While exhibiting a pretty Amaryllis to a person fond of flowers, and with some desire to know about them, though too modest to permit one to say she had botanical tendencies, the writer was asked: "You say this is not a lily but an amaryllis, and that it belongs to a very different family of plants; but it looks like a lily to me. How can you tell it is not a lily?" It was a good chance to explain that there was often not much difference in nature between families of plants placed widely apart by botanists; that in some cases organs free from one another would make one distinction, while the same organs united would be the leading distinction in another. And it was the case here. In the Amaryllis the tube of the perianth was united with the ovarium, and thus the seed vessel seemed to be below the flower, while in the lily the perianth or showy floral part was not united, and hence the seed vessel would seem to be placed inside or above. In this way we could see at a glance that the lily was not an amaryllis, or a plant of the amaryLis flower was not a lily. It will serve a good purpose to give here, for the benefit of those interested in these closer studies of flowers, illustrations of these differences.

Lilium Philippinensis is given on page 246; on page 248 is a new Eucharis which represents an amaryllidaceous plant. Both were introduced by William Bull, of Chelsea, London.

Milium Philippinensis.

Milium Philippinensis.

The last by the way is a new addition to our winter flowering greenhouse plants; introduced as Eucharis Sanderii, and described as a distinct and beautiful new species, imported from the United States of Colombia. The flowers are white and, as in other species, are produced in umbels; they have a perianth tube, which is dilated into a funnel in the upper end, a limb of six white spreading segments, the three outer of which are ovate and shortly acuminate and the three inner much broader and blunter, and a white corona marked with six yellow stripes; the corona is so shallow that it merely projects as a [rim beyond the mouth of the tube. The leaves are deep green, broadly ovate, and traversed longitudinally by numerous deep furrows, which "give them a ribbed appearance.

Eucharis Sanderii.

Eucharis Sanderii.