To one who has been long in city pent,

Tis very sweet to look into the fair

And open face of heaven, - to breathe a prayer Full in the smile of the blue firmament. Who is more happy, when, with heart's content,

Fatigued he sinks into some pleasant lair

Of wavy grass, and reads a debonair And gentle tale of love and languishment, Eeturning home at evening, with an ear

Catching the notes of Philomel - an eye Watching the sailing cloudlet's bright career,

He mourns that day so soon has glided by; E'en like the passage of an angel's tear

That falls through the clear ether silently.

For the young, the energetic, and the ambitious, towns arebestatfirst, and they cangravitate towardsthe country as they grow older.This surely is one of the greatest inducements for saving, and in no sense is it a mean or lowering object.We will begin now with our changed table of expenditure for life in the country. The most important reduction will be in the house-rent.

Table - Country

s.

d.

I.

Rent, rates and taxes ....

180

0

0

II.

Housekeeping (living, washing, lighting)

450

0

0

HI.

Repairs, insurance, cleaning, painting .

100

0

0

IV.

Coal.......

80

0

0

V.

Dress (man and woman)

180

0

0

VI.

Wages, including beer (four servants) .

130

0

0

VII.

Wine.......

50

0

0

VIII.

Stamps, newspapers, stationery .

30

0

0

IX.

Doctor, dentist, accidents, journeys

100

0

0

X.

New house linen.......

20

0

0

XI.

Charities.............

40

0

0

1,360

0

0

This table shows considerable reduction, and, if saving is not very necessary, a pony, carriage, and groom can be added, besides the obligatory garden, which, well done, including wages and all expenses, must be counted at 150Z. a year : so the table now stands :-

s.

d.

Carried forward ...............................................

1,360

0

0

Garden................................................

150

0

0

Pony, carriage, groom..............................................

130

0

0

1,640

0

0

This does not include the initial cost of buying the pony and carriage and setting up the stable.

With these luxuries the margin is as narrow as the London one. Any careful housekeeper will find it easier to make reductions in the country, though it will probably be at the expense of having friends to stay, which is one of the pleasures of living in the country, minimised by the fact that it often interferes with your pursuits, care of poultry, garden, &c, as very naturally the friend who takes the trouble to come and see you exacts your undivided attention. One of the expenses of country hospitality is not only the laundry bill, but the wear and tear caused to good linen from always being in the wash-tub. I confess to often feeling considerable sympathy with the landlady of olden times who felt it such a pity to send sheets to the wash, and gave orders to damp them a little and iron them out.

Furnishing in the country can be done even more simply and sensibly than in London. If washing house linen is more, cleaning of curtains and chintzes, &c, is infinitely less; three months of London making things much dirtier than a year in the country. The great secret of sensible and yet pretty furnishing is observation and keeping your eyes open. People as a rule notice nothing, and come into a house and garden almost as if they were blind, and it is curious to observe how the awakening comes when they are going to furnish for themselves. This selfish impetus should not be necessary. The want of training of sight, scent, and hearing are among the great deficiencies of civilised education, and I fancy this defect has been keenly felt in South Africa. The newspapers have commented upon this subject from time to time, and I noted from one the other day that 'as a matter of scientific fact there is little difference in the powers of vision of different races. The difference lies in the faculty of detection, and this is a matter of training and constant practice. Two men have equally good sight, but one, by reason of the necessity of his daily life, will be able to detect an unusual object, whilst the other will be entirely unable to recognise anything abnormal. This being so, it is all the more necessary that the training of the eye should form a very important part of a soldier's education in the art of war. Scouting and judging of distances will have to be reckoned with in any practical scheme of army reform.' This is no doubt perfectly true, but the training of the eye and the quickening of the powers of observation should begin with both sexes from the very earliest age. And I am convinced that no one can manage a house and garden well unless these faculties are highly developed.

Poultry keeping in the country is a pleasure and an interest, but it hardly pays unless eggs are sold in the winter and chickens in the early spring.If the garden is carefully and knowingly stocked to supply the wants of every month in the year, the saving in the weekly books is considerable, as nothing ought to bebought except potatoes,and the plentiful supply of vegetablesfor many months in the year considerably reduces the butcher's book.Everyone who has space in the country should keep pigs;nothing so prevents waste or actually pays better. Buying two young ones twice a year - once in January, selling them in May, and buying again two more in May, giving them nothing till well on in October but green vegetable garden refuse and the wash-tub.This tub must be kept carefully clean - that is to say, no meat or tea-leavesor coffee-grouts.Itisquiteacommon cook'strick tothrow into the pig-tubtheheads and insides of game or poultry ;this is quite wrong, and will easily produce diseased pigs.InOctober acornsand chestnuts are good for them, but they make the meat hard unless the pigs are fed on barley-meal for quite three weeks before they are killed;part must be sold and part preserved for home consumption.Curing hams from a good receipt, with a careful cook, not only thoroughly pays, but produces far better hams than those usually bought.