Preserved Green Gage Plums

To one pound of plums allow one pound of white granulated sugar, and one-half a pint of water to each pound of sugar. Take large fine green gage plums that are not fully ripe but have turned a little yellowish, pick them, weigh and wash them in two waters. Put the sugar and water into a porcelain preserving kettle, and as soon as the sugar is dissolved put in the plums, turn them over with a skimmer, that they may heat evenly. As soon as the skins are curled and cracked move them to the side of the range, where they will not boil. Let them stand for one hour, or until the juice is extracted; then cover the kettle and set it in a cool place over night. In the morning set them on the fire and when they are at a boiling heat take the plums out onto large porcelain dishes. Boil the syrup, skim it and return the plums to the kettle; let them get hot, but not to boil, cover the kettle and set it away until the next morning, when they are ready to put up. The syrup must cover the plums. Put them into glass jars hermetically sealed.

Green Gage Jelly

The plums for jelly should be fully ripe. Wash them or wipe them off with a wet cloth, take off the stems and cut out the spots, weigh them, and to one pound of plums allow half a pint of water. Put the plums and water into a porcelain preserving kettle and boil them twenty minutes, then strain them through a linen cloth; after they are all strained, strain the juice over again; measure it and to each pint of juice allow one pound of white granulated sugar. Put the juice and sugar into the preserving kettle and stir it until the sugar is all dissolved, as soon as it begins to boil look at your watch, skim it well and let it boil ten minutes. Put it hot into the jelly glasses with double writing paper cut to fit the inside, dipped in brandy. When it is cold close up with metal covers.

Canned Green Gage Plums

Plums for canning should not be fully ripe. To four pounds of plums allow two pounds of white granulated sugar and half a pint of water; pick the plums carefully, taking out all the spotted ones and those that are fully ripe, for jelly. Weigh them and wash them in two waters, put the sugar and water into a porcelain preserving kettle and as soon as the sugar is dissolved put in the plums, set them over a slow fire and turn them over carefully from the bottom of the kettle with a large skimmer that they may heat evenly and not break. This must be done as soon as they are put on the fire and continued until they are done. As soon as the skins curl and split open and they are scalding hot they are ready to put up; they must not boil nor break. If there is not syrup enough add a little hot water and mix it well together. The quantity of syrup depends a great deal on the ripeness of the plums. Put them into glass jars hermetically sealed.

Canned White Heath Free-Stone Peaches

To four pounds of peaches, one pound of white granulated sugar. In putting up peaches for the table I prefer the White Heath. They are rich in flavor and delicate in color. They should not be over ripe. Pare them and cut them in halves, or if they are very large, quarter them and take out the stones. Put into the preserving kettle a layer of peaches and a layer of sugar until all are in, then put in one pint of water to one bushel of peaches, sprinkle the water over the top of the peaches, set them on the side of the fire where they will heat very slowly. They should stand one hour and a half before they are put over the fire, or until the juice is extracted. Crack one quarter of the peach stones and put the kernels into a small saucepan with water enough to cover them and boil them thirty minutes; then strain off the water and mix it with the peaches. It gives them a fine flavor. As soon as the juice is extracted set the kettle over the fire, and when they are at boiling heat (but not to boil) they are ready to put up. Put them into glass jars hermetically sealed. Peaches for pies are put up in the same manner.