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Choice Cookery | by Catherine Owen



Choice cookery is not intended for households that have to study economy, except where economy is a relative term; where, perhaps, the housekeeper could easily spend a dollar for the materials of a luxury, but could not spare the four or five dollars a caterer would charge. Many families enjoy giving little dinners, or otherwise exercising hospitality, but are debarred from doing so by the fact that anything beyond the ordinary daily fare has to be ordered in, or an expensive extra cook engaged. And although we may regret that hospitality should ever be dependent on fine cooking, we have to take things as they are. It is not every hostess who loves simplicity that dares to practise it.

TitleChoice Cookery
AuthorCatherine Owen
PublisherHarper & Brothers
Year1889
Copyright1889, Harper & Brothers
AmazonChoice Cookery

By Catherine Owen, Author Of "Ten Dollars Enough", "Gentle Bread Winners ;' Etc.

-Preface
Choice cookery is not intended for households that have to study economy, except where economy is a relative term; where, perhaps, the housekeeper could easily spend a dollar for the materials of a lu...
-I. Introduction
By choice cookery is meant exactly what the words imply. There will be no attempt to teach family or inexpensive cooking, those branches of domestic economy having been so excellently treated by capab...
-II. Sauces
In addition to the glaze, for which the recipe is given in the preceding pages, and which will make you independent of the stock pot, there are several other articles involving very small outlay which...
-Sauces. Part 2
B'Echamel This sauce differs from the white sauce only in the fact that the white stock used for the latter need not be very strong; for bechamel it should either be very strong or boiled down rapidl...
-Sauces. Part 3
Sauce A La D'Uxelles Chop fine a dozen small button mushrooms, or half a dozen large ones; parsley and chives, of each enough to make a teaspoonful when finely chopped; of lean ham a tablespoonful, a...
-III. White Sauces
SupReme sauce gives its name to several dishes dear to epicures - supreme de volaille, supreme de Toulouse, etc. It is made with a pint of thick white sauce, a pint of very strong chicken broth, four ...
-White Sauces. Continued
Beamaise Sauce This is one of the most difficult sauces to make, on account of the danger of the eggs curdling; but by the following method the work is rendered more sure than by the usual plan. It h...
-IV. Brown Sauces
It has been already stated that the family of brown sauces, like the white, have one parent, Espagnole, or Spanish sauce, which is the foundation for Chateaubriand, Finan-ciere, Robert, Poivrade, Piqu...
-V. Cold Sauces
Cold dishes which are such a pleasing feature of foreign cookery, are much neglected with us, at least in private kitchens, or they are limited to two or three articles served in mayonnaise, or a gala...
-Cold Sauces. Continued
Mint Sauce Take only the young, tender leaves, not a bit of stem, and chop very fine indeed. To two tablespoonfuls add a table-spoonful and a half of brown sugar and three of vinegar. It should be qu...
-VI. Soups
It is not proposed to give the soups to be found readily in most cooking-books in these pages, but only those less known or of peculiar excellence. It is supposed that the reader understands the maki...
-Soups. Part 2
Consomme Aux OEufs Files Put one quart of cleared consomme to boil. Mix one egg, one dessertspoonful of flour, one tablespoon-ful of milk, a pinch between forefinger and thumb of salt, and a dust of ...
-Soups. Part 3
Potage D La Royale Boil two ounces of macaroni till tender, but not broken; throw it into cold water. Put three pints of white stock to boil; cut the macaroni into lengths half an inch long; beat thr...
-VII. Fish Entrees
Instead of giving recipes for cooking fish whole, for which excellent directions are to be found in several modern cookery books, recipes for fish entrees will be substituted. They are now frequently ...
-Fish Entrees. Continued
Coquilles Of Salmon Or Halibut Take one pound of cold halibut or salmon; break it into small pieces; put it in a stewpan with half a saltspoonful of salt and a tiny pinch of pepper, and half a pint o...
-VIII. Various Ways Of Serving Oysters
Oysters A La Villeroi Scald (or blanch) some large oysters, dry them, then drop them into some very thick Villeroi sauce,* let them get hot in it, but not boil. Take them out one by one; be sure they...
-Various Ways Of Serving Oysters. Continued
Kabobs No. 2 This is the recipe given by the author of the well-known Pytchley Books, and is admirable. Take the beards from as many fat, fair-sized oysters as required. You require bacon of which th...
-IX. Various Culinary Matters
This little book does not pretend to go into what may be called the principles of cooking, except in so far as they are involved in the production of all choice cookery ; and where it is considered th...
-X. Entrees
Fillet Of Beef This favorite dish with French and Americans may be roasted whole, or cut so as to serve individually. To roast it whole, it must be trimmed perfectly round, and either larded or not a...
-Entrees. Part 2
Mutton Cutlets D La Ovuxelles Cut some cutlets from the neck of mutton, leaving two bones to each, trim very carefully, remove the upper part of one bone, split the cutlets without separating them at...
-Entrees. Part 3
Sauteing (A Word That Would Be Expressive Of The Process In English Would Be A Boon To Writers On Cooking) The process generally meant by frying is really saute'ing; yet so general has been the m...
-XI. Entrees Of Mutton Cutlets Or Chops
Mutton Cutlets D La Duchesse Take as many cutlets (or French chops) as required. Stew them in stock, with a small bouquet of herbs, very gently until they are perfectly tender. Take them up, skim the...
-Entrees Of Mutton Cutlets Or Chops. Continued
Cutlets Chaudfroid A La Russe For this cold dish mutton cutlets are used. They must be of the finest quality, and from mutton not newly killed. Cut as many cutlets as required, trim, and scrape the b...
-XII. On The Manner Of Preparing Croquettes, Cut-Lets, Kromeskies, Rissoles, And Cigarettes
Although these ever-popular dishes are all or may all be prepared from one mixture, there is a difference in the manner of using it which I will here explain. Croquettes are made from a soft creamy m...
-On The Manner Of Preparing Croquettes, Cut-Lets, Kromeskies, Rissoles, And Cigarettes. Continued
Braised Sweetbreads Take a pair of sweetbreads, lav in salt and water for an hour, then blanch. Press slightly between two dishes; when cold, remove all skin, fat, and gristle; cut up very fine a sma...
-XIII. Patties
The directions for making one kind will serve for patties generally. In cities the cases are very easily bought, but where they have to be made at home, only one who is already an expert in making puf...
-Patties. Continued
Sweetbread Patties Soak two very white sweetbreads in salt and water one hour; parboil for twenty minutes ; then let them cool; remove the skin, fat, and gristle; cut them into half-inch dice, and la...
-XIV. Entrees
In an earlier chapter I gave directions for quenelles as an adjunct to soups and for garnishing. Used in this way, they are only a revival of an old French fashion, coarsely imitated in the benighted ...
-Entrees. Continued
Timbale Of Chicken A La Champenois Chop a small slice of lean boiled ham, weighing about two ounces, put into a saucepan with four chopped mushrooms, four truffles, and an ounce of butter; stir in a ...
-XV. Entrees. - Continued
Cigarettes A La Reine These are the newest development of the rissole and croquette. They require strict attention to details to secure perfect form. Roll puff-paste a quarter of an inch thick; prick...
-Entrees. - Continued. Continued
Baked Ravioli Four ounces of veal, six ounces of butter, three ounces of lean sausage-meat, a teaspoonful of mixed sweet herbs, a little salt and pepper. Pound all in a mortar; when smooth, pound sep...
-XVI. Entrees. - Continued
Pigeon Outlets Take half a dozen young pigeons, split them down the back, and bone them, all but the leg, cutting off the wings at the second joint. Cut each bird in two down the breast; trim off all...
-Entrees. - Continued. Part 2
Souffle Of Partridges Clean and cook two partridges; remove the breasts and best of the other flesh without skin or sinew. Take two ounces of rice cooked till very tender, pound them together in a mo...
-Entrees. - Continued. Part 3
Grenadines Of Rabbit D La Soubise Take the whole backs of two rabbits from the shoulders to the thighs, both of which you reject; cut away the ribs and the thin part that forms the stomach, leaving o...
-XVII. Cold Entrees, Or Chaudfroids
These elegant dishes are suitable for formal breakfasts, luncheons, and suppers, and while presenting an unusually attractive appearance, are easier to manage than less elaborate dishes, because they ...
-Cold Entrees, Or Chaudfroids. Continued
Chaudfroid Of Chicken, No. 1 Cut up a young fleshy chicken into neat joints, remove the skin, mask each piece carefully with bechamel sauce; when quite set arrange on chopped aspic in a circle, garni...
-XVIII. Cold Entrees
Iced Savory Souffle This dish can be made of fish, game, or chicken, but is considered best made of crab. Cut up the crab, or whatever it may be, into small pieces; let it soak in mayonnaise sauce fo...
-Cold Entrees. Continued
Canapes A La Bismarck Cut circles with a small cutter from slices of stale bread a quarter of an inch thick; saute in butter till they are a light brown; spread over each when cold a thin layer of an...
-XIX. Galantines, Ballotines, Etc
Galantines are so useful and handsome a dish in a large family, or one where many visitors are received, that it is well worth while to learn the art of boning birds in order to achieve them. Nor, if ...
-XX. How To "Fillet." - Cold Game Pies
I have spoken several times of filleting. To some readers an explanation of the term may be necessary. To cut up a bird does not indicate the meaning, nor does the term to carve it do so, becaus...
-How To "Fillet." - Cold Game Pies. Continued
Preparation For Filling The Case Fillet chickens, guinea-hens, partridges, or grouse (leave pigeons or quails whole, but bone them). Put sufficient pieces of one sort, or all sorts mixed, to fill the...
-XXI. Garnishes
In all choice cookery the appearance of dishes has to be carefully studied. However good the taste may be, the effect will be spoiled if its appearance on the table does not come up to the expectation...
-Garnishes. Continued
A Few Ways Of Cooking Vegetables It is not intended to go into the general cooking of vegetables, although it may be said that even the choicest cooking can offer no greater luxury, or, alas a greate...
-XXII. Various Ways Of Serving Vegetables
Stuffed Cucumbers Cut large-sized young cucumbers into slices about two inches thick, rejecting the ends. Peel, and remove the seeds; scald the slices for ten minutes, plunge them into cold water, an...
-Various Ways Of Serving Vegetables. Continued
Stuffed Spanish Onion Parboil a Spanish onion; then drop it into ice-water; take out the centre and fill it with force-meat; cover with a thin slice of sweet fat pork; sprinkle with a teaspoonful of ...
-XXIII. Jellies
In this country culinary skill seems to run to sweet rather than to savory cooking; very few housekeepers but make excellent preserves and cakes, yet the list of sweet dishes manufactured at home is v...
-Jellies. Continued
Mould Of Apple Jelly Peel and cut up a pound of fine-flavored apples (to weigh a pound after preparation); put them in a stew-pan with three ounces of granulated sugar, half a pint of water, and the ...
-XXIV. Jellies. - Continued
If it is kept in mind that two ounces of gelatine to the quart of liquid is the right proportion, and that if even a tablespoonful of flavoring, fruit juice, or what not, is added, exactly the same qu...
-Jellies. - Continued. Continued
Jelly With Candied Fruits Make a quart of maraschino jelly, which is done by omitting the rum, lemon, and cinnamon from the last recipe, and using in place of rum a gill of maraschino, and water in p...
-XXV. Cold Sweets. - Creams
Coffee Cream Make half a pint of custard with two eggs and half a pint of milk; dissolve an ounce of gelatine and three ounces of sugar in half a gill of strong coffee; add the custard, and strain; w...
-Cold Sweets. - Creams. Continued
Almond Cream Half an ounce of gelatine melted in a gill of water with two ounces of sugar and a glass of sherry; grate four ounces of almond paste into it, and stir in a double boiler or bowl set in ...
-XXVI. Creams And Frozen Puddings
Nut creams, with the exception of almond, are not very well known, but are so delicious that they ought to be. One reason perhaps is that it is not generally known that kernels of nuts, such as hazel-...
-Creams And Frozen Puddings. Continued
Frangipanni Iced Pudding Grate six ounces of almond paste to crumbs; then on a smaller grater grate four or six bitter almonds blanched and dried; pound a dozen candied orange-flower petals with thre...
-XXVII. Iced Puddings
Filbert And Wine Iced Pudding To one pint of cream put four tablespoonfuls of sugar and two glasses of fine sherry. The cream must be perfectly sweet, but should be at least twenty-four hours old, an...
-Iced Puddings. Continued
Ice-Creams And Ices There are so many ways of making ice-cream that all one can do is to indicate the one or two best, and certainly the very best is the simplest, and there is no dessert so easy to ...
-XXVIII. Ice-Creams And Water-Ices
To those very fond of tea, ice-cream made with it is very acceptable, and is very much used at English garden parties. Tea Ice-Cream To one pound of granulated sugar put a pint of strong green tea...
-Ice-Creams And Water-Ices. Part 2
Cinnamon Water-Ice This is a German ice, and very much liked by those who are fond of the flavor. Pound an ounce of the finest quality of cinnamon in the stick, put it into a pint and a half of boili...
-Ice-Creams And Water-Ices. Part 3
Curacoa Pare a dozen and a half of dead-ripe oranges so thin that you can see the knife pass under the rind; pound one dram of finest cinnamon and half a dram of mace; put them to steep for fifteen d...
-XXIX. Miscellaneous Sweets
Under this head I intend to give a few sweets that seem to me unusually good, although they may not always be novel, except in manner of serving. A compote of fruit has nothing new about it, yet by th...
-Miscellaneous Sweets. Continued
Compote Of Apple Marmalade This is not so troublesome to make as it sounds, especially to any one who has made glace nuts - a very general accomplishment nowadays. Reduce some apple marmalade by lea...
-XXX. Miscellaneous Sweets. - Continued
Strawberries, raspberries, currants, etc., need very little cooking, and that little in high candy. If it is understood that strong syrup tends to make fruit firm, and weak syrup to make it tender, it...
-Miscellaneous Sweets. - Continued. Part 2
Orange Baskets Glace These are not much more trouble than the baskets simply preserved, but if successfully done they can be very effectively filled with candies or ice-cream. Prepare the baskets as ...
-Miscellaneous Sweets. - Continued. Part 3
Little China Dishes This quaint recipe is from the immortal Mrs. Glasse, and on trial was found so unique and agreeable a variety to our modern fancies that with some little changes to suit our prese...
-XXXI. Miscellaneous Sweets.- Continued
Raspberry Charlotte Russe The simplest and quite the most effective way of making charlottes of any kind is the following : Take a strip of light cartridge or drawing paper from two to three inches w...
-Miscellaneous Sweets.- Continued. Continued
Almond Turban Make half a pound of fine puff-paste, give it nine turns, roll it the last time to the thickness of a dollar; have ready half a pound of almonds, blanched and chopped; put them in a bow...
-XXXII. Fine Cakes And Sauces
Madeleines Four ounces of butter, four ounces of the best flour, three ounces of sugar, a teaspoonful of orange-flower water, the yolks of four eggs, and rind of a lemon. Beat butter, sugar, and yolk...
-Fine Cakes And Sauces. Continued
French Sweet Sauces For Puddings, Etc Sauce Madere D La Marmalade A half-pound of apricot marmalade; half a tumbler of Madeira or sherry; boil three minutes, then pass through a sieve, and serve a...
-XXXIII. Salads And Cheese Dishes
Salad has come to form part of even the simplest dinners; and certainly cold meat and salad and excellent bread and butter make a meal by no means to be despised even by an epicure, while cold meat an...
-Salads And Cheese Dishes. Part 2
Grape-Fruit Salad Prepare the fruit, some hours before it is wanted, in the following way: Cut the fruit in four as you would an orange; separate the sections; then remove the pulp from each, taking ...
-Salads And Cheese Dishes. Part 3
Cheese Puffs Line patty-pans with puff-paste, and fill three parts full with the following mixture: put a gill of cream in a double boiler with two ounces of grated cheese (half Parmesan if liked), a...
-Books For The Household
MRS. HENDERSON's PRACTICAL COOKING. Practical Cooking and Dinner Giving. A Treat-ise containing Practical Instructions in Cooking: in the Combination and Serving of Dishes, and in the Fashionable mod...







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