Canned White Heath Cling-Stone Peaches

Take cling-stone peaches that are ripe and after they are pared, divide them into quarters and cut them from the stones. To four pounds of peaches allow one pound of white granulated sugar and one pint of water. Put the peaches into the preserving kettle with a layer of sugar between each layer of peaches, then put in the water at the side of the kettle and set them on the side of the fire where they will heat slowly. Crack one quarter of the peach stones and put the kernels into a small saucepan with water enough to cover them and boil them thirty minutes. Then strain the water off and mix it with the peaches. Cook the peaches until they are tender, but they must not break. Try them with a fork and when they are soft they are ready to put up. Put them into glass jars hermetically sealed.

Peach Preserves

To one pound of free-stone peaches one pound of white granulated sugar and half a pint of water.

Pare the peaches, cut them in halves and take out the stones, put them into a porcelain preserving kettle, the cut side uppermost, with a layer of sugar and a layer of peaches, finishing with a layer of sugar. Then put the water in at the side of the kettle; set them on the side of the range where they will heat slowly for one hour and a half; crack one quarter of the stones, take out the kernels and boil them in one pint of water for thirty minutes, then strain off the water and put it in with the peaches, set the kettle of peaches over the fire, and as soon as it comes to a boiling heat, but not to boil, take it off, cover it and let it stand over night. In the morning let it get boiling hot, but it must not boil; then take the peaches out with a skimmer onto large porcelain dishes; boil the syrup long enough to skim it well and then return the peaches to the kettle, set it over a slow fire and as soon as the peaches look clear they are ready to put up.

Peach Marmalade

To one pound of peaches allow three quarters of a pound of white granulated sugar and one pint of water to four pounds of peaches. Take ripe, juicy free-stone peaches; pare them, take out the stones and crack one quarter of them, put the kernels into a saucepan with water enough to cover them and cook them thirty minutes, then strain off the water, cut the peaches into thin slices and put them into a porcelain preserving kettle with one pint of water to four pounds of peaches and cook them ten minutes from the time they begin to boil; then add the sugar and the water from the kernels, stir it well with a wooden spoon and cook it twenty minutes longer. Put it into glass jars or jelly glasses with double writing paper cut to fit the inside, dipped in brandy.

Brandy Peaches

White Heath "clings" are the best for brandy peaches. Weigh them before they are skinned and mark it down on paper with a pencil. To one pound of peaches allow half a pound of white granulated sugar, one gill of water and half a pint of white brandy. Put eight ounces of cooking soda with two quarts of cold water into an iron pot and let it get scalding hot, then put in one dozen of the peaches at a time and let them stay in just five minutes, then take them out with a skimmer into a colander. Rub off the skin with a dry, coarse linen cloth and put the peaches into a large pan full of cold water. Put the sugar with one gill of water to half a pound of sugar into the preserving kettle and when it is dissolved take the peaches out of the water into a colander, let them drain a minute and then put them into the syrup, turn them over from time to time and skim when anything rises. Cook them slowly until they are soft enough for a silver fork to go easily through, then take them out onto flat porcelain dishes and boil the syrup down to one half, skim it as long as anything rises to the surface, and then take it off the fire and let it cool ten minutes. Then put in the brandy and return the peaches to the brandy syrup. Set the kettle over the fire again and when it is hot (but not to boil) take it off the fire and rill the glass jars first with the peaches and then with the brandy syrup. The syrup must cover the peaches. Close the jars hermetically.