Most Americans know the Fringed Gentian, familiar to them as botanists, or as lovers of Bryant's charming poetry. This will give a good idea of the family of gentianaceae. That has a regular tubular four-parted flower, with the stamens and pistil rising straight in the centre of the flower. The genus Exacum belongs to the same natural order, but has a wheel-shaped or rotate corolla, while the stamens and pistil have a recurved character, showing a tendency to irregularity. Besides the interest the flower affords bo-tanically, it is a plant well worthy of the attention of the cultivator. It is an introduction of Haage & Schmidt, of Erfurt, who give the following account of it:

Exacum affine.

Exacum affine.

"New biennial species from Sokotora, forming small compact bushes about six inches high, and having dark green, ovate, three-nerved leaves, and terminal clusters of violet purple, beautifully Cyclamen-scented flowers with yellow anthers. It may be cultivated as a temperate stove plant or as a half-hardy annual, and will, when sown in the autumn, produce its flowers very frequently and incessantly from February till November. When sown in spring it will flower during the summer, and continue in full bloom through the winter, being in consequence a desirable addition to the winter-flowering decorative plants. A charming novelty, deserving a place in every garden".