When the young student of natural history sees a cucumber or a cantaloupe, he gets a fair idea of what the natural order of cucurbitaceae is like. But there are cases where general aspect would fail to give a clue, and only a correct diagnosis of essential character would be a safe guide. We give herewith a sketch of a curious member of this family, introduced to our notice by Messrs. Haage & Schmidt, of Erfurt, who give the following interesting account of it. It is one-half the natural size: "Charming and interesting climbing Cucurbitacea from Brazil growing twelve to fifteen feet in height. Its branching habit and thickly set abundant foliage make it specially well adapted lor covering arbors and fences or for garnishing festoons. The whitish flowers, as is mostly the case in this tribe of plants, are not very conspicuous, but the deeply cut five-lobed leaves together with the numerous hazelnutlike fruits appearing in dense clusters render this plant one of the most attractive climbers for outdoor culture.

To judge by the tuberous-like root it may be treated as a perennial, but it succeeds well in any warm border as an annual".

Wilbrandia drastica, Mart. (Formerly Rhyncocarpa glomerata).

Wilbrandia drastica, Mart. (Formerly Rhyncocarpa glomerata).