I. Thin Batters

Popovers Experiment 77.

To determine the factors that affect the texture of popovers. Recipe:

Milk 1 cup

Eggs 2

Fat 1 tablespoon

244 grams 96 grams 12 grams

Flour 1 cup

Salt 1/2 teaspoon

112 grams

A. Batter just mixed.

Prepare 3/4 of the recipe. Mix only enough to free from lumps. Bake the popovers in deep cups of the same size, shape, and material. Grease and fill the cups 1/3 full. Use 3 cups and weigh 40 grams of batter into each cup. Bake one at 180° to 190°C. (355° to 375°F.), one at 220° to 225°C. (425° to 435°F.), and the third at 240° to 250°C. (465° to 480°F.). Save the remaining batter for part B.

Temperature of baking

Texture

Volume

Appearance

Crust

Inside

180-190°C.

220-225

240-250

B. Batter thoroughly beaten.

Beat the batter remaining from A vigorously for 3 minutes. Divide into 3 parts, using 40 grams of batter in each cup. Bake at temperatures given under A.

Temperature of baking

Volume

Appearance

Texture

Crust

Inside

180-190°C.

220-225

240-250

C. Variations in proportions of ingredients.

Bake at the temperature found best under A and B.

1. Reduce the flour in the recipe to 7/8 cup.

2. Reduce the flour in the recipe to 3/4 cup.

3. Omit the egg in the recipe.

4. Increase the eggs in the recipe to 3.

Considering the volume, size of the cavity, the appearance, and the texture, does the beating of the batter produce a better popover? Which proportion of flour gives the best popover? Which is the best temperature for baking? Does the egg serve as a liquid or as a thickening agent? What effect does the egg have on the "lightness" of the popover? Does it serve as a leavening agent or does it hold the shape after the popover is leavened by something else? What is the means of leavening? Can the egg be omitted? Which proportion of egg is best?

Volume

Appearance

Texture

Flavor