IT is difficult to exaggerate the importance of good roads to the farmers who are obliged to transport their produce to market, and we insert the cut which is taken from the report of the Department of Agriculture for the State of Illinois by special request, as it shows the best manner of grading a road-bed. It is advisable that the road-bed be at least 25 feet wide with the ditches not less than 7 feet wide, and 9 feet is preferable. This extreme width of road-bed (and water-ways) will leave 12 1/2 feet on each side for the planting of shade-trees, and yet give ample space for pedestrians. Ditches should begin at nothing, running gradually back to the extreme depth, 11 inches to 2 feet. The grade should be carried continuously up and down the slopes and over the summits of the undulations, as well as in the valleys, then the crowning surface of the road carries the water naturally to the water-ways or ditches at the side, thus always leaving the road-bed in good condition. One of the mistakes most often made in road-making is that the ditches are left deepest in the middle, and rising alike toward the road and the bank, or deposit near the road-bed. This is entirely wrong. They should slope gradually to a point at the outside of the ditch next the fence, and from thence they should rise sharply to the surface of the ground. The reason is obvious: If the lowest point of the gutter be in the center of the ditches or near the road-bed, and there be enough water to wash at all, there will be danger that the road-way may be abrased, or eaten into by water. If deepest next the fence, then water will wear from, rather than towards the road-way, and all difficulty of washing will be avoided. Thus the whole when completed should present an appearance as hereafter illustrated.

A road thus made, graded high, with ample ditches on each side, will be good for fully ten months in the year. It is as perfect a road as can be made in a prairie country, and so cheaply, that the ordinary road-tax for three years will furnish good and sufficient earth-roads, well-graded, on every sectional line in every prairie township.

We desire to state that we receive no pay, directly or indirectly, for the insertion of this notice. We believe it will contribute a little to the attainment of that great desideratum, good roads in the farming districts.

We give the following tables for the benefit of farmers interested in making levees, roads, or turnpikes. It is contributed by the Wauchope Road Grader Manufacturing Company of Chicago. The tables show the measurement of embankments of stations of 100 feet in length, with slopes 1 1/2 horizontal to I perpendicular:

Width Of Road-Bed On Top Ten Feet

Hight.

Cubic Yds.

0.0

0.0

1...

3.8

2. .

7.6

3..

11.6

4..

15.7

5

19.9

6..

24.2

7..

28.6

8..

33.2

9..

37.8

1.0

42.6

1 . .

47.5

2. .

52.4

3..

57.5

4..

62.7

5..

68.1

6..

73.5

7..

79.0

8..

84.7

9..

90.4

Hight.

Cubic Yds.

2.0. .

96.3

1 . .

102.3

2. .

108.4

3

114.6

4..

120.9

5..

127.3

6..

133.9

7..

140.5

8..

147.3

9..

154.1

3.0..

161.1

1..

168.2

2. .

175.4

3..

182.7

4..

190.1

5..

197.7

6..

205.3

7..

273.1

8..

22I.0

9..

228.9

Hight.

Cubic Yds.

4.0. .

237.0

1 . .

245.2

2. .

253.6

3.

262.0

4..

270.5

5..

279.2

6..

287.9

7..

296.8

8..

305.8

9..

314.9

5.0. .

324.1

1 . .

333.4

2. .

342.8

3..

3524

4..

362.0

5..

371.8

6 .

381.6

7.

391.6

8..

401.7

9..

411.9

Hight.

Cubic Yds.

6.0. .

442.2

1 . .

432.6

2. .

443.2

3..

453.8

4..

464.6

5..

475.5

6..

486.4

7.

497.5

8..

508.7

9..

520.1

7.0..

531.5

1..

543.0

2.

554.7

3..

566.4

4..

578.3

5..

59°.3

6..

602.4

7..

614.6

8..

626.9

9..

639.3

Hight.

Cubic Yds.

8.0.. .

651.9

1.. .

664.5

2. .

677.3

3...

690.1

4...

703.1

5...

7l6.2

6...

729.4

7...

742.7

8...

756.1

9...

769.7

9.0 ..

783.3

1...

797.1

2...

8u.c

3...

824.9

4...

839.0

5...

853.2

6...

867.6

7...

882.0

8...

896.5

9...

911.2