Red Raspberry Jelly

To three pints of raspberry juice put one pint of currant juice, and one pound of white granulated sugar to each pint of juice. The raspberries and currants must be ripe and gathered in dry weather. Mash the raspberries with a wooden beetle in a porcelain preserving kettle and boil them ten minutes; then strain them through a linen cloth and measure. Put the currants into a preserving kettle, stems and all; mash them and boil ten minutes, then strain and measure; mix the currant and raspberry juice together in the kettle and stir in the sugar, as soon as it begins to boil skim it as quick as possible, for it often jellies in five minutes. Put it hot into jelly glasses with double writing paper cut to fit the inside, dipped in brandy. Use jelly glasses with metal covers, and the jelly should be cold before the covers are made tight.

Red Raspberry Marmalade

To three pounds of raspberries put one pound of currants and three quarters of a pound of white granulated sugar to each pound of fruit; mash the raspberries and currants together in the kettle and boil them ten minutes; then add the sugar and boil twenty minutes longer, stir it all the time with a wooden spoon to prevent it from sticking. Put it hot into small glass jars or jelly glasses with double writing paper cut to fit the inside, dipped in brandy. Close the marmalade when cold, if put in jelly glasses.

Black Baspberries, Canned For Pies Tarts And Sauce

To three pounds of raspberries put one pound of ripe currants, and two pounds of white granulated sugar to four pounds of fruit; after the currants are picked and weighed mash them with a wooden beetle and put them in the bottom of the preserving kettle and sprinkle a handful of sugar over them, then put in a layer of raspberries and a layer of sugar until all are in; set the kettle on the side of the range where they will heat slowly for one hour, or until the juice is extracted; then stir them up from the bottom, let them get hot and they are ready to put up. Put them into glass jars, hermetically sealed.

Currant Jelly

To one pint of currant juice put one pound of white granulated sugar. Pick the leaves out from the currents, then mash them stems and all together, with a wooden beetle and put them into a porcelain preserving kettle and boil them ten minutes; then strain through a linen cloth, measure and return the juice to the kettle. Mix the sugar and juice together before the juice is hot and stir it with a wooden spoon until it begins to boil, then skim it as quickly as possible, for it will be jelly in about five minutes. Put it hot into jelly glasses, cover with double writing paper cut to fit the inside, dipped in brandy. Close with metal covers when the jelly is cold.

Canned Cherries

After the cnerries are stemmed and stoned, weigh them, and to each pound of cherries allow half a pound of white granulated sugar. Put them into a porcelain kettle, a layer of cherries and a layer of sugar until all are in. Then add one quart of water to six pounds of cherries. Put the water in at the side of the kettle, set them over a slow fire and let them heat gradually for two hours, or until the juice is extracted, then let them come to a boiling heat and they are ready to put up. Put them into glass jars hermetically sealed.