Canned Seckel Pears

To four pounds of pears, one pound of white granulated sugar, two quarts of water, one ounce of whole cinnamon, two large lemons and one pint of red wine. Wash the lemons, slice them and take out the seeds. The pears must not be over ripe. Pare them, leaving on the stems and taking out the blossom end. Put them into the preserving kettle with the water, cinnamon, lemons and sugar and boil them one hour, or until they are tender; try them with a fork; it depends upon the size and ripeness of the pears. Then take them out onto large porcelain dishes and strain the syrup through a linen cloth; return the syrup and pears to the kettle and put in the wine. When it comes to a boiling heat they are ready to put up. It must not boil after the wine is put in. Put them into glass jars hermetically sealed. They are excellent.

Siberian Crab Apple Jelly

There are two kinds of crab apples. The largest size is mellow and has very little juice, the smaller size is juicy and the best for jelly. They are ripe the latter part of August. Wash the crab apples in two waters and spread them on a table that is covered with a cloth, select the finest, cut off the stems, take out the blossom end and slice them in three pieces, skins, cores and seeds all together. Weigh them, and to four pounds of apples put one quart of cold water and one lemon; wash the lemons, wipe them, slice them and take out the seeds; put the whole into a porcelain preserving kettle and boil it thirty minutes, then strain through a linen cloth. Put a small quantity of the apples in at a time, it will be quicker done; after they are all strained, strain the juice over again. To one pint of the juice allow one pound of white granulated sugar, put it into the preserving kettle and stir it well together; when it begins to boil skim it and boil five minutes. I have had it jelly in that time. Put it into jelly glasses with double writing paper cut to fit the inside, dipped in brandy, and when the jelly is cold close with metal covers.

Quince Jelly

After the quinces have been washed, wiped and the blemishes and blossom end removed, pare them, quarter them and cut out the cores; put them with the cores, seeds and skins from the canned quinces. Weigh them, and to one pound of skins and cores, allow one pint of water. Boil them twenty minutes; put them into a wire sieve, and when the juice has run through strain it through a linen cloth. Cut the quartered quinces in thin slices and to one pound of quinces put one pint of the juice; cook them until they are soft, but not to break; strain through a linen cloth. To one pint of the juice put one pound of white granulated sugar, mix the juice and sugar well together before putting it on the fire. As soon as it begins to boil skim quickly, it is jelly in five minutes. Put it into jelly glasses with double writing paper cut to fit the inside, dipped in brandy. This jelly can be colored beautifully with cranberry juice, one pint of cranberry juice to four pints of quince juice, but there must be one pound of sugar to a pint of juice.