BY EMERSON BENNETT, AUTHOR OF "CLARA MORELAND," "VIOLA," "PIONEER'S DAUGHTER," ETC.

THIS CELEBRATED AND BEAUTIFUL WORK is published complete in one large volume, of over 300 pages, paper cover, price FIFTY CENTS; or the work is handsomely bound in one volume, cloth, gilt, price ONE DOLLAR.

ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND COPIES OF THE FORGED WILLI will he sold in a short time, and it will have a run and popularity second only to Uncle Tom's Cabin. The Press everywhere are unanimous in its praise, as being one of the most powerfully written works in the language.

THE FORGED WILL is truly a celebrated work. It has been running through the columns of the Philadelphia Dollar Newspaper, where it has been appearing for ten weeks, and has proved itself to be one of the most popular nouvelettes that has ever appeared in the columns of any newspaper in this country. Before the fourth paper appeared, the back numbers, (although several thousand extra of the three former numbers were printed,) could not be obtained at any price, and the publishers of the paper were forced to issue a Supplement sheet of the first three papers of it, for new subscribers to their paper, which induced the publisher to make an arrangement with the popular author to bring it out in a beautiful style for the thousands that wish it in book form. If Emerson Bennett had never written his many delightful and thrilling stories of border life, of prairie scenes, and Indian warfare, this new story of the 'Forged Will' would have placed his name on the record as one of the best of American novelists. The scenes, principally, of this most captivating novel, are laid in the city of New York; and most glowingly the author pictures to us how the guilty may, for a time, escape the justice of the law, but only to feel the heavy hand of retribution sooner or later; how vice may, for a time, triumph over virtue, but only for a time; how crime may lie concealed, until its very security breeds exposure; how true virtue gives way to no temptation, but bears the ills of life with patience, hoping for a better day, and rejoices triumphant in the end. In short, from base hypocrisy he tears the veil that hides its huge deformity, and gives a true picture of life as it exists in the crowded city. We do cordially recommend this book for its excellent moral. It is one that should be circulated, for it must do good.

Price for the complete work, in one volume, in paper cover, Fifty Cents only; or a finer edition, printed on thicker and better paper, and handsomely bound in one volume, muslin, gilt, is published for One Dollar.

T. B. PETERSON also publishes the following works by Emerson Bennett, either or all of which will be sent by mail, free of postage, to any one, on receipt of the prices annexed to them. All should send for one or more of them at once. No one will ever regret the money sent.

CLARA MORELAND; or. Adventures in the Far South-West. By Emerson Bennett, author of the "The Forged Will," '-Viola." etc. This has proved to be one of the most popular and powerful nouvelettes ever written in America, 33G pages. Price Fifty Cents in paper covers, or ONE DOLLAR in cloth, gilt.

THE PIONEER'S DAUGHTER. By Emerson Bennett, author of "Clars Moreland," "Forged Will," etc. Price 50 cents.

WALDE-WARREN, a Tale of Circumstantial Evidence. By Emerson Bennett, author of "Viola," "Pioneer's Daughter," etc. Price 25 cents.

"VIOLA; or, Adventures in the Far South-West. By Emerson Bennett, author of "The Pioneer's Daughter," "Walde-Warren," etc. Price 50 cents.

Copies of either edition of the above works will be sent to any person at all, to any part of the United States, free of postage, on their remitting the price of the edition they wish, to the publisher, in a letter, post paid. Published and for Sale by T. B. PETERSON, No. 103 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

Read the Notices of the Press below.

BY EMERSON BENNETT, AUTHOR OF "CLARA MORELAND," "VIOLA," "PIONEER'S DAUGHTER," ETC.

Price Fifty Cents in Paper Cover; or, One Dollar in Cloth, Gilt.

From the Philadelphia Saturday Courier, of Oct. 8th, 1853.

"'The Forged Will' is one of the most thrilling productions ever issued from the American press, earnest in its language, rich in incident, and exciting in adventure. While possessing all the attractions of a highly wrought romance, virtue and vice are forcibly contrasted, and sound moral principle eloquently enforced. Hypocrisy is successfully unmasked, and the betrayer and his victim portrayed in a series of highly wrought pictures, that cannot fail to win the heartfelt sympathy of the reader. This work must have an immense sale, for, independent of its intrinsic excellence, the author's previous productions have awakened a lively interest among a large class of readers, an interest which ' The Forged Will' is well calculated to gratify."

From the Boston Literary Museum, of Oct. 8th, 1S53.

"This is a powerfully written domestic romance, which is destined to have a permanent reputation. The characters are boldly drawn, the plot striking, the incidents replete with thrilling interest, and the language and descriptions natural and graphic. Much of the romance must have been founded on fact - an impression which will be entertained by all who read the work, so true to nature are its scenes and characters.

From the Boston Daily Bee, of Sept 30th, 1853.

"This is a production which certainly exhibits a master mind. Tower is the suggestion and evidence of every page. The scene of the novel is laid in New York, and the characters are drawn with wonderful life-likeness and felicity. Those who wish to be both entertained and amused should procure the work."

From the Philadelphia Daily News, of September 28th, 1853.

"Mr. Bennett may fairly be classed with the popular writers of the day, and in the present instance he has succeeded in presenting to the public a book of marked and thrilling interest, which will not fail to exercise a beneficial influence wherever it may be attentively read. The scene of the tale, is the city of New York; and, whilst it takes the reader alike to the splendid palatial residence of the wealthy aristocrat and the abode of poverty, the great end in view, the triumph of virtue over iniquity, is steadily and most beautifully pursued: the pictures are drawn with great force, and the 'Forged Will' is entitled to a place in the library of every man and woman who has a taste for light reading, and will not fail of an extensive sale."

From the Philadelphia Daily Pennsylvanian, of Sept. 29th, 1853.

"Few readers are not familiar with ' Clara Moreland,' the 'Prairie Flower,' and other thrilling stories of border life, Indian warfare, and prairie life, which have issued from Bennett's pen; and we are sure none who have read those will omit to read this, his last, best work. An excellent moral attends the tale throughout, and so well is the story told that it is almost impossible to realize that it is fiction."

From the Philadelphia City Item, of Oct. 1st, 1853.

"This is a profoundly interesting story, and, better still, it is useful - it teaches valuable lessons. Mr. Bennett is a writer of much ability. During the last three or four years, he has produced several fine books, but this is the ablest achievement of his literary life thus far. It is destined to attain an immense circulation. Mr. Peterson has issued the book in very handsome style."

From the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, of Sept. 24th.

"Mr. Bennett is a native author of talent, experience and industry, whose novels are always exceedingly popular. Nor are we surprised at his success, after reading the present fiction. The interest of the story begins with the first chapter, and is maintained unabated to the close, ever-varying but ever-absorbing. The scene of the tale lies principally in the city of New York. Like all Mr. Bennett's novels, the moral is an instructive one. Vice, indeed, triumphs awhile, but only for awhile; retribution awakes in due season, and virtue is rewarded. To read tales like these cannot be considered a waste of time. The disguise of fiction has been, in all ages, a far more effective way to inculcate lessons of life than dry didactics. We pay what we think the highest possible compliment to Mr. Bennett when we say, that he makes his novels as useful as they are fascinating."

Published and for Sale by T.B.PETERSON, No. 102 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

Read the following pages, containing editorial notices of the work.