The ornamental species belonging to the genus Calandrinia are mostly natives of South America, and like the Mignonette are shrubby plants there, though with us, and also in Europe, they are treated as annuals. The name Calan-drinia was given to this genus in honor of L. Calan-drini, an Italian botanist Few flowers have a more striking effect than the little Calandrinia speciosa, (of which the accompanying engraving is a very good representation,) with its brilliant dark crimson flowers peeping out from its thick and beautiful bed of leaves. The flowers open in the morning, and present as rich a mass of foliage and flowers as can be desired; but by three o'clock in the afternoon every little flower is closed. With the exception of the early closing of the petals, this species deserves to be generally cultivated, as nothing can exceed the rich velvety look of the flowers. It is quite hardy, a true annual, and ripens its seeds in great abundance. It is a native of Northern California, whence its seeds were sent to England in 1832, by Douglas. It should be sown in dry and exposed situations, where it can have abundance of light and heat; as the situation in which Douglas found it was a hot, dry bank.

It requires very little water, and flourishes best in weather when most other plants are burnt up. It is well adapted for rock-work. It may be sown two or three times during the season, and at any time from April to July.

The Malope grandiflora, or large-flowered Malope, a correct drawing of which we give, taken from our growth of last season, is really one of the most showy annuals that adorn our garden. The plant grows from three to four feet high, and a bed covered with its blossoms and no less beautiful buds is an object of no ordinary beauty. It belongs to the Malvaceae family, several members of which are to be found in our fields and road-sides.

* Continued from April number.

CALANDRINIA SPECIOSA.

CALANDRINIA SPECIOSA.

MALOPE GRANDIFLORA. NEMOPHILA MACULATA.

MALOPE GRANDIFLORA. NEMOPHILA MACULATA.