting or white-washing it, wet the old paper thoroughly with a long-handled brush dipped in a bucket of water, (warm water is best.) Let it rest till the wate...
-Dusting Furniture
If a hand-brush is employed for dusting furniture it should always be followed by a cloth; and the cloth should be so used as to wipe up the dust; and not merely flirted about it, so as to drive the p...
-How To Take Fruit Stains From White Doilies Or Napkins
The use of coloured doilies for wiping the fingers after eating fruit being nearly exploded, and small white napkins being now substituted for that purpose, let them, as soon as taken from table, be t...
-How To Clear Closets From Cockroaches
Remove every article from the closet, scrub the shelves with lye, and then whitewash the closet walls. Next take a sufficiency of black wadding, and soak it in spirits of turpentine or camphor, or a m...
-How To Destroy Insects Or Vermin
How To Destroy Crickets Mix some powdered arsenic with roasted apple, and put it into the cracks and holes whence the crickets issue. It will effectually destroy them. And cockroaches also. ...
-How To Make The Hands Smooth And Soft
For this purpose there is nothing nicer than the beautiful, fragraut, and delicate composition called Almond Cream, (Creme d'Amandes.) This almond cream (which must not be confounded with another prep...
-How To Remove Corns From Between The Toes
These corns are generally more painful than any others, and are frequently situated as to be almost inaccessible to the usual remedies. Wetting them several times a day with hartshorn will in most cas...
-How To Allay Pain In The Feet When Caused By Fatigue
If your feet become painful from walking or standing too long, put them as soon as you can into warm salt and water, mixed in the proportion of two large handfuls of salt to a gallon of water. Sea-wat...
-Relief For Rheumatic Pains
Bathe the afflicted part at night and morning, and frequently through the day, with warm salt and water, (mixed in the proportion of two handfuls of salt to a quart of water,) rubbing it well into the...
-Relief For A Sprained Ankle
Wash the ankle very frequently with cold salt and water, which is far better than warm vinegar or decoctions of herbs. Keep your foot as cool as possible to prevent inflammation; and sit with it eleva...
-Bathing The Feet
In bathing the feet of a sick person, use at the beginning, tepid or lukewarm water. Have ready in a tea-kettle or covered pitcher, some hot water, of which pour in a little at intervals; so as gradua...
-Cure For A Run-Round
That disease of the finger or toe commonly called a run-round, may be easily cured by a remedy so simple that persons who have not seen it tried are generally incredulous as to its efficacy. The first...
-How To Apply An Eye-Stone
Eye-stones are frequently used to extract motes from the eye, sparks from steam-engines, and other extraneous substances. They are to be procured at the druggists'. They cost but two or three cents a ...
-Cures For Common Ailments
Cure For The Tetter Obtain at a druggist's an ounce of sulphuret of potash. Be careful to ask for this article precisely. It is a preparation of sulphur and potash. Put the sulphuret into a large g...
-Cures For Common Ailments. Part 2
Red Lip Salve Mix together equal portions of the best suet and the best lard. There must be no salt about them. Boil slowly, and skim and stir the mixture. Then add a small thin bag of alkanet chip...
-Cures For Common Ailments. Part 3
Remedy For Arsenic Dissolve a few scruples of sulphuret of potash in half a pint, or a pint of water, and administer it a little at a time, as the patient can bear it; having first given the white ...
-Cures For Common Ailments. Part 4
Fine Lavender Compound For this purpose, use lavender buds, gathered just before they are ready to blow. As soon as the blossom expands into a flower, a portion of its strength and fragrance immedi...
-How To Prevent A Jug Of Molasses From Running Over
A jug or bottle of molasses frequently causes inconvenience by working over at the top, after coming from the grocer's, and being set in a room or closet that is warmer than the place from which it wa...
-How To Extinguish A Coal Fire
Many persons who burn anthracite coal in their chambers, have suffered great inconvenience from not knowing how to extinguish it before they go to bed. The process is very simple, and always successfu...
-How To Extract Spermaceti From Me-Rixo
If spermaceti has accidentally been dropped from a candle on a merino dress, carefully remove as much as you can with a knife, without scraping the texture. Then hold the greased place before the fire...
-How To Make Soda Soap
Take six pounds of the best brown soap, and cut it into pieces. Put it into a large wash-kettle, and pour on seven gallons and a half of clear soft water. Next stir in six pounds of washing-soda, (sub...
-Cold Starch For Linen
Take a quarter of a pint, or as much of the best raw starch as will half fill a common-sized tumbler. Fill it nearly up with very clear cold water. Mix it well with a spoon, pressing out all the lumps...
-How To Wash White Satin Ribbon
Make a strong lather of clear cold water and the best white soap. Squeeze and press the ribbon through this, till it looks quite clean; but do not rub it, as that will cause it to fray. Then make a fr...
-How To Clean Silk Shawls Or Scarfs
Mix together a quarter of a pound of soft soap; a tea-spoonful of brandy; and a pint of whisky or gin; stirring them hard. Spread the shawl on a clean linen cloth, and with a clean sponge dipped in th...
-How To Clean A Silk Dress
Rip the dress entirely apart. Take large raw potatoes, and allow a pint of cold water to each potatoe. Having pared the potatoes, grate them into the basin of water. Cover it; and let it stand three h...
-French Method Of Washing Coloured Silk Cravats, Scarfs, Shawls, Etc
Make a mixture of the following: articles in a large flat dish. A large table-spoonful of soft soap, or of hard brown soap shaved fine, (white soap will not do,) a small tea-spoonful of strained honey...
-How To Make Thread Lace Look Always New
Thread lace should never be sewed fast, or washed upon the article of which it forms the trimming. It should be merely run on, or basted with short stitches; so as to draw out the thread easily, wh...
-How To Wash Lace
Washing Black Lace Every description of black si/k lace (or of black Scotch blond) may be made to look extremely well by the following process; either veils, shawls, scarfs, capes, sleeves, or trim...
-How To Clean Gold Or Silver Embroidery
Warm some spirits of wine, and apply it with a bit of clean sponge. Then dry it, by rubbing it with soft, new canton flannel. Gold or silver lace may be cleaned thus. Also, jewelry. ...
-Washing American Chintzes
American chintzes, of good quality, (such as are sold at twelve or fourteen cents per yard,) can be washed so as to retain their colours, and look as bright as when quite new. The water must be qui...
-Preserving The Colours Of Dresses
Before washing a new dress, try a small piece of the material, and see if the colours are likely to stand of themselves. They are generally fast, if the article is so well printed that the wrong side ...
-Putting Away Woollens
The introduction of furnaces, for the purpose of warming houses, is supposed to be one cause of the great increase of moths, cockroaches, and other insects that now, more than ever, infest our dwellin...
-How To Clean White Fur
Take a sufficiency of dry starch, very finely powdered, and sift it, through a fine sieve, into a broad, clean, tin pan. Set the pan near enough the fire for the powdered starch to get warm, stirring ...
-How To Keep A Muff
Always when returning a muff to its box, give it several hard twirls round. This will smooth the fur, and make all the hairs lie the same way. To prevent the wadding inside the muff from sinking downw...
-Taking Care Of Pictures
An excellent way to preserve an oil-picture from the injuries of damp, mould, and mildew, is to take the precaution of covering the back of the canvas (before nailing it on the straining frame) with a...
-Travelling Boxes
As bandboxes are no longer visible among the baggage-articles of ladies, the usual way of carrying bonnets, caps, muslins, etc, is in tall square wooden boxes, covered with black canvas or leather, ed...
-Travelling Boxes. Continued
A Lady's Shoe-Bag Take a piece of strong linen or ticking. Fold or double it so as to leave a flap to turn over at the top. Then, with very strong thread, stitch the bag into compartments - each di...
-A Travelling-Case For Combs And Brushes
Get about three-quarters of a yard of strong oiled silk of the best quality - double it - leaving one side, at the top, about half a quarter longer than the other, so as to fold over like a flap. Sew ...
-How To Carry Ink When Travelling
Have ready a small square bag of oiled silk, or thick buckskin, with a narrow tape string sewed on near the top. Buy a small six-cent vial of good ink. The vial must be broad and short with a flat bot...
-Bonnets
Before you send a straw bonnet to be whitened, it will be well to remove whatever stains or grease marks may be upon it. Do this yourself, as many professed bonnet-cleaners are either unacquainted wit...
-How To Keep A Bonnet White
If you have a white velvet or silk bonnet that looks well enough to wear a second season, lay beside it in the bandbox a cake of white wax, (such as you get at an apothecary's for sixpence or a shilli...
-Whalebones And Hooks
The whalebones for dresses should always be perfectly straight, for if crooked they draw the body crooked wherever they are, and give it a warped or puckered look. Let them be stou also; for if thin, ...
-Cutting Out Patterns
In taking the pattern or cutting out the shape of a cape, pelerine, mantilla, or any other article of dress, instead of using a newspaper for that purpose, (according to the general custom,) cut the p...
-How To Hem Bobbinet
In making a collar, pelerine, cape, scarf, or any article of bobbinet, you may hem. it so as to prevent the usual inconvenience and disfigurement of the edges stretching out of shape after being washe...
-How To Strengthen The Hem Of A Silk Dress
In silk dresses the edge of the hem at the bottom of the skirt is apt to wear out (or cut as it is called) very soon, and look faggled or ravelled. To prevent this, get some broad worsted braid of the...
-How To Make A Coat-Dress Or Gown Sit In Closely To The Waist
On finishing the dress, take about a yard and a half (more or less) of rather broad twilled tape. Sew the tape strongly in three places to the lower extremity of the inside of the back, exactly where ...
-Directions For Working Slippers
Haifa yard of canvas is a full pattern for a large pain of slippers. If the canvas is of extra width, three quarters of a yard will make two pair. It is well to get your shoemaker to cut out for you t...
-How To Braid Merino Dresses Or Cloaks For Children
Patterns for braiding should be as continuous as possible, so as to avoid frequent cutting off and fastening on of the braid. These patterns should have nothing in them that stops short; all the parts...
-Directions For Embroidering Merino
Merino dresses are usually worked in small sprigs, representing a little flower or bud, with two or three green leaves. Blue, lilac, or purple flowers have generally a more tasteful effect for this pu...
-Directions For Embroidering Merino. Continued
Chinese Embroidery For this purpose, the embroidery-frame must be placed in a perpendicular or upright position, and two persons employed together; both equally skilled in needle-work. Get a carpen...
-Fine Colouring For Artificial Flowers
For light blue and pink, buy, at a drug or paint store, what are called blue saucers and pink saucers., They contain the most beautiful tints of these colours. To use them, take a large clean camel's-...
-Directions For Making A Tabouret
A tabouret is a square stool, tall enough for a grown person to sit on, and about the usual height of a chair. Get a carpenter to make a strong square box of well-seasoned wood, planed smooth both ins...
-The Summer Hearth
Summer blowers, of handsomely ornamented iron, are now much used to conceal the empty coal-grates, during the season of warm weather. Like chimney-boards, they render the room very close, by entirely ...
-Tissue-Paper Hearth Curtains
There is an infinite variety of patterns for tissue-paper drapery to conceal empty coal-grates. The most simple is to take a sufficient number of long sheets of this paper; fold each sheet, lengthways...
-Marking The Keys Of A Piano
Beginners on the piano (children especially) sometimes find much difficulty in learning the affinity between the keys and the notes. After acquiring the gamut theoretically, it is frequently a long ti...
-How To Use A Paper-Knife
In using a paper-knife to cut open the leaves of a new book, keep your left hand firmly pressed down upon the open page, while you hold the knife in your right. This will prevent the edges of the leav...
-Household Tools
Much inconvenience and considerable expense would be saved, if it was the universal custom to keep in every house a few tools, for the purpose of performing at home what are called small jobs; instead...
-Tip On Writing Letters
For letter-writing, always use good paper; it should be fine, smooth, white, and sufficiently thick not to let the writing show through on the other side. Very good letter-paper can seldom be purchase...
-Crossing The Sea
The most usual voyage made by American ladies is across the Atlantic; and the time chosen for that voyage is generally in the spring or autumn. A winter passage is seldom attempted by ladies; and few ...
-Breakfast, Dinners, Suppers, Etc
At the earnest request of numerous young housekeepers, the author has been induced to offer the following hints for the selection of suitable articles in preparing breakfasts, dinners, and suppers. Th...
-Economical Dinners For Small Families
The receipts for these plain dishes are generally to be found in Miss Leslie's Directions for Cookery, a work to which the present book is supplemental. Spring Boiled ham; spinach; asparag...
-Economical Dinners For Small Families. Part 2
Sea-shore dinner Chowder; crabs; broiled mackerel; potatoes - Raisin pudding. Plain Dinners For Autumn Fresh pork, stewed with sweet potatoes; lima beans; tomatoes; com - Plum pie. Roa...
-Economical Dinners For Small Families. Part 3
Plain Dinners For Winter Boiled ham cabbage; beets; cold-slaw; hominy - Apple pie. Chicken pie; cold ham; turnips; beets; hominy-Boiled batter pudding. Pease soup; beef-steaks; onions; turnip...
-Very Nice Family Dinners For Spring
Spring soup; roast fillet of veal; (potatoes always;) peas; stewed spinach - Rhubarb pie; custards. Stewed, rock-fish: roast lamb with mint sauce; peas; asparagus; poke - Goosebeny pie; boiled cust...
-Very Nice Family Dinners For Spring. Part 2
Sea-shore dinner Oyster soup; clam pie; stewed rock-fish; crabs; mashed potatoes - Boiled lemon pudding. Very Nice Autumn Dinners For Families Autumn soup; Roast fowls; smoked tongue; lim...
-Very Nice Family Dinners For Spring. Part 3
Christmas And New Years' Dinners Boiled turkey with oyster sauce; two roast geese with apple sauce; roasted ham; chicken pie; stewed beets; cold-slaw; turnips; salsify; winter-squash - Plum pudding...
-Company Dinners - Spring
1. Oyster soup; boiled sheep's-head fish; roasted ham; white fricassee; chickens stewed whole; terrapin veal; sweetbread croquettes; asparagus; stewed peas; stewed spinach; fried celery; maccaroni - L...
-Company Dinners - Spring. Part 2
Sea-shore dinner Clam soup; roast salmon; boiled ham; sea-coast pie; stewed oysters; fried oysters; stewed lobster; crabs; baked clams; mashed potatoes-Biscuit pudding; sweetmeat fritters; cake syl...
-Company Dinners - Spring. Part 3
Christmas dinners Mock turtle soup; stewed rock-fish; roasted ham; roasted venison with currant-jelly; boiled turkey with oyster sauce; roast geese with apple sauce; French oyster pie; fricasseed c...
-Large Dinner Parties
1. Spring Rich brown soup at one end; rich white soup at the other; two dishes of sheep's-head fish, one baked, one stewed, or else baked salmon-trout and cream trout; roasted ham; smoked tongue; c...
-Tea Parties
Have black tea, green tea, and coffee. Immediately after the first cups are sent in, let fresh tea be put into the pots, that the second cups may not be weaker than the first. With the cream and sugar...
-Supper Dishes For A Large Company
*Boned turkey with jelly; partridge pie; game dressed in various ways; cold ham glazed thickly all over with a mixture of bread-crumbs, cream, and yolk of egg; two smoked tongues, one placed whole in ...
-How To Make Buena Vista Cake
Put half a pound of powdered white sugar into a deep pan, and cut up in it half a pound of fresh butter. Stir them together hard, till perfectly light. Add a nutmeg powdered. (This cake should be high...
-How To Make Yeast-Powders
Get at a druggist's a pound of super-car. bonate of soda, and three-quarters of a pound of tartaric acid. Both these articles must be of the very best quality. Prepare an equal number of square blue p...
-How To Make Fine Wafer Cakes
Wash and squeeze half a pound of fresh butter in a pan of cold water. Then take it out, and cut it up in another pan, into which you have sifted half a pound of powdered white sugar; and stir them tog...
-How To Make Lancaster Gingerbread
Cut up a quarter of a pound of fresh butter into two pounds of sifted flour; rub it well in, and add a small teacup of ground ginger, and a tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon. Stir in a pint and a half...
-Ay Arm Icing For Cakes
Beat to a stiff froth the whites of four eggs; then beat into them, gradually, (a spoonful at a time,) a pound of finely-powdered loaf-sugar. Next put the beaten white of egg and sugar into a very cle...
-How To Make Cinnamon Bread
On a bread-baking day, (having made more than your usual quantity of wheat bread,) when the dough has risen quite light, so as to be cracked all over the surface, take out as much as would suffice for...
-How To Make Snow Cream
Take a large pint of very rich cream, and half a pound of the best loaf-sugar, powdered. Rub off, on a lump of sugar, the yellow rind of three large lemons or oranges, (or, four or five, if small;) sc...
-Lemon Or Orange Honey
Lemon Honey Take three large ripe lemons, (or four or five small ones,) and (having rolled them under your hand on a table, to increase the juice,) rub off on a piece of loaf-sugar the yellow rind ...
-How To Keep Pine-Apples, Without Cooking
Take large fine pine-apples - the ripest you can procure Pare and slice them thin, removing the hard core from the centre. Weigh the slices, and to each pound allow a pound of double-refined powdered ...
-How To Make Marmalade
Fine Pine-Apple Marmalade Take pineapples of large size, and as ripe as possible. Having removed the green leaves, cut each pine-apple (without paring) into four quarters; and then, with a large co...
-How To Make Marmalade. Continued
Pear Marmalade Take large fine juicy pears. Pare, core, and cut them up into small pieces. Weigh the pieces; and to every two pounds allow a pound and a half of sugar, and the grated peel and juice...
-Yankee Apple Pudding
Butter the bottom and inside of a deep tin pan. Pare, core, and quarter six or eight large, fine, juicy apples; and strew among them a heaped half-pint or more of broken sugar. Dissolve a tea-spoonful...
-Filet Gumbo
Cut up a pair of fine plump fowls into pieces, as when carving. Lay them in a pan of cold water, till all the blood is drawn out. Put into a pot, two large table-spoonfuls of lard, and set it over the...
-Fine Cabbage Soup
Take a fine large cabbage, and, after removing the outside leaves, and cutting the stalk short, divide the cabbage into quarters, more than half way down, but not quite to the stem. Lay the cabbage in...
-Excellent Pickled Cabbage
Shred very fine, with a cabbage-cutter, a large fresh red cabbage. Pack it down (with a little salt sprinkled between each layer) in a large stone jar. The jar should be three parts full of the shred ...
-How To Cook Madeira Ham
Take a ham of the very finest sort; a Westphalia one, if you can obtain it. Soak it in water all day and all night; changing the water several times. A Westphalia ham should be soaked two days and nig...
-New Way Of Dressing Terrapins
In buying terrapins, select those only that are large, fat, and thick-bodied. Put them whole into water that is boiling hard at the time, and (adding a little salt) boil them till thoroughly done thro...
-How To Make Pot-Pie
A Terrapin Pot-Pie Take several fine large terrapins, the fattest and thickest you can get. Put them into a large pot of water that is boiling hard; and boil them half an hour or more. Then take th...
-Broiled Mushrooms
Take the largest and finest fresh mushrooms. Peel them, and cut off the stems as closely as possible. Lay the mushrooms on -their backs, upon a large flat dish; and into the hollow or cup of each put ...
-An Easy Way To Pickle Mushrooms
Take two quarts of small freshly-gathered mushrooms. With a sharp-pointed knife peel off, carefully, their thin outside skin; and cut off the stalks closely. Prepare eight little bags of very thin cle...
-How To Make Breakfast Rolls
These rolls must be mixed the night before, near bed-time. Sift three quarts of flour into a deep pan, and cut up into it a half-pint cup-full (or a quarter of a pound) of fresh butter. Rub the butter...
-How To Make Buckwheat Batter Pudding
Mix early in the day, a quart of buckwheat meal with a large teacup full of Indian meal or of wheat flour; and add a tea-spoonful of salt. Have ready some water, warm but not boiling; and stir it grad...
-How To Make Buckwheat Porridge
Boil a quart of rich milk, and when it has come to a hard boil, stir in, gradually, as much buckwheat meal as will make it of the consistence of very thick mush, adding a tea-spoon of salt, (not more,...
-How To Make Apple Tapioca
Take a quart bowl, and half fill it with tapioca: then fill it very nearly to the top with cold water, allowing a little space for the tapioca to swell in soaking. Cover it, and let it stand all night...
-How To Make Terua Firma
Take a piece of rennet about four inches square, and wash it in two or three cold waters to get off all the salt. Then wipe it dry, put it into a cup, and pour on sufficient lukewarm water to cover it...
-How To Use Cold Pudding
If you have a large piece of boiled pudding left after dinner, (such as plum pudding, indian pudding, or batter pudding,) and you wish to cook it next day, tie it up in a cloth, and put it into a pot ...
-How To Keep Eggs
Break some glue into pieces, and boil it in sufficient water to make a thin solution. While warm, dip a brush into it, and go carefully over every egg. They must all be quite fresh. When the eggs are ...
-Fine French Mustard
Take a sufficient quantity of green tarragon leaves, (picked from the stalks) and put them into a wide-mouthed glass jar till it is half full; pressing them down hard. Then fill up the jar with the be...
-A Washington Pudding
Pick, and wash clean half a pound of Zante currants; drain them, and wipe them in a towel, and then spread them out on a flat dish, and place them before the fire to dry thoroughly. Prepare about a qu...
-New Way Of Washing Silk
For ribbons, cravats, and other small articles of silk, put a sufficiency of the best fresh camphine oil into a large basin, and press and squeeze the things well through it, without either soap or wa...
-How To Save Stair-Carpets
Stair-carpets always wear out first (and sometimes very soon) at those parts that go against the edges or ledges of the stairs. They will last much longer at the edges, (indeed, as long as any other p...
-Spermaceti, To Extract From Carpets Or Clothes
There is no better way of removing spermaceti, than, (after scraping off with a knife as much as you can get from the surface of the spot,) to cover it with a piece of clean blotting paper, or any pap...
-Cheap Oil For Kitchen Lamps
Let all scraps of fat (including even whatever bits are left on the dinner-plates) and all drippings be carefully saved, and put into an earthen crock, covered, and set in a cold place. When the crock...
-Belief For Corns
Experience proves that there is scarcely a possibility of removing corns on the feet, so that they will never return. The following remedy we know to be an excellent palliative; it will for a time dim...
-Broiled Canvas Back Ducks
To have these ducks with their flavour and juices in perfection, they should be cooked immediately after killing. If shot early in the morning, let them be broiled for breakfast; if killed in the fore...
-Autumn Leaves
The autumnal colours of our American forest trees are justly admired for the brightness, richness, and variety of their tints. Some of our fair countrywomen have worn them in Europe, formed into wreat...
-How To Make Charlotte Russe
Madeira Charlotte Russe Take one ounce of gelatine, or of the very best Russia isinglass, and soak it, near half an hour, in as much cold water as will barely cover it. It must merely soften, and n...
-How To Make Almond Ice-Cream
To every quart of cream, allow two ounces of shelled sweet almonds, and two ounces of shelled bitter almonds. Blanch the almonds in scalding water, and then throw them into cold water; afterwards, put...
-How To Make Chocolate Ice-Cbeam
Chocolate used for this purpose must have neither sugar nor spice in it. Baker's Prepared Cocoa is the best. For each quart of cream, scrape down three large ounces of cocoa or chocolate, put it into ...
-How To Make Orange Or Lemon Ice-Cream
Orange Ice-Cream To each quart of cream, allow two fine ripe oranges, and three-quarters of a pound of loaf-sugar. Rub the yellow rinds of the oranges upon a large lump of sugar, and scraping it of...
-How To Make Jelly
Wine Jelly Take three ounces of Cooper's isinglass or gelatine, and soak it in cold water during five minutes. Then take it out and put it into a preserving kettle, and dissolve it in two quarts of...
-How To Make Farina
Farina is a very fine and delicate preparation made from the inner part of the grain of new wheat. It is exceedingly nutritious, and excellent, either for invalids or for persons in health. It is now ...
-How To Make Farina Flummery Or Blancmange
From a quart of rich milk take out a half pint. Put the half-pint into a small sauce-pan, and add to it a handful of bitter almonds broken up; or a bunch of fresh peach-leaves; or a vanilla bean split...
-How To Make Farina Flummery Or Blancmange. Continued
Roxbury Tea Cake On bread-making day take a pound or a quart of very light wheaten bread-dough, just before the loaves are put into the oven. Lay it in an earthen pan, and mix in, gradually, and al...
-How To Make Pollo Valenciano
This is also a Spanish dish. Cut up a large fine fowl into pieces. Wipe them clean and dry, but do not wash them or lay them in water. Put into a broad sauce-pan, a tea-cup of sweet oil, and a bit of ...
-Spanish Salad
A Spanish proverb says that for compounding a good salad, four persons are required - a spendthrift for oil; a miser for vinegar; a counsellor for salt, (or a man of judgment;) and a madman for stirri...
-Carolina Way Of Boiling Rice
Pick the rice carefully, and wash it through two or three cold waters till it is quite clean. Then (having drained off all the water through a cullender) put the rice into a pot of boiling water, with...
-A Nice Way Of Cooking Asparagus
Where asparagus is plenty, there is no better way of cooking it than the following. Take it as nearly of a size as possible, wash it, and cut off the stalks very short; leaving them not more than half...
-A Nice Way Of Cooking Asparagus. Continued
Curry Balls Take a sufficiency of finely-grated bread-crumbs; hard-boiled yolk of egg, grated; fresh butter; and a little curry powder. Pound the whole in a mortar, moistening it with raw yolk of e...
-How To Prepare Lard
As soon it is cut off from the newly-killed pork, put the fat into a crock; cover it; and let it stand all night in a cool place. Next day, cut it into small bits, (carefully removing all the fleshy p...
-Brine For Ham Or Bacon
To every four gallons of water, allow four pounds of salt; two ounces of salt-petre; three pounds of sugar, and two quarts of molasses. Boil the whole together; skimming it well. When clear, let it co...
-Hog's Head Cheese
Hog's head cheese is always made at what is called killing-time. To make, four cheeses of moderate size, take one large hog's head, two sets of feet, and the noses of all the pigs that have been kil...
-Frying Fish
Fish should be fried in fresh butter or lard; a large allowance of which must be put by itself into the frying-pan, and held over a clear fire till it becomes so hot as to boil hard in the pan. Till i...
-How To Make Axjar Pickles
Take a variety of young fruits or vegetables, and put them into strong salt and water for three days; stirring them well, night and morning. Then take them out, and spread them on trays, or old server...
-How To Make Axjar Pickles. Continued
How To Pickle Peppers, Small Cucumbers, And Beans Put all these vegetables together into a brine strong enough to bear up an egg to the surface; and let them stay in it for three days. Then take th...
-How To Keep String Beans And Green Peas
String the beans, (which should be full grown but not old,) and cut them into three pieces - not more. Pack them in wide-mouthed stone-jars; a layer of beans and a thin layer of fine salt. The day bef...
-How To Make Scotch Short-Cake
Take a pound of Zante currants; and, after they are well picked and washed, dry them on a large dish before the fire, or on the top of a stove. Instead of currants, you may use sultana or seedless rai...
-How To Make Rice Waffles
Take a teacup and a half, or a common sized tumbler-full and a half, of rice that has been well boiled, and warm it in a pint of rich milk, stirring it till smooth and thoroughly mixed. Then remove it...
-Hints On Heating Ovens, And Baking
Brick ovens are generally heated with dry fagots or small branches, or with light split wood. For baking bread, the oven-wood must be heavier than for pies. A heap of wood should be placed in the cent...
-Dried Corn Meal Yeast Cakes
Half a pound of fresh hops. - Four quarts of water. - A pint of wheat or rye flour. - Half a pint of strong fresh yeast, from the brewer or baker. - Three pints, or more of Indian meal. Boil half a po...
-Excellent Home-Made Yeast
Yeast should always be kept in a glass bottle or a stone jug, and never in earthen or metal. Before you make fresh yeast, empty entirely the vessel that has contained the last; and if of stone, scald ...
-How To Make Indian Bread, Or Pone
Four quarts of Indian meal sifted. - A large half pint of wheat Hour. - A heaping table-spoonful of salt. - Half a pint of strong fresh yeast. - A quart of warm water. - Sift into a large deep pan, th...
-How To Make Indian Bread, Or Pone. Continued
Indian Rye Bread Two quarts of Indian meal. Two quarts of rye meal. - Three pints of milk or water. Two teaspoonfuls of salt. - Half a pint of strong fresh yeast. Having sifted the rye and Indian m...
-How To Make Mush
Indian Mush Have ready on a clear fire, a pot of boiling water. Stir into it, by degrees, (a handful at at a time,) sufficient Indian meal to make a very thick porridge, and then add a very small p...
-Common Hoe-Cake
Take an earthen or tin pan, and half fill it with coarse Indian meal, which had best be sifted in. Add a little salt. Have ready a kettle of boiling water. Pour into the Indian meal sufficient hot wat...
-How To Make Common Griddle Cake
A quart of Indian meal. - Sufficient warm water to make a soft dough. - A small tea-spoonful of salt. - Put the Indian meal into a pan, and add the salt. Make a hole in the centre of the meal, and pou...
-How To Make Johnny Cake
Plain Johnny Cake A quart of Indian meal. - A pint of warm water. - A level tea-spoonful of salt. - Sift a quart of Indian meal into a pan. Make a hole in the middle, and pour in a pint of warm wat...
-Very Plain Indian Cakes
Very Plain Indian Dumplings Sift some Indian meal into a pan; add about a salt-spoon of salt to each quart of meal; and scald it with sufficient boiling water to make a stiff dough. Pour in the wat...
-Indian Muffins
A pint and a half of yellow Indian meal, sifted. - A handful of wheat flour. - A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. - A quart of milk. - Four eggs. - A very small tea-spoonful of salt. Put the milk i...
-Virginia Griddle Cakes
A quart of Indian meal. - Two large table-spoonfuls of wheat flour. - A heaped salt-spoon of salt. - A piece of fresh butter, about two ounces. - Four eggs. - A pint, or more, of milk. Sift the Indian...
-How To Make Missouri Cakes
Three large pints of yellow Indian meal. - A pint of cold water. - A tea-spoonful of salt. - A level tea-spoonful of sal-eratus or soda dissolved in a little warm water. - A large table-spoonful of be...
-How To Make Indian Slap-Jacks
A quart of yellow Indian meal. - Half a pint or more of boiling water. - Half a pint of wheat flour. - Three large table-spoonfuls of strong fresh yeast. - A heaping salt-spoon of salt. - A level tea-...
-How To Make Indian Flappers
A quart of sifted Indian meal. - A handful of wheat flour. - A quart of milk. - Four eggs. - A heaping salt-spoon of salt. Mix together the Indian and wheat meal, adding the salt. Beat the eggs light ...
-How To Make Breakfast Cakes
Corn Meal Breakfast Cakes A quart of Indian meal. - A handful, or more, of wheat flour. - A large salt-spoon of salt. - A quart of warm water. - An additional pint of lukewarm water. - A bit of pea...
-Excellent Buckwheat Cakes
A quart of buckwheat meal, sifted. - A level tea-spoonful of salt. - A small half-pint, or a large handful of Indian meal. - Two large table-spoonfuls of strong fresh brewer's yeast, or four table-spo...
-Nice Rye Batter Cakes
A quart of lukewarm milk. - Two eggs. - A large table-spoonful of fresh brewer's yeast, or two of home-made yeast. - Sufficient sifted rye meal to make a moderate batter. - A salt-spoon of salt. Havin...
-Indian Light Biscuit
A quart of sifted Indian meal. - A pint of sifted wheat flour. - A very small tea-spoonful of salt. - Three pints of milk. - Four eggs. Sift the Indian and wheat meal into a pan, and add the salt. Mix...
-How To Make Indian Cupcakes
A pint and a half of yellow Indian meal. - Haifa pint of wheat flour. - A pint and a half of sour milk; buttermilk is best. - A small tea-spoonful of sal-eratus or soda, dissolved in warm water. - Two...
-Kentucky Sweet Cake
A pint of fine yellow Indian meal, sifted. - Half a pint of wheat flour. - Half a pound of powdered white sugar. - Half a pound of fresh butter. - Eight eggs. - A powdered nutmeg. - A large tea-spoonf...
-How To Make Carolina Cakes
Carolina Rice Cakes Having picked and washed half a pint of rice, boil it by itself till the grains lose all form and are dissolved into a thick mass, or jelly. While warm, mix into it a large lump...
-How To Make Madison Pudding
A pint and a half of sifted yellow corn meal. - Half a pint of wheat flour. - Half a pint of sour milk. - Half a pint of powdered white sugar. - Half a pound of fresh butter. - Six eggs. - A gill, or ...
-How To Make Nantucket Pudding
Six large ears of Indian corn; full grown, but young and soft. - A pint of milk. - A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. - A quarter of a pound of sugar. - Four eggs. - Half a nutmeg grated, and five ...
-How To Make Samp Pudding
A pint of samp that has been boiled, and grown cold. - A pint of milk. - Three large table-spoonfuls of fresh butter. - Three large table-spoonfuls of sugar, or half a pint of West India molasses. - S...
-A Farmer's Indian Pudding
Three small pints of sifted Indian meal, the yellow sort. - A quart of rich milk. - A pint of West India molasses. - A table-spoonful of ground cinnamon, or ginger. Before you begin, set over the fire...
-A Very Nice Boiled Indian Pudding
Three Pints Of Sifted Indian Meal. Half a pound of beef-suet, minced as fine as possible. - A quart of milk. - Half a pint of West India molasses. - Six eggs. - Three or four sticks of cinnamon, broke...
-Baked Corn Meal Pudding
A pint of sifted Indian meal. - Half a pint of West India molasses. - A quarter of a pound of fresh butter. - A pint of milk. - Four eggs. - The yellow rind of a large fresh orange or lemon grated. - ...
-Pumpkin Indian Pudding
Take a pint and a half of cold stewed pumpkin, and mix into it a pint and a half of Indian meal, adding a table-spoonful of ground ginger. Boil a quart of milk, and as soon as you take it from the fir...
-How To Boil Indian Corn
Corn for boiling should be full grown, but young and tender, and the grains soft and milky. If its grains are becoming hard and yellow, it is too old for boiling. Strip the cars of their leaves and th...
-How To Cook Summer Saccatash
String a quarter of a peck of young green beans, and cut each bean into three pieces (not more) and do not split them. Have by you a pan of cold water, and throw the beans into it as you cut them. Hav...
-How To Cook Hominy
Hominy is white Indian corn, shelled from the cob, divested of the outer skin by scalding in hot lye, and then winnowed and dried. It is perfectly white. Having washed it through two or three waters, ...
-How To Keep Indian Corn For Cooking
Take the corn when it is young and tender, and barely full-grown. Let it remain on the cob till you have boiled it ten or fifteen minutes (not more) in a large pot of slightly-salted water that must b...
-Excellent Receipt For Pork And Beans
Take a good piece of pickled pork (not very fat) and to each pound of pork allow a quart of dried white beans. The bone should be removed from the pork, and the beans well picked and washed. The eveni...
-Iced Plum-Pudding
Take two dozen sweet and two dozen bitter almonds. Blanch them in scalding water, and then throw them into a bowl of cold water. Pound them, one at a time, in a mortar, till they become a smooth paste...
-How To Make Iced Pine-Apple Pudding
Take two fine ripe pine-apples, of the largest size. Cut off and throw away the points or withered blossoms from the surface of the outside. Then pare off the rind, and cut the paring into small piece...
-How To Make Tansey Pudding
Take a quarter of a pound of stale sponge-cake, (almond sponge-cake is best,) and grate it finely. Pound, in a mortar, sufficient fresh spinach to yield a half-pint, or a large teacup-full of juice. T...
-How To Make Victoria Pudding
Take a large pint of stewed apple or a quart of stewed gooseberries, made very sweet with plenty of sugar mixed in after it is stewed. If the sugar is put in at first, along with the fruit, it will re...
-Maids Of Honour
The night previous to making these cakes, cut a piece of rennet about four inches square, wash off carefully all the salt from the outside, wipe the rennet dry, and put it into a cup to soak, with suf...
-A Charlotte Meringue
Take half a pound of the best maccaroons, (such as are made with both sweet and bitter almonds,) lay them in the bottom of a deep dish, sprinkle them well with powdered loaf-sugar, and pour on suffici...
-Burlington Cakes
Take as much sliced wheat bread (after removing the crust) as will weigh three-quarters of a pound. Warm two quarts of rich milk, and pour it hot over the bread, in a deep pan. Cover it, and when it h...
-How To Preserve Orange
Take a sufficiency of large ripe sweet oranges, with thin smooth rinds. Roll each orange under your hand, upon a table, to increase the juice. Cut a large slit in the side, and squeeze them through a ...
-Pearled Fruit
Take bunches of fine ripe grapes, or large currants, either red or white. Beat, in a broad pan, some white of egg, with one-third its quantity of cold water. Dip the fruit into this, so as to wet it w...
-Pound Pears
These are large rough, greenish brown pears, that are considered to weigh a pound. They will keep all winter, and can be cooked at any time. Raw, they are so hard as to be unfit for eating; but they m...
-How To Prepare Cochineal
Powder an ounce of cochineal, and put it into an earthen pipkin, with threequarters of an ounce of powdered cream of tartar, and a piece of alum about the size of a hickory-nut, also powdered. Add a q...
-Fine Mock-Turtle Soup
Having cleaned and prepared a fine calf's head, put it into a soup-pot with an ample quantity of water, (sprinkling in a very little salt,) and boil it gently during four hours; skimming it well. Half...
-How To Wash Pina Handkerchiefs
Pina is a very elegant and exquisitely fine sort of cambric, manufactured in India and China, from the leaves (it is said) of the pine-apple, converted into a fibrous pith, and then spun and woven, an...
-How To Make Sponge-Cake
Molasses Plumb Cake Stir a half-pint cup-full of fresh butter into one of brown sugar. Mix together a half-pint milk, and a half-pint of West India molasses. Add a tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon...
-How To Make Corn Soup
Sweet-Corn Soup Take a knuckle of veal, break the bones, score the meat deeply, and put it into a soup-pot. Allow rather less than a quart of water to each pound of veal; and add a hock of cold ham...
-A Catalogue To Read Over
BOOKS SENT EVERYWHERE FREE OF POSTAGE. BOOKS FOR EVERYBODY, AT GREATLY REDUCED RATES. PUBLISHED AND FOR SALE BY T. B. PETERSON, No. 102 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. IN THIS CATALOGUE WILL...
-A Catalogue To Read Over. Part 2
Captain Marryatt's Works Either of which can be had separately. Price of all except the two last are 25 cents each, or any five of them for One Dollar. They are printed on the finest white paper, a...
-A Catalogue To Read Over. Part 3
G. P. R. James's Best Works The Belle of the Court; or, One in a Thousand............................ 25 Count de Castleneu.................... 25 Philip Augustus........................ 25 ...
-A Catalogue To Read Over. Part 4
Bulwer's Novels The Last Days of Pompeii........... 25 Eugene Aram............................ 25 Pelham; or, The Adventures of a Gentleman.............................. 25 Zanoui............
-A Catalogue To Read Over. Part 5
Punch's Humorous Library Mrs. Caudle's Curtain Lectures. By Punch. With Engravings and Woodcuts. New edition, from the revised London issue... 25 Punch's Complete Letter-Writer. 10 Plates........
-Alexander Dumas' Works
The Iron Mask, or the Feats and Adventures of Raoul de Bragelonne. Being the conclusion of The Three Guardsmen, Twenty Years After, and Bragelonne. By Alexandre Dumas. Complete in two large volu...
-Charles Lever's Novels
Cliarles O'Malley, the Irish Dragoon. By Charles Lever, Complete in one large octavo volume of 324 pages. Price Fifty cents; or handsomely bound in one volume, illustrated. Price One Dollar. The Kn...
-W. Harrison Ainsworth's Works
The Illustrated Tower of London. By William Harrison Ainsworth With 100 splendid engravings. It is beyond all doubt one of the most interesting works ever published in the known world, and can be read...
-George Lippard's Works
Washington and His Generals; or, Legends of the American Revolution. Complete in two large octavo volumes of 538 pages, printed on the finest white paper. Price for the entire work, One Dollar. The...
-Professor Liebig's Works On Chemistry
Agricultural Chemistry. Chemistry in its application to Agriculture and Physiology. 135 pages. Price 25 cents. Animal Chemistry. Chemistry in its application to Physiology and Pathology 111 pages. ...
-French, German, Spanish, Latin & Italian Languages
Any person unacquainted with either of these languages, can, with the aid of these works, be enabled to read, write and speak the language of either, without the aid of a teacher, or any oral instruct...
-B. Disraeli's Novels
Vivian Grey. By B. D'Israeli, M. P. Complete in one large octavo volume of 225 pages. Price Fifty cents. The Young Duke: or the Younger Days of George the Fourth. By B. D'Israeli, M. P. One octavo ...
-Works by the Best and Most Popular Authors
The Cahin and Parlor; or, Slaves and Masters. A true history of NORTH AND SOUTH. By J. Thornton Randolph. This book is fully equal in point of interest to Uncle Tom's Cabin. 336 pages. Beautifully...
-Emerson Bennetts Books
Viola; or, Adventures In the Far South-West. By Emerson Bennett, This has been appearing in the columns of the Saturday Evening Post for the last twelve weeks, where it has proved to be one of the mos...
-Miss Leslie's New Receipts For Cooking
Miss Leslie's New Receipts for Cooking of all Kinds. Cakes, Pastry, etc.,etc. Entitled; New Receipts for Cooking, by Miss Leslie, comprising new and approved methods of preparing all kinds of soups,...
-Humorous American Works
Sol. Smith. - Theatrical Apprenticeship and Anecdotal Recollections of Sol. Smith, Esq., Comedian, Lawyer, etc., with eight original designs and illustrations by Darley. Containing Early scenes, Wande...
-Works Of Bulwer, James, And Others
Falkland. A Novel. By Sir K. E. Bulwer, author of The Roue, Oxonian, etc. One volume, octavo. Price 25 cents. The Roue: or the Hazards of Women. By Sir E. L. Bulwer. Price 25 its. The Oxoni...
-Mrs. Southworth's Celebrated Works
The Curse of Clifton; a Tale of Explation and Redemption. By Mrs. Emma D. E. N. Southworth, author of The Discarded Daughter, Virginia and Magdalene, etc. Complete in two volumes of 456 pages...
-A Cook Book For Every Lady And Family. Miss Leslie's New Receipts For Cooking
Miss Leslie's New Receipts for Cooking of all Kinds. Cakes, Pastry, etc, etc. Entitled; More Receipts for Cooking, by-Miss Leslie, comprising now and approved methods of preparing all kinds of soups...
-The Forged Will. By Emerson Bennett
BY EMERSON BENNETT, AUTHOR OF CLARA MORELAND, VIOLA, PIONEER'S DAUGHTER, ETC. THIS CELEBRATED AND BEAUTIFUL WORK is published complete in one large volume, of over 300 pages, paper cover, pri...
-Clara Moreland. By Emerson Bennett
Price Fifty Cents in Paper Cover; or, One Dollar in Cloth, Gilt. Read The Following Opinions Of The Press This novelet, the successive chapters of which our readers have perused with so much in...
-Viola; Or, Adventures In The Far South-West. By Emerson Bennett
By Emerson Bennett, Author Of Clara Moreland, Forged Will, Kate Clarendon, Bride Of The Wilderness, Walde-Warren, Pioneer's Daughter, Etc., Etc. Read The Following Opinions Of The Pre...
-The Roman Traitor; Or, The Days Of Cicero, Cato And Cataline. By Henry William Herbert
BY HENRY WILLIAM HERBERT, AUTHOR OF CROMWELL, THE BROTHERS, ETC. READ THE FOLLOWING OPINIONS OF THE PRESS ABOUT IT. From the Philadelphia Saturday Courier, of Sept. 10th, 1853. This hist...
-Wild Oats Sown Abroad; Or, On And Off Soundings, A New And Exquisitely Original Work
Have you read it? If not, then do so. Price Fifty Cents in Paper; or Seventy Five Cents in Cloth. Wild Oats Sown Abroad is a splendid work. It is the Private Journal of a Gentleman of Leisure an...
-Splendid Portrait Of Henry Clay
NEAGLE'S CORRECT PORTRAIT AND ONLY TRUE LIKENESS EVER PUBLISHED OF HENRY CLAY. T. B. PETERSON, No. 102 Chesnut Street, Philadelphia. PUBLISHES THIS DAY the above Portrait, and most respectfully ...
-The Cabin And Parlor
BY J. THORNTON RANDOLPH. Complete in one volume of 338 pages; full of beautiful illustrations. PRICE ONE DOLLAR A COPY IN CLOTH, GILT; OR FIFTY CENTS IN PAPER COVER. Twenty-two Thousand Copies...
-American Pocket Library Of Useful Knowledge
New and Enlarged Edition! With Numerous Engravings!! TWENTY THOUSAND COPIES SOLD. Price FIFTY CENTS a Copy only; and sent free of Postage to any place in the United States. Containing one tho...
-Life In The South. A Companion To Uncle Tom's Cabin
Complete in one large Octavo volume of 200 pages. Price, Fifty Cents. Embellished with fourteen full page, spirited Illustrations, designed by Darley, and engraved in the finest style of art, and p...
-Pictorial Life And Adventures Of Davy Crockett
Complete in one large Octavo volume of over 200 pages. Price Fifty Cents. Embellished with full page, spirited IIlustrations, designed by Stephens, and engraved in the fiuest style of art. by Heele...
-Choice Works By The Best Authors
Tom Racquett, and his Three Maiden Aunts. Beautifully illustrated................................ 50 Frank Fairleigh; or, Scenes in the Life of a Private Pupil............. 60 Lewis Arundel. By ...







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