The boudoir or morning room so vaunted by agents seems to me very superfluous for young married people.

In early married days and in winter, for reasons of economy, the husband being out all day, there seems no reason why the wife should not share the man's sitting-room. But if the drawing-room is used, she must live in it, or it will have an unbearably stiff appearance. The great advantage of the two-roomed house, with the absence of a dividing landing on the bedroom floors, is in case of illness. No one who has had to experience any kind of nursing fails to appreciate the great importance of rooms that communicate, and much suffering is often spared to the nervous child who feels the presence of its nurse in the adjoining room, and sees the gleam of the nursery light through the half-closed door. Besides, in the busy modern London life, those who have lately become one will feel it an advantage, by no means to be despised, that they can talk at all sorts of odd times through the open door, and discuss life's little difficulties, which are often created by a non-understanding of the circumstances. When man and woman are joint masters in the small details of everyday life and the just ruling of servants and children, there should be the comprehension of what Mr. Morley calls 'government by discussion, which is now counted the secret of liberty.' George Eliot says somewhere that 'a man with an affectionate disposition who finds a wife to concur with his fundamental idea of life easily comes to persuade himself that no other woman would have suited him so well, and does a little daily snapping and quarrelling without any sense of alienation.' How true this is; but also, how infinitely better is it that this should be done upstairs than in the drawing-room or dining-room, possibly before servants and guests.

Having now given my opinion on the preferable style of house, for the sake of argument I will say that the young couple decide on the more fashionable locality, and weight their income with a disproportionately high rent. Under these circumstances I think the disposition of their income and general expenditure would work out into something like the following table :-

s.

d.

I.

Rent,rates and taxes..........

0

0

II.

Housekeeping, including living, washing, lighting

550

0

0

III.

Repairs, insurance, cleaning, painting, &c. .

100

0

0

IV.

Coal.........

60

0

0

V.

Dress (man and woman)

200

0

0

VI.

Wages, including beer, for four servants

130

0

0

VII.

Wine

60

0

0

VIII.

Stamps, newspapers, stationery, &c.

30

0

0

IX.

Doctors, dentists, accidents, journeys .

100

0

0

X.

New house linen.........

20

0

0

XI.

Charities.......

40

0

0

1,650

0

0

Cabs, amusements, and presents will have to be saved out of clothes or journeys ; with so heavy a rent, putting by money some years will be very difficult. Here I must add a grave word of caution against a practice, only too common I fear, of running into debt over the process of furnishing. A wise man ought to have money in hand before he decides to marry. If he has no savings, it is better to take some portion of his capital and pay his bills, returning it by degrees out of his yearly income. In this way he begins fair on strictly ready-money principles, by which I mean paying everything weekly, an impossibility if stray bills keep coming in. Any bill that cannot be paid weekly should be paid quarterly. One bill I fear often postponed is that of the doctor. I think it would be immensely to the advantage of both doctor and patient if it were a more received custom that the general practitioner should be given his half-guinea, like the M.D. his guinea, at the close of each visit. Few people have any idea of how unjustly doctors are treated as regards their bills, hardly liking to complain when they are neglected or even forgotten altogether. At the time of the illness no fee is ever grudged, but doctors' visits carelessly indulged in are apt to run up a very heavy bill, which causes considerable and unjust irritation at Christmas. Receiv-ing bills, paying bills, and running up new bills poison the first weeks of the new year to a great many.

I enter into no details with regard to servants' wages, as on this subject also opinions vary widely as to which department is to have the experienced and expensive servant. Speaking in a general way, every maid represents an additional sixty or seventy pounds a year, and every man another seventy or eighty. These sums cover all expenses connected with a servant, including wages. It is generally worth while to increase wages to keep a good servant, and few things are more extravagant than changing servants ; but no one gets what he wants by offering wages above the average. If for an exceptional case wages are raised, always go back on changing the servant to the sum you originally gave. In the eighth volume of Mr. Charles Booth's wonderful book, 'The Life and Labour of the People in London,' there is a chapter on domestic indoor servants which gives considerable information, and which, I think, all young householders would do well to read. It is with no small surprise one realises how very limited in number, as compared with population, are the people who can afford to keep any servants at all. Mr. Booth says, 'With three servants - a cook, parlourmaid, and housemaid - a household is complete in all its functions ; all else is only a development of this theme.' Most of my young women friends will be surprised to hear that he gives the lady's-maid no place at all, and of course she is the easiest servant to suppress without altering the style of living or inconveniencing the husband in any way. A large class of people who keep three servants, even if they increase them to four, add a kitchenmaid, or an up-and-down girl, rather than a lady's-maid. I am inclined to think that in early years of married life a lady's-maid, besides being a great comfort, partly pays for herself by the saving of dressmakers' bills, and turning old things into new. It is fancy things made at home that really pay, not petticoats and under-linen. The lady's-maid, too, must undertake the mending of house linen, an important duty, as very few housemaids are to be trusted to do any fine needlework at all; though if one afternoon a week is set apart under the lady's-maid's superintendence the housemaid would probably be quite capable of sewing on buttons and doing necessary repairs both to house linen and the husband's underclothes. A woman who is obliged to have all her things made out will find the allowance of 100Z. a year insufficient, if she is to be well dressed. It would mean buying ready-made shop clothes or going to inferior dressmakers. The beauty of dress is not so much what it costs, as the individual representation of the wearer's mind and taste. No one, putting aside the very best dressmakers, can carry this out so well as an intelligent maid at home. This also applies to the dressing of children. There is perhaps no time in a woman's life when she can be so well dressed on what is now called 'a small allowance' as in the early years of her married life. She has her trousseau to work from, and if she is sensible even in London she will go little into society beyond dining out: it should be her object to reduce the number of entertainments for which different dresses are required, it being much more difficult and expensive to dress suitably than smartly. London clothes, luckily, do quite well for Saturdays and Sundays in the country; though they are most inappropriate for real country life.