Doughnuts

One pint of rich sweet milk made warm, four ounces of fresh butter melted in the milk, one pint and a half of white granulated sugar, two tea-spoonfuls of grated nutmeg and one'teaspoonful of salt all put into the milk, four yo!ks beaten with one tablespoonful of sugar and stirred into the milk, two quarts and one pint of sifted flour with seven teaspoonfuls of baking powder mixed with it, four whites beaten with one tablespoo'nful of sugar to a stiff foam, make a hole in the centre-of the flour and stir in the milk with the other ingredients until it is as thick as batter cakes, then stir in the whites and the remainder of the flour, make the dough quick and as moist as possible, roll out half an inch thick and cut with a cake cutter. The lard should be hot enough to brown when the cakes -are put in, and only cakes enough to cover the top of the lard should be put in at a time. They will rise in two minutes, then turn them and fry two minutes longer.

Doctors' Cake

One pint of sweet milk, two ounces of fresh butter, one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg, one tea-spoonful of salt, half a pint of white granulated sugar, four fresh eggs beaten separately, one quart of flour, four teaspoonfuls of Royal baking powder. Put the milk, butter, nutmeg, salt and sugar into a sauce pan over the fire, and when the butter is melted and sugar dissolved, set it on the side of the range where it will keep warm, but not hot. Beat the yolks and stir them into the milk, beat the whites with one tablespoonful of white sugar to a stiff foam, mix the flour and baking powder together. Stir the milk into the flour until it is as thick as batter cakes, then stir in the whites and the rest of the flour.

Cornmeal Griddle Cakes

Stir one pint of sweet milk boiling hot into one pint of sifted meal, then stir in one tablespoonful of fresh butter and one even teaspoonful of salt, beat the yolks of four fresh eggs with one tablespoonful of cold milk, and when the meal is not scalding hot stir them in, then stir in one heaped tablespoonful of flour and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder; beat the whites with one tablespoonful of white granulated sugar to a stiff foam and stir them in last; set the pan of cakes into a pan of warm (not hot) water whilst they are being baked; it will make them very light. Bake as soon as the whites are in.

Corn Mush

Put three pints of boiling water into an iron pot over the fire, sift one full pint of corn meal into a large bowl and stir into it one pint of rich sweet milk boiling hot, and stir into the boiling water, then put in one tablespoonful of fresh butter, two tablespoonfuls of white granulated sugar and one teaspoonful of salt. Stir it constantly and boil it thirty minutes; pour it into a flat bottomed dish; it cuts out better when cold if it is to be fried.

Fried Corn Mush

Cut the cold mush in slices half an inch thick and of equal lengths. Have ready on the fire a frying pan containing one tablespoonful of fresh butter and one of fresh lard, and when it is hot enough lay in the slices of mush and fry them on both sides a light brown.